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ENG shooter

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Sascha Engel
ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:04:40 pm

I just couldn't find it anywhere: What does the term ENG shooter stands for? I understood its defining a one man camera crew - Rob Rodriguez style?

Thanx for answering.


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Mark Suszko
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:11:14 pm

Electronic News Gathering.

As opposed to EFP: Electronic Film production.


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john sharaf
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:30:14 pm

EFP not film but Electronic Field Production, more studio like technicals on location, such as camera control units, engineering and/or switching.

JS


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Sascha Engel
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:30:30 pm

Thanx. So one describes news shooting, the other film productions?


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Todd Terry
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:15:34 pm

[Sascha Engel] " I understood its defining a one man camera crew - Rob Rodriguez style?"

What Mark said... and no as to Rodriguez... unless he happens to be shooting a news event. "ENG" is a television term pretty much limited to news shooters using video cameras.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:18:16 pm

Right you are, Todd. Shooting news for broadcast. Shooting non-news things like documentary, we called it EFP.
Now let me hang a fresh onion on my belt....


What Rodriguez is probably trying to describe is, a technique used by ENG shooters who have to work fast and efficiently on a deadline of just an hour or less, and without a lot of spare film or tape.

When they compose and shoot a story, they try as much as possible to "edit in camera". This means they try to sequence the shots such that you could play the raw tape out of the camera right to air, and it would tell the story without need for any editing. If you get a shot wrong, you back up the tape and get it again, in one take, and you don't leave tape running while you zoom and re-position the camera. You start and stop recording knowing that each time you do that you are creating a cut transition, so you don't stop on a medium and start on another medium, you find a tight or a wide before you hit the record button again. I used to shoot entire weddings and their receptions this way, in-camera, and at the end of the night, hand the camera master to the bride as a finished product. You can do that if you know the tricks.



This is the video equivalent if you will of the print journalists' "inverted pyramid format" for writing a news article.

In the print world, you sequence the information in the inverted pyramid format, most important details first, so that if they need to shorten it in a hurry, they trim paragraphs away from the bottom, and the story still holds together. When shooting in the "Edit In Camera" style, you are conserving film/tape/drive space, and sequencing the shots and sound bites in linear storytelling fashion. The idea here is that the stuff may still get edited a bit, but it will only be to tighten up the editing choices you already made in the field, maybe add voiceover and graphics over the top of your already-done work.


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Todd Terry
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:38:54 pm

To beat the horse just a little more, Sascha....

...Those are both mostly "television station terms"... I've never really heard them used to apply much of anywhere in the industry outside of broadcast television.

ENG, or Electronic News Gathering is when a news videographer shoots footage for inclusion in a nightly newscast or such. EFP, or Electronic Field Production, is a term you'll hear in a television station referring to the departments that go out and shoot commercials for advertising clients, station promos, and things like that.

As I said, I've never heard the term used outside of the television station world. You usually won't hear it used in, say, the documentary or feature film world... except maybe to say a project was shot ENG-style, meaning a run-n-gun one-man band crew, etc.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Rick Amundson
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:52:00 pm

Just to add my 2 cents ... I work at a large production company in the Midwest. We do all kinds of production but mostly commercial and corporate work using every camera from the Alexa to the 170. We still use the term ENG crew to describe a 1 or 2 person crew (shooter/audio) that might be covering a political candidate, doing a run-and-gun corporate shoot or anything that moves quickly and doesn't need a lot of finesse. We use the term EFP to describe a 3-4 person crew (shooter/audio/grips) doing a larger corporate shoot with more complex set-ups or a small, low budget commercial crew, etc. Once we start adding, gaffers, camera assistants, make-up and PAs, we don't use those terms.

Best of luck!

Rick Amundson
Producer/Director/DP
Screenscape Studios
Bravo Romeo Entertainment
http://www.screenscapestudios.com
http://www.bravoromeo.com
http://www.indeliblemovie.com


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Sascha Engel
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 9:57:07 pm

Thanx for further horse beating, but with ur last sentence,
You confirmed what I said in the first place: Run & Gun Robert Rodriguez style. Problem of tv and film world - to much showing off of geek terms. Too much ego based on pseudo knowledge. But I'm really happy I got it properly explained. Thanx again.


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Todd Terry
Re: ENG shooter
on Nov 18, 2011 at 10:10:43 pm

I think it's just one of those cases where terms get fuzzed and through years of mostly misuse of their "real" meanings they can grow to mean something else. Obviously, in its strictest, most correct, and most literal sense, electronic news gathering is for news. But yes, people are using the term to mean something shot in that style, even though it's not real ENG. Terms and meaning change through time.

Much like there were probably quite a few posts in various forums on the COW today where people were talking about having filmed something with their Sony such-and-such, or wondering how to film a certain scene with their DSLR... all from people who have probably never shot a foot of motion-picture film in their lives. But it's becoming a (somewhat) accepted misapplied term. It bugs a lot of people, especially those of us who sometimes do shoot film. Another soapbox for another time. I've learned to let it go, though.

Horse thoroughly beaten...

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Rolli Barron
Re: ENG shooter
on May 1, 2015 at 8:17:53 pm

I assume all cameraman/videographer working in Broadcast MEDIA know the meaning of ENG& EFP..


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john lanford
Re: ENG shooter
on Dec 16, 2015 at 3:02:07 pm

NEVER assume anything. This is no longer the case in this industry with the proliferation of cheap cameras and endless media (digital cost Nothing in comparison to times gone by). Trying to teach a noob how to shoot economically for ENP is very hard, well, as is the same for EFP. The drawback of cheap cameras and media is the lack of limitations that force "shooters" and "cine's" to think before hitting the record button. "I'll fix it in post" is again the solution to everything.


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