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Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML

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Richard Clabaugh
Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 5, 2016 at 11:02:56 pm

I sent an XML of a 24p project (23.976) from Premiere Pro to DaVinci Resolve for color correction and it came in a complete and total mess. Nothing linked correctly. In checking I became aware that Premiere Pro was incorrectly reading / showing / reporting the timecode values on all the source video clips. Checking those same clips in multiple other programs show an agreed upon timecode for each clip (checked in DaVinci Resolve, Final Cut Pro 7, Quicktime7 and Adobe After Effects) but Premiere shows a different value for the timecodes for all camera clips, rendering any form of EDL it exports effectively useless by any other program.

Project is mostly interviews and accompanying B-roll, all shot at 24p on an EX1 XDCam camera which I have used reliably for years and for tens-of-thousands of hours of material (at 24p mostly) with no problem. The problem is NOT the camera, the problem is NOT the source video files, the problem is NOT in Resolve and is actually not really even in the XML - the problem is simply Premiere Pro has its own imaginary idea of what the timecode on the clips is compared to every other program in the universe.

The problem is clear and simple: bad timecode, wrong timecode, incorrect timecode read from source video files in Premiere Pro. Why? Surely others have dealt with this!

I have successfully exported XMLs from Premiere to Resolve with no problem at all when doing projects at 30fps, in fact I did 6 commercials just this week and many, many more in the weeks and months before this, but I realized in thinking back, that this may be the first time time I've exported a 24p base XML from Premiere Pro. Before this I've either kept my 24p projects within the program or, previoulsy, I was using FCP7. When the footage did not match up AT ALL, I went hunting and found this very clear timecode problem - that what Premiere shows as the timecode for each clip is just plain wrong compared to every other program, making it impossible to export a workable XML file for use.

I've searched the web and forums and have found multiple other people reporting this problem, but no answers on those threads. (One unanswered post was so old it was now marked as "presumed answered" even though there was clearly no answer!)

Here is one post someone did in great detail describing the exact same problem, although he was comparing to AVID. He also did not have a solution:
http://jefferyharrell.tumblr.com/post/19643443810/how-saving-a-day-cost-me-...

I've tried many things, but no results. Obviously to get through this I'll do some manual, sledgehammer blunt force fix like manually conforming every clip in the project in Resolve, but this is stupid. It's clearly a bug. What are other people doing? Does anyone know if there is a switch in Premiere I need to throw to fix this?


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 5, 2016 at 11:44:20 pm

Have you tried exporting an EDL to see if that has the same TC issue(s)?

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist & Workflow Consultant
David Weiss Productions
Los Angeles


David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Richard Clabaugh
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 2:54:08 am

I did, in fact, try that as one of the first steps in the process and the results were exactly the same, and for the same reason. The EDL reflected the same incorrect timecode values from the source clips.

To be clear, these in the EDL and the XML are the values that, if you manually look at the Premiere Pro timeline, is says are the start and end timecode values in the source clip for each edit, but those numbers ONLY match those frames in Premiere. No other program agreess that those numbers goes to those frames, so the EDL, like the XML, produced a garbage result.


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 4:34:23 am

Gotcha! It's just a standard test as you know to try to rule out broken XML translation, which is one of silly things that sometimes happens when bigger things in our NLEs get "fixed."

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist & Workflow Consultant
David Weiss Productions
Los Angeles


David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Richard Clabaugh
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 4:44:53 am

I very much appreciate your feedback. It's a logical thing to check. I remain open to any other suggestions.


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Peter Garaway
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 12:02:54 am

Hi Richard,

Sorry for the troubles. Not sure if this is a practical solution for you but have you tried modifying the timecode of your clips that are not being interpreted correctly via Modify> Timecode?

I'm not seeing any open issues with files from the EX1. Can you provide a sample file for us to look at?

Thanks in advance,

Peter Garaway
Adobe
Premiere Pro


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Richard Clabaugh
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 4:06:58 am

Regarding Modify > Timecode -- I have not yet tried that for several reasons.

