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Shooting at 60fps but editing at 24fps (no slow-mo)

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paolo drusi
Shooting at 60fps but editing at 24fps (no slow-mo)
on May 19, 2018 at 9:43:45 pm

Hi,

I'm intending to film at 60fps to have the option to slow-mo SOME parts of the footage, but not all (maybe using twixtor). Slow-mo is not really relevant to my question here.

The sequence I'll be working on, and the final video, will be at 24fps.

If I have 60fps footage, will the video experience any issues if the sequence and editing are at 24fps? I know that there's some degree of camera blur missing and that some frames will be dropped, but my question is: will the final video look ok or will it have issues, for example jerky/bumpy/not smooth playback?

I'm working on Final Cut Pro 7, but I've access to Adobe Premiere.

Thank you
Paolo


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Todd Terry
Re: Shooting at 60fps but editing at 24fps (no slow-mo)
on May 19, 2018 at 10:25:30 pm
Last Edited By Todd Terry on May 19, 2018 at 10:28:28 pm

It just depends on what look you want and what your tastes are as to whether or not the results will be acceptable to you.

If you have anywhere from a medium amount to a lot of motion on screen (which I'm guessing you do since you want to slow-mo), then when viewing this at "normal" speed you are going to have a fair bit of that "narrow shutter" look in your motion where everything seems sort of staccato and choppy. If you are (I assume) shooting the 60fps with a180 °, shutter, then the look will be the same as if you shot "normal speed" footage with a 1/120th shutter speed instead of the customary 1/48th. So yes, there will be very little motion blur and your footage will have the narrow-shutter look when viewed at the normal speed.

This may bother you, this may not, or you might even like it and feel it is appropriate to your project. Personally, I usually hate seeing a too-fast shutter speed the vast majority of the time. For every instance that it is used well and appropriately (i.e. "Saving Private Ryan") that are countless other instances where it is used poorly and to the point of great annoyance (i.e., "Gladiator," most any martial arts movie or fight sequence, and any film where the situation is either "Fast" and/or "Furious").

There are some ways to introduce some artificial motion blur during editing which may help smooth out this staccato look, and it might be good enough. It will probably never look as good as shooting with the "right" frame rate for the intended usage though. If at all possible, I would ALWAYS try to shoot a normal frame rate unless I knew it was likely to be slow-mo'd. Although if you have scenes that can only be shot once that you might want to slow-mo, then overcranking might be the best choice after all and you just have to sacrifice a bit of the look you want for the normal-speed shots.

All that being said, it would be very easy to test to see if the look is what you want (or good enough). Just grab a camera and shoot some 60fps footage and see what it looks like on a 24fps timeline. OR... shoot some 24fps footage but set your shutter speed to 1/120th and see how it looks to you. You won't even have to go into editing if you do it that way... you can instantly see what it will look like in your viewfinder or on a monitor.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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paolo drusi
Re: Shooting at 60fps but editing at 24fps (no slow-mo)
on May 20, 2018 at 12:06:20 pm

Hi Todd,

Thank you so much for your exhaustive explanation. This is the best info I could find on this topic!

You mention that you assume that I'm intending to shoot at 60fps with a 1/180 shutter speed. I'm actually intending to film 60fps with a 1/120 ss. Would this mitigate the choppiness and crispiness if played at 24fps?

Thank you!
Paolo


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Todd Terry
Re: Shooting at 60fps but editing at 24fps (no slow-mo)
on May 26, 2018 at 1:29:50 am

Hey, sorry for the slow response...

[paolo drusi] "You mention that you assume that I'm intending to shoot at 60fps with a 1/180 shutter speed. I'm actually intending to film 60fps with a 1/120 ss"

No, I said you'd be shooting 60fps with a 180 degree shutter, not 1/180th. A minor but important difference. A 180° shutter means that in the equivalent of a film camera (which would have a rotating mirror shutter) where the shutter is 180° a disc-shaped rotating mirror that is cut exactly in half ... that is, it exposes the film for half the time during each advance of the film, and blocks the film for the other half. Ergo, shooting 60fps with a 180° shutter yields an exposure time of 1/120th of a second (a "normal" shutter speed being the equation "One over twice the frame rate"). In the same vein, shooting 24fps with a 180° shutter gives you a shutter speed of 1/48th of a second.

In hindsight, I probably shouldn't have even mentioned the degrees... that was probably confusing. That was the old film guy in me coming out. While many digital cine cameras (such as my Canon C300PL) will let you set shutter speeds in degrees, most people prefer to set them as fractions of a second.

Sorry for the confusion....

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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