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Gun for hire required $100 offered for what should be a short conversation

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Gerry MoffattGun for hire required $100 offered for what should be a short conversation
by on Jun 8, 2015 at 11:39:09 pm

Prior to starting my first big edit on PP I have a couple of questions regarding working with multiple frame rates on my project timeline. I'm specifically interested in learning more about working with 23.976 as my base and adding 29.97 on the same timeline. Do I need to batch convert prior to editing, can render as I go? What about twixtor? I'm concerned about bogging down my system and looking for some input on creating a "film" look... I realize time is valuable. That said, there anyone knowledgeable and patient who can walk me through my questions for $100... I'd like to proceed by phone...

gerry@moffatt.net

Gerry Moffatt


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Shane RossRe: Gun for hire required $100 offered for what should be a short conversation
by on Jun 9, 2015 at 2:40:38 am

Simple. Make a 29.97 timeline. Drop the 23.98 footage onto it.

Done. Where's my $100?
:)

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Robert WithersRe: Gun for hire required $100 offered for what should be a short conversation
by on Jun 9, 2015 at 2:53:52 pm

Gerry says he wants to work with a 23.976 base and and add 29.97 footage to it. So why are you advising him to do the reverse and what is the benefit of that and what would be the implicatons for post flow and release?
Thanks for any free elaboration :-)

Robert Withers

Independent/personal/avant-garde cinema, New York City


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Shane RossRe: Gun for hire required $100 offered for what should be a short conversation
by on Jun 9, 2015 at 4:30:16 pm

WHOOPS! Well, I guess I don't earn that $100.

Same applies to adding 29.97 to 23.98...pulldown will be removed. But how well? If footage is interlaced, and not really meant to be 23.98, it's not going to be as smooth as true 23.98 or 29.97 with pulldown...it'll be jittery in a slightly different way. If you wanted the film look, you should have shot the film look.

There are plugins to help with this...at least in FCP 7 land. Nattress had a film effect plugin that did a great job. See if it's available for Premiere Pro.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Dennis RadekeRe: Gun for hire required $100 offered for what should be a short conversation
by on Jun 9, 2015 at 11:17:17 am

Hi Gerry,

Premiere Pro resolves all of the frame rates both during RT playback and during your final encode and handling any cadence issues without any intervention by the editor. As far as 'film' look, that's just too broad a description in my experience, since you don't mention anything about grain, color, post fx like a vignette, etc. All of those may contribute to a film look...or not...

Premiere Pro itself supports Speedgrade LUTs or .look files and in our forthcoming release has an expansive, completely new color workflow that I think is pretty amazing (and I'm a jaded Adobe employee!) Speedgrade itself is a full on grading tool with all of the trimmings. All that to say, that I think you can get good quality results based on what you're looking for today and in the future.

Best of all, I won't charge you $100.00. ;-)

Cheers,
Dennis - Adobe guy


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