First, I would be unsure what the correct modification would be.

As an example, one clip I have:

Quicktime and Resolve mutually report that first frame TC = 15:38:29:08
Premiere Pro says the first frame TC = 15:37:33:01

That's a difference of 56-sec and 5-frames

But by the end frame of the clip ( 3min-11sec-12 frames)

Quicktime says the Last Frame TC = 15:41:41:00
Premiere says the Last Frame TC = 15:40:44:13

That's now a difference of 56sec and 9-frames
A change of 4 frames in roughly 3-1/4 minutes.

If we were in NTSC (30fps/60i) I'd think Dropframe vs Non-Drop Frame, but there is no DropFrame in 24p (23.976)

It's not enough difference for a 24fp vs 30fps difference, which would be a much higher drift (6 frames per second).

Stepping through frame-by-frame does show both are counting only 24fps base (going from frame 23 to the next second in all programs).

Have not looked to see if there are "drop frames" in either program, but Quicktime reports NDF and, as I said, there is no such thing as 24p drop-frame TC.

Comparing other shots I find that all clips, and parts of clips, have a different offset, so in terms of modifying timecode, I didn't know what to put in as a correct timecode adjustment, since it drifts and their was no constant offset, although it does seem that the higher the timecode number value, the greater the difference.

Second reason I did not try this - concern I might really seriously mess up Premiere's file of the timeline and I'm on a deadline with this project and that could be serious - so messing with the underlying timecode without being sure what to adjust it to, felt like it might be unwise at this juncture.

If you know from experience this will fix the problem, however, I will gladly take your consul and do what you suggest -- just reluctant to experiment below the hood while on a tight project deadline.

Regarding the EX1 footage -- While not impossible I am disinclined to think it is the culprit here. I've used it for years now with no problems in both Premiere Pro and Final Cut, DaVinci Resolve and After Effects, trading footage between each program at both 24p (23.076-just to be precise) and at 30p (29.97) with no problems, including just this week posting a bunch of commercials shot at 30p. This is the only problem that has arisen and the only new combination of elements is Premiere to Resolve at 24p.

Well, okay - not 100% true. A couple updates and corrections to my original post that may be important:

My wife (an editor here) pointed out that we did export another 24p project, a feature film shot in 4K on the Red Epic, and that project, which was quit large and lengthy, had no timecode issues when the XML was taken into Resolve for Color Correction. That was done at a post house off site but I checked the XML here in our version of Resolve before sending it on and it opened fine and re-linked correctly. So we HAVE exported a 24p project, and a very large one, successfully before with no problem.

While I am not ruling out the 24p-XDCam format file being somehow connected to the problem, it's not my first thought, especially since two other posts I've see regarding this problem used different file formats but had the same issues.

Follow the link in my original post, go midway down the page and you'll see some screen captures this man did in Avid and Premiere of matching timecodes and matching frames (where the timecodes differed) and what he described and experienced with AVID is exactly what I'm experiencing here.

I will add one VERY IMPORTANT CORRECTION to my original post - on re-examing a clip in After Effects, it turned out to be showing the same timecode that matched what Premiere Pro said -- so the Adobe Programs (Premiere Pro and After Effects) are saying one number while the non-Adobe programs (Final Cut Pro 7, QuicktimePro7, DaVinci Resolve) are all saying a different number.

If you think a sample clip would be useful let me know where to send it and I will.

I confess I was sort of hoping someone reading this might say, "Yes, I had that happen to me and all you have to do to fix it is go to preferences and set your interociter-interpretation techno-code emulater to read timecode channel2A in Latvarian trans-digit-multiplex mode, and all will be fine!" Something so simple and obvious I'd be slapping more forehead going, "Duh, of course, what didn't I think of that!"

Just hoping! :-)


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 4:43:31 am

Send me a clip (like 2-mins long) with known timecide. You can send it to drw000 at mac dot com.

Or...

