ADOBE PREMIERE PRO: Tutorials Forum Articles Podcasts Basics Forum Creative Cloud Debate

NEW TO PREMIERE- Will A DOC Survive Natively

COW Forums : Adobe Premiere Pro

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Romina ReyNEW TO PREMIERE- Will A DOC Survive Natively
by on Jan 23, 2016 at 7:41:06 am

Hi All,

Me and my director are relatively new to Premiere and we are embarking on the long arduous road of putting together a documentary. In the past it has always been my prerequisite to transcode especially when dealing with different formats and such. Now that premiere is able to work natively I am just a bit weary of staring the editing process only to regret not transcoding from the start.

We have about 8-9 TBs of Footage including C300 and 5D.
We also have photographs which will be animated and graphical aids.

I was wondering if I should edit this feature on my iMac (Using Yosemite and Premiere 2015) natively knowing that there will be nested sequences for multi-cam and all other things that can make a timeline chunky, Or should I Transcode the footage and then online once the cut is done?

Thank you for all your help and any advice you may have as far as workflows.

Romina


Return to posts index

Bob RichardsonRe: NEW TO PREMIERE- Will A DOC Survive Natively
by on Jan 23, 2016 at 5:59:07 pm

When editing multicam, it has been my experience that files in some interframe codecs (such as AVCHD), the longer the clip length, the slower the editor is for basic operations such as starting playback as you get further and further into the multicam clip.

For clips of less than 15 minutes in length, this does not seem to present a problem. But if you have interviews that have gone on for 45 minutes or an hour or two, consider transcoding just those, for improved editing performance.

If you use a camera which resets clip numbering from zero (such as AVCHD cameras again), which can generate a lot of clips on your drive with the same filename (but in different folders), Premiere has been known to lose track and sometimes associate the wrong audio with the wrong video, and it's difficult but not impossible to recover from that when it happens. If you have such footage, it is best to use a utility to transcode AND name your files uniquely.

I'm currently cutting a doc for a client, with 20+ interviews which will be 30-40 minutes in finished length. Have been working on it for about 8 months. There are other bugs which I've encountered but I won't mention them here as they seem to have been addressed in the latest versions of Premiere CC.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]