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Cross Dissolves

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Ryan Atkins
Cross Dissolves
on Jun 22, 2008 at 6:23:41 pm

This has happened the past 2 times I've added a loop of a clip.

Whenever I try to loop a clip, or put another video clip beside another and want to add a cross dissolve, FCP 6 and 5 never lets me. I always get the X saying the action I want to do can't be done. Thing is, I just want to blend them together, of course I won't have any lead in or lead out footage, right?

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 22, 2008 at 6:34:36 pm

[Ryan Atkins] "Thing is, I just want to blend them together, of course I won't have any lead in or lead out footage, right?"

Exactly right. You have to "cut in" on the tail of the A-clip and the head of the B-clip exactly the number of frames necessary for both sides of the dissolve to have video underlying the effect. So, if you have a 30-frame centered dissolve, cut in 15 frames on both sides of your cut on the timeline before placing the filter.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Ryan Atkins
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 22, 2008 at 6:46:06 pm

Ok, so I literally need to "razor" off the end of A-clip and the beginning of B-clip. Tell me if I'm misunderstanding you.

Thanks.


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Chris Poisson
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 22, 2008 at 7:13:33 pm

Ryan,

I think what you have to understand is that there is sufficient media on both clips to allow for a dissolve. You still make the cut right where you want it.

Have a wonderful day.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 22, 2008 at 7:53:40 pm

[Ryan Atkins] "Ok, so I literally need to "razor" off the end of A-clip and the beginning of B-clip. Tell me if I'm misunderstanding you."

Yes, that's one way of doing it, or when editing to the timeline you could move your out-point fifteen frames earlier on the A-side and fifteen later on the B-side. In both cases, you're providing handles underlying the effect on both clips, and of course ths needs to be done because you exported these clips and are now using them start to stop with no extra heads or tails.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Ryan Atkins
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 22, 2008 at 10:26:16 pm

Thank you very much. I am teaching my self most of Final Cut on my own.


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Colin McQuillan
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 12:43:50 am

[Ryan Atkins] "I am teaching my self most of Final Cut on my own"

this particular situation is not really a "Final Cut" issue. This pertains to any NLE and even any linear edit suite. If you are going to dissolve/transition in or out of a clip, there needs to be video there that lasts the duration of the effect. You can't have a transition if you have no frames to transition with...

If you are on the last frame of clip A, and clip B has some headroom on it, you can drag your dissolve to the left side of the edit point, and the transition will back itself into the first clip. Same works vise-versa. But as you see, if both clips are on their perspective first/last frame, you cant have your transition.

Colin McQuillan
Van. B.C.
;-P


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 1:02:03 am

[Colin McQuillan] "this particular situation is not really a "Final Cut" issue. This pertains to any NLE and even any linear edit suite."

Hey Colin, let's not forget film... Remember, that was that stuff with sprocket holes they once shined light through to make images on walls.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Colin McQuillan
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 1:15:29 am

Well, Dave... I'm simply not old enough to know of such things!



Colin McQuillan
Van. B.C.
;-P


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Boyd McCollum
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 5:23:42 am

Editing with film was the original NLE...


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 6:17:17 am

Film and tape are actually linear. It's the random access of audio and video and/or film digitized to hard drives that makes digital editing non-linear.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Boyd McCollum
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 6:45:02 am

I'm not sure how film is linear. It may not be computerized, but it is random-accessed. In fact much of editing in FCP uses film editing methodologies, though a whole lot faster, if not as tactile. IMHO.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 7:14:49 am

Boyd,

The definition of "non-linear" is that media can be accessed and played back from disk by heads that can move at random to any point on a disk instantly. Film and tape must be shuttled or run in a straight line (i.e. linear) past a stationary head in order to access different parts of the tape or of the film. This is why you need to wait while the tape in your camera rewinds in order to see the bars and tone at the head of the tape, but once it digitized you can instantly access the head, tail, or any point in between. The same is true of film, it must be run backwards or forwards in a linear fashion to view or access different parts of the film on a reel, and you must wait for the part that you want to access while the rest of the material passes by.

Does that help you to understand the difference?

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.


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Colin McQuillan
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 7:50:57 am

A nonlinear system is a system which is not linear, i.e. a system which does not satisfy the superposition principle. Less technically, a nonlinear system is any problem where the variable(s) to be solved for cannot be written as a linear sum of independent components. A nonhomogenous system, which is linear apart from the presence of a function of the independent variables, is nonlinear according to a strict definition, but such systems are usually studied alongside linear systems, because they can be transformed to a linear system as long as a particular solution is known.

Colin McQuillan
Van. B.C.


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Chris Poisson
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 11:36:45 am

DAVID!!!

Another thread hijacking, and you're right in the middle of it! ;>)

Have a wonderful day.


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Boyd McCollum
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 24, 2008 at 5:47:17 pm

David,

If you want to go by technical definitions, I know "an NLE" refers to one of the current crop of computer-based editing systems such as FCP, AVID, etc. Also, by the strict definition, "linear editing" refers specifically to a tape-based editing system that uses one or more source decks that then record to a VTR. In these cases, film-based editing occupies its own niche.

However, in a broader sense, what constitutes linear and non-linear goes beyond just being able to instantly place your playhead at some point. It's not about "scrubbing" through footage in a linear fashion. What makes tape-based editing systems linear is that cuts must be made sequentially. The most common example would be making an insert edit. You would need to reconstruct in some fashion all the edits that came after the inserted footage. In non-linear editing, the footage after the insert is just pushed down the timeline and doesn't need to be recreated.

As for random access, film is random accessed, if not to the same degree, speed, and precision of a computer-based NLE. In film editing, footage is broken down into discrete clips and organized into bins (a lot of the nomenclature for FCP comes from film editing). In film editing, you don't need to scrub through Takes 1, 2, 3, and 4 to get to Take 5. You grab Take 5. In a tape-based system, you would need to scrub pass the first 4 Takes to get to Take 5. At that point, all editing takes on a linear quality, even in "an NLE", while you look for the exact in and out points to make a good edit (aesthetically, etc.).

One could even make an argument that film is the original "digital" format. One frame is one frame. It's either on or off. (yes, I being somewhat humorous and realize that film isn't really digital and doesn't meet most, or even all, the criteria for being digital. In the same way that I understand the difference between film editing and computer-based nonlinear editing.)

The point of my original comment was that film editing has a lot in common with today's crops of NLEs and the way we edit today has its roots in film editing, hence me saying editing film was the "original NLE". Anyways, for those that want to view film/film editing as being "linear" that's fine. I disagree, and won't belabor the point.

Regards,

Boyd


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Ryan Atkins
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 11:55:07 am

Film has always been linear, just like tape to tape editing.


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Ryan Atkins
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 11:57:09 am

Just out of curiosity, do you know how Film is digitized?


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Chris Poisson
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 1:04:42 pm

Ryan,

As long as you're in on this hijacking, fine. Film is digitized on a machine called a telecine, and it can either be laid to tape or to a digital file. This is done by a colorist, people who may have a great set of eyes but make absurd amounts of money to make it look the way their clients want it.

This is done a post houses such as Complete Post in LA, if you visit their site you can see what it all about.

Have a wonderful day.


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Ryan Atkins
Re: Cross Dissolves
on Jun 23, 2008 at 1:14:52 pm

Ok, thank you. I was just inquiring about dissolves and my question is answered.


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