If you can send the entire card via Dropbox that would be even better, but if not I can understand.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist & Workflow Consultant
David Weiss Productions
Los Angeles


David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Richard Clabaugh
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 5:44:17 am

Sent you an email with a link to a file along with details on what my system shows for the timecode in various programs.

Thanks for trying to help out here.


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Tero Ahlfors
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 6:44:45 am

Have you imported the footage using the media browser panel?


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John Pale
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 12:45:24 pm

I'll second this. Its been my experience, importing via File/Import or drag and drop may give you different results than using Media Browser, which is much better at detecting media types. Try the Media Browser and see if the timecode is correct. Also, some media types will not work correctly with spanned clips if you do not use the Media Browser.

For what it's worth, I also saw this problem occur in Avid, where allowing the system to auto-select the AMA import plugin rather than manually selecting it resulted in the wrong timecode (hundreds of clips...grrrrrr.) This was because the wrong MXF file type was selected (P2 instead of Sony).


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Andreas Kiel
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 8:05:11 pm

Richard wrote:
Quicktime says the Last Frame TC = 15:41:41:00
Premiere says the Last Frame TC = 15:40:44:13

That's now a difference of 56sec and 9-frames
A change of 4 frames in roughly 3-1/4 minutes.

If we were in NTSC (30fps/60i) I'd think Dropframe vs Non-Drop Frame, but there is no DropFrame in 24p (23.976)


That's the difference between 23.976 and 24

- Andreas

Spherico
http://www.spherico.com/filmtools

"He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby
become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will
also gaze into thee." - Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


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Peter Garaway
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 6:37:28 pm

Very interesting Richard. Thanks for all of the details. David brought up some good suggestions.

I'd also like a sample of the file if possible. Getting the file into the hands of a developer should be helpful understanding where things are going wrong.

pgaraway at adobe dot come

Thanks !

Peter Garaway
Adobe
Premiere Pro


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David Roth Weiss
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 6, 2016 at 7:32:07 pm

Peter,

Interestingly, the clip Richard sent did not yield anything useful after my analysis other than the TC difference between Premiere and every other product, just as Richard described. Since he transcoded via a Sony app rather than via the Abobe Media Browser, I thought that some underlying metadata might not have been translated properly, and I recommended that, as a test, he import the camera card directly thru the media browser. He's doing that now.

I used to have an app that could show all the underlying metadata mostly invisible at the user level, but I've lost that app. In the past I was able to identify flags that were inadvertently not triggered by certain recorders and encoding apps, which could be the issue in this case with the translation by the Sony app.

In any case, it will be interesting to see if your developers can pinpoint the issue. Or, if perhaps the issue is fixed simply by importing the card directly via the media browser.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist & Workflow Consultant
David Weiss Productions
Los Angeles


David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.


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Richard Clabaugh
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 11, 2016 at 5:45:35 am

Thought I'd share an update.

In short, the problem remains unresolved be we've covered a lot of ground.

First, thanks to David Roth Weiss for looking over the clip and confirming what I found - Adobe programs read the timecode one way, every other program reads it another way. Since then I have tried several things he suggested and spent days trying to determine the cause and create some work arounds. I have tried more than I care to itemize here right now, but suffice to say the problem has not gone away and no quick fixes, or slow fixes, have revealed themselves. The problem continues to defy all logic and the attempts to fix have created only more puzzlers.

My final "work around" for the time being, after a very long list, was that Adobe Media Encoder also reads the timecode in the same manner as Adobe Premiere -- so I used it to transcode the XDCam files into ProRes files and in the process it embeded within those files the same (incorrect) timecode that Adobe Premiere Pro was showing. This, at least, gave me a piece of "source" video I could bring into other programs and they would then find the right spots in the video to match what Premiere listed in it's exported XML file. With this, I was able to do color correction in DaVinci Resolve on the first of seven segments for the show I'm working on.

Other than that, the situation has gotten worse as several other segments that appeared to be fine have turned out to have similar read errors within Premiere when I export them - but inconsistently.

The latest is I opened an edit delivered to me by an editor, who worked on Premiere Pro for Windows, made sure it was good on one machine here in my office (Premiere Pro CC 2115 on my iMac) and all was good. Copied the project (and footage) to another drive, took it to another machine in my office (also an iMac running the same version of Premier Pro) and when it opened everything was wrong - the timecode had read differently between the two machines and this time Premiere Pro didn't match up to it's own timeline.

My deadline for delivery is this weekend and I'm using brute force workarounds at the moment and several of them have failed.

I just want to conclude by saying -- after considerable testing - this definitely appears to be a bug within the program - at least as far as I'm concerned. If a program cannot read the timecode consistently, it should either show some kind of error message or start counting from 00:00:00:00 at the head of the clip. At least that tells you there's a problem. To display what appears to be a perfectly valid timecode, only to have it turn out to be different from all other non-Adobe apps seems like a problem to me. As stated in my original post, I am NOT the only person to encounter this.

If I can find a real cause or solution to this I'll post it here. Meanwhile, I've just got to get this job out.

Just didn't want to leave everyone hanging!

This problem remains unresolved.


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Andreas Kiel
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 11, 2016 at 12:35:10 pm

Thanks Richard for publishing the details of you problem.

I said earlier in this thread that the time difference is the difference caused by 23.976 and 24 fps.
Could you send me an XML from Premiere that causes the trouble in Resolve. There might be a chance to create a XML fix for Mac.

- Andreas [kiel (at) spherico.com]

Spherico
http://www.spherico.com/filmtools

"He who fights with monsters should be careful lest he thereby
become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will
also gaze into thee." - Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil


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Peter Garaway
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 11, 2016 at 5:41:05 pm

Hi Richard,

I may have missed it but I didn't see an email from you with the sample file and the xml if possible. We would be happy to take a look.

Thanks ,

Peter Garaway
Adobe
Premiere Pro


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Cameron Bill
Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
on Oct 14, 2016 at 6:36:23 pm

Great info everyone. Thanks for all's advice as I am battling the exact same issues and am frustrated that my TC burns for the past year appear to be off by a few minutes.

I have some more info that might help.

  • In short, yes there is a major bug it seems with the Adobe family reading AVCHD 23.976 footage timecode.

  • To get the correct TC, you'll need to use Prelude or the Media Browser to access the original footage from the SD card (or from within the PRIVATE file structure. - It seems Adobe correctly sees the TC if the footage is within the metadata file structure mess of the AVCHD media.

  • Alternatively, you can open the AVCHD footage in any other Quicktime based application (FCPX, compressor, Resolve, etc that is NOT Adobe) and export as a ProRes or equivalent master file that can support timecode. You can now import this ProRes file into Premiere and it will have correct timecode.


  • Again - Adobe does not read native AVCHD timecode correctly if the clips are re-wrapped and outside their PRIVATE file structure.

    Here's my data:



    Source footage is AVCHD 1080p 23.976 from Canon C100. Notice the incorrect TC of 14:55:39:11 in methods 1 and 2. Notice the correct TC of 14:56:33:05 in trials 3-6.

    01 - I ingested/copied into FCPX (from SD card to our SAN). FCPX said TC was 14:56:xx:xx. Imported that exact same AVCHD clip (from inside the FCPX original footage folder) into Premiere. Premiere said it was 14:55:xx:xx. Wrong.

    02 - Tried using Media Browser in Premiere to import the AVCHD footage from the FCPX library. 14:55:xx Wrong.

    03 - Used Media Browser to import the footage FROM the source SD Card. Read as 14:46:xx. Correct! It likes having that metadata to help it from the PRIVATE folder. Always keep this PRIVATE folder structure intact!

    04 - Prelude transfer from source SD Card -
  • Correct.
  • This just copies over the clips WITH their folder structure and PRIVATE folder to your destination.

    04a - Prelude rewrap with Quicktime FAILED. Again, I could not get Prelude to just rewrap the AVCHD footage as a .mov and ingest it. I'm guessing this has roots in our TC problem as well.





    05 - Prelude transcode from source SD card to ProRes worked with 14:56 TC. Correct!

    06 - FCPX - ingested clip into FCPX. Then exported -- cough -- sorry, shared the original file as its source format, which was AVCHD, not ProRes, but whatever, FCPX only does ProRes exporting natively, so that works.



    Brought that ProRes clip (same 1080p 23.976 settings as AVCHD source) into Premiere, and it was happy. Correct.

    Update: Testing 1 hr AVCHD df and ndf footage:

    07 - Let's see what 1 hr time coded AVCHD footage reads like, both NDF and DF in Premiere!

    I copied my AVCHD clip that had been wrapped as a .mov and changed it's starting timecode to 1:00:00:00 (1 hr) with an awesome program called QT Edit. I made two clips, a 1hr NDF and 1hr DropFrame file. Opened them both in Quicktime 7 and confirmed their starting TC.







    This is where my brain started melting.

    NDF 1hr was fine in QT7.


    QT7 saw the DF footage as 1:00:04;12.


    Hmm.... okay. NDF > DF wonkiness conversion probably happening here.

    Then brought those two clips into Premiere:



    As I expected, the NDF 1hr AVCHD clip was NOT ready properly and had a starting TC of 00-:59:56:09. Is four seconds of sync drift per hour is about right for NDF/DF offset? Methinks so but speculating.

    The AVCHD DF file, however, had the original (wrong) TC as the beginning TC. (14:55:xx). Hmph. I'm stumped and not smart enough at this hour to tackle this issue. But whatever, I now have some good options and I know what NOT to do -- Adobe + Rewrapped AVCHD = NG!

    I look forward to hearing any thoughts or questions, wisdom, etc!
    cb


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    Jeff Coleman
    Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
    on Oct 17, 2016 at 7:07:32 pm

    Holy Exasperation Batman! You must be completely brain fried by now.

    I hope this is helpful and not off-topic. Have you tried opening those files in an earlier version of Premiere?

    I noticed today importing Pan AF-100 AVCHD files that they read differently between CC2015.3 and CC 7.2.2

    Ingesting via the Media Browser or Prelude the file comes into the project showing a framerate of 59.94 ndf. If I create a sequence from that .mts clip, the sequence is also 59.94 ndf. If I drop a timecode filter on to the clip in the sequence it displays 60 frames of timecode ndf. The next part is what's different between the versions of Premiere:

    In 2015.3 - the Source Viewer or the metadisplay timecode track display in the Program Viewer shows the clip as 29.97 ndf timecode. For every two frames I jog in the sequence the timecode of the source track/clip moves 1 frame. If I load the clip in the Viewer it only shows me 30 frames of timecode. So the timecode filter shows 60 frames but the metadisplay and the Viewer only show 30.


    In CC7.2.2 - I get all 60 frames of timecode in the metadisplay and in the Viewer. So the timecode filter shows 60 frames and the metadisplay and the Viewer show 60.

    Perhaps that's an intended revision of the program, but strikes me as a bug. I should be able to load a 60frame clip into the Viewer and see all 60 frames of timecode. That strikes me as the later version of Premiere not handling the timecode of an AVCHD clip as well it did in a previous version. Seems something has changed under the hood.


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    Todd Pretre
    Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
    on Jan 29, 2017 at 2:44:25 pm

    Hello all,

    I'm on a PC and have just encountered the same original problem stated above in PP 2017. I did a project a month ago with no issues shooting dslr 24p. Now I'm seeing timecode problems. I always bring in video through the Media Browser. The long and short of it, this is costing me time I don't have (like any of us do, right?) and money that was not budgeted for the project...all for something that has always worked in the past. Simply stated, I'm wondering why something as basic as timecode in video editing software can be as incorrect as this.

    I'm shooting two cameras: EX3 and 5dMkIII. My onsite producer always takes notes via a monitor on site to expedite logging material in post. The timecodes she took down during interviews via direct camera output are NOT what the
    timecode effect is displaying in Premiere 2017. The first shooting day, she logged timecode from the 5DMkIII. Those timecodes did not match at all. The second day (a week later), she logged the timecode from my EX3, as I figured it was a camera issue. These timecodes were even more incorrect.

    The 5D kept a running time in PP, just that the numbers were way off. For the EX3, PP starts each clip in the timeline at 00:00:00:00, no matter if the clip begins one hour and 42 minutes into the timeline and even interviews that began somewhere in the 02:10:12:09 timecode area. The timecodes read the same in the source window and in the timeline...at least that's consistent, thought it's entirely incorrect an not a help in the process.

    I see all the technical info at the top and I applaud you all for that time put in and information learned. I'm not nearly as savvy. If I can provide material to aid in a fix (since I have different formats than mentioned above), I'm happy to do so. As a company of one with a busy schedule, I'm sorry to say it's very difficult to invest time in multiple processes described above which have not lead to a fix. I know, I know, we are all in that boat and I'm not intending to say "poor me." This is why I'm very appreciative of those who can work towards a fix and I'm thankful for those who dedicate many hours to help out the masses.

    Currently, I'm recreating the project in 2015.3 and am not having this issue. Timecodes are working as they should.

    On a somewhat similar note, every time I ingest in PP 2017 I highlight all clips in the Media Browser and drag them into my project. All files transfer EXCEPT the first clip in the list (which is highlighted). I always have to go back and drag that first highlighted clip into my project separately. Is anyone else having that issue as well? It happens with every ingest I do.

    Again, thanks to you all for your efforts detailed above. If I can be part of the fix, I'm happy to help when and where I am able. I look forward to future posts and following this thread.

    Thank you to you all.

    Todd


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    Richard Clabaugh
    Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode NEVER RESOLVED
    on Feb 8, 2017 at 5:13:28 am

    Just to return to this since I started it and I see others are also still having this problem...

    I had to drop dealing with it and just get the project out by manual conform/brute force, but I did begin to make some connections - none of it very useful for most of us.

    There were four ways to digitize material that I triedL
    1. Via Final Cur Pro "Log and Transfer"
    2. Via Sony XDCam Transfer program (this is what I most often use)
    3. Via Premiere Pro 4 directly
    4. Via DaVinci Resolve (I usually do that only if I need to apply a LUT, which was not the case here)

    The one that seemed to work best was if I digitized using Premiere Pro. Whatever timecode it created on import it than recognized and exported an XML that was consistent with itself, although not with what other programs read for the same material. All other programs still had a problem with it, but this produced the best results.

    I consider this an unsolved bug as of that time. Have not done a project of this workflow since November, so have not checked it with the latest Premiere Pro. (Last thing I shot was on an Arri Alexa and I'm not editing it).

    I just didn't want to leave everyone hanging and not knowing how it turned out.

    Hopefully someone will resolve this.


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    Tory Stewart
    Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode NEVER RESOLVED
    on Mar 1, 2017 at 9:15:04 pm

    Hi all,

    Chiming in to report that I'm having the same problem and it's making me tear my hair out. Finding this thread at least has given me the relief of knowing I'm not crazy! I'm working on a long doc and this bug is affecting about half of my media.

    I'd transcoded a lot of footage shot on the C100 to ProRes 422 (23.976fps) using Log & Transfer in FCP7, from disk images of the original cards, keeping the entire card structure intact. I added metadata, and synced using Plural Eyes before migrating the project to Premiere via xml. All seemed well. Since the migration to Premiere, I've transcoded all new footage using Prelude and imported to the Premiere project via the Media Browser.

    Since I'd heard negative things about merged clips, I instead made multicam sequences to link the dual recorded audio to the video clips and modified the audio channels on the multicams to reflect my preferred arrangement. This after losing a bunch of time modifying the audio channels on the video and audio clips themselves BEFORE making the multicams, only to find that offlining and relinking media knocks out those channel modifications and restores them to the file's default.

    While making multicams from the synced up sequences (that I'd imported from FCP7 via xml) I noticed that many of my video clips on the timeline were a frame or two or three out of alignment. The placement of the clips on the timeline was correct, but there were diagonal lines/dead frames at the head of the clips. Slipping the clips solved the problem, but sure enough when I checked the timecode I discovered that the problem was that Premiere was reading the start TC typically 1 to 4 frames later than was correct. It seems to be completely erratic, other than that it's limited to clips that were transcoded in FCP7.

    As Richard stated, every single other application I have installed that can read timecode reads the "correct" timecode, and Premiere and Prelude read the incorrect timecode. Not only that, but the incorrect timecode doesn't even stay consistent on the clips themselves. After offlining and relinking several times, the timecode on the offending clips slipped even more. I modified the timecode in Premiere and checked to see if it affected any other programs and it did not, aside from Prelude. However, I have hundreds of clips that came over from FCP7 so double-checking all the timecodes against my old FCP7 project seems like it will take forever, and feels daunting and possibly futile since who knows if that will actually prevent the bug from manifesting again down the road.

    The only minor success I had was relinking clips in Premiere after "modifying" the timecode in FCP7. I copied the original start TC, changed the TC to something else, closed the modify window, reopened it, pasted the original start TC back in, closed the window, and confirmed that the file read as having been modified at the Finder level. I opened a dupe of the Premiere project with all the media offline, reconnected, and the incorrect timecode in Premiere changed to reflect the correct timecode. If I open those clips in Prelude, Prelude now reads the correct timecode. I thought this might be the solution but sadly it doesn't seem to be sticking. I'm not sure what happened but after working in the project for awhile I noticed the clips were again registering the wrong timecode.

    Very interested to hear if anyone's made any progress or had any insights since last month.


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    Paul Whitfield
    Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode NEVER RESOLVED
    on Jun 25, 2017 at 1:14:28 am

    I too am having TC problems with PPCC 2017 .1.2 on a Mac and ADOBE TECH SUPPORT SAYS "YOU MUST TRANSCODE YOUR FILES TO MP4 CODEC for it to work correctly in Premiere Pro."
    There is definitely a TC problem with Premiere Pro but Tech Support wont admit it. I sent them a file to test and it worked on their windows os but not on a Mac. They did at first say it was a bug but then called me right back and changed their story to "its your files, transcode them."

    My files are QT uncompressed video at 23.976 created in After Effects.
    The TC from the files work perfectly in FCP7, QT player, and Resolve but in PP things go astray.
    They usually start off ok but if I add a marker, the TC displayed for the marker does not match the TC displayed by the Source monitor. The difference is random. The TC overlays showing source TC is wrong. If I open the Modify-Timecode menu the original TC has changed. Revert does nothing. Manually changing the TC to be correct does nothing.

    So I trash the project. Trash the files on my work hdd and copy the file from a backup. Start again and after a few minutes working in Premiere, yep wrong TC is back. But only in Premiere. After Effects is fine with the files, so is Bridge, FCP, Resolve, QT.


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    Jay Smith
    Re: Premiere Pro Reads Incorrect Timecode from Source-Makes Bad XML
    on Jun 27, 2017 at 4:16:13 am

    I've encountered the same problem. I've been experimenting with using Davinci Resolve to us Scene Detection to break up a video into small chunks to edit in premiere. I export the cut timeline from Resolve as an xml and import it into Premiere/After Effects and the source footage is shorter than Resolve says it is by about 1 second. The timecode is different. I'v been messing with this all day.

    At first, I thought it was a Variable Frame Rate Issue. After running it through Handbrake, there is no change. The problem persists. I've tried different frame-rates as well.

    Currently, I'm using Media Encoder to create a new source for Resolve's Scene Detection. If it works, it may confirm that the problem is with Adobe. Which would bring relief that I know the problem, but sadness that this problem exists. I remember using AME earlier today and I think I had success, but did not realize what exactly "fixed" the issue. I'm not sure it did. I will find out though. I don't have another NLE to rule out it's not premiere.

    I can import the xml back into resolve without issue. The xml itself, near as I can tell, is fine.

    If it is Adobe, I hope it can be resolved soon.


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