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Premiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.

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Joseph TesePremiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.
by on May 13, 2015 at 6:10:40 pm

We have 4 channels of audio, sometimes 5 or 6 channels (composing of onboard audio, lavs, booms, etc). All these channels are in ONE wav file.

I want premiere pro to interpret this data so that it only uses up ONE track on the timeline, while still having all of the channels heard within that track.

I watched this tutorial, thinking it would answer:
http://tv.adobe.com/watch/short-and-suite/mapping-audio-channels-in-premier...

However, for some reason I can't find an option to do what I want. Am I missing something in the Modify Audio Channels window? I can set the number of tracks to 1, however, it's not allowing multiple channels..

Now, if this IS possible.. Can I still edit each channel individually in premiere?

I appreciate your response and knowledge.
Thanks.


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Declan SmithRe: Premiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.
by on May 14, 2015 at 12:37:51 am

Hi

There are a number of things going on. To be able to have a single adaptive track with multiple audio channels you will also need to make sure that your sequence is set to multi-channel. This can start to make things a little odd, and how to set up your audio mix will depend on your desired workflow.

Lets start with the basic setup, to be able to drop a single multi-channel audio file on the timeline and have access to all channels simultaneously.

1. Ensure that the audio channel setup for the clip is set to adaptive. The example I have used is an audio file with 7 channels.
Before - Audio file has 7 channels but if dragged to the timeline, would cause 7 separate audio channels.


After - Select Adaptive, the rest of the settings should be automatic.


2. Now create a sequence that will use multi-channel audio. When creating the sequence, select the tracks tab, then change the Audio Master from stereo to multi-channel. Select the maximum number of channels you expect (you can change this later if you really have to, but it's best to do it now)


3. Now drag your file onto the timeline. If you right click it, you will see all your channels. You will notice that when you play the timeline, multiple channels are displayed in the mixer windows. If you only have a stereo sound card you will only hear what is on channel 1&2 (stereo) and the other channels ail simply light up like a pretty christmas tree.


4. If you want to hear all your channels at the same time on the same left and right, then click on the channel assignment button then in the drop down select the channel(s) you want to output:


The main problem with this approach is that you don't have separate control over each of the channels, they all act as one unit. So any effects you apply apply to all the channels, and volume you change applies to all channels. I prefer using two channels (standard) and specifying exactly which ones I want to use. If I happen to need more then I make a copy on the timeline and select the additional channels.

e.g.

Initially setup as two channels, defaulting to 1 & 2


Now drag it on the timeline and you will have a single stereo pair. Let's say you want tracks 5 &6. Right click and change the audio channels as below:



I also tend to use mono tracks because generally speaking when you come to your sound mix, each file will need to be treated discretely, such as gain / volume, perhaps EQ etc which is why I tend not to use the adaptive setup.

Declan Smith
http://www.madpanic.tv
After Effects CS6/ FCS3 / Canon XLH1 / Canon 7D / Reason / Cubase

"it's either binary or it's not"


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Post removed by author on May 14, 2015 at 5:21:12 pm.


Joseph TeseRe: Premiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.
by on May 14, 2015 at 5:35:04 pm

Thanks for your reply.

I'm still having some trouble, though your information has helped greatly.

I set up a new sequence with multi-channel audio, and 7 channels (I will be using Audio files that have 7 channels of audio). This works fine and I can drag my audio files onto the timeline, and have all the channels play, while only using one track. Great!

However, the problem is when I begin to merge my audio with my video.

After merging I am not able to set the New merged clip to Adaptive. Why is that?


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Declan SmithRe: Premiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.
by on May 14, 2015 at 8:07:51 pm
Last Edited By Declan Smith on May 14, 2015 at 8:47:41 pm

Hi

Welcome to the joys of bad multichannel audio support! I had a similar project, although I needed to merge 5 separate audio tracks into the video. The result is the same. Premiere just fails miserably to do it properly. What I did is step outside the NLE and use standalone tools to create the merged clips. You will need to ensure that your audio clip is trimmed such that it's start point lines up with the start of your video clip.

In my case I had to use two free tools.

1. sox - This allowed me to merge my 5 standalone sound files into a single multichannel audio file.
2. ffmpeg - This allowed me to merge my multichannel sound file with my video file.

I see you are running on windows. I'm using a Mac, but ffmpeg should be available for Windows. Below is the command line I used to do the audio merge.

S002-1.MOV - Video File with embedded audio which I will be throwing away (already in my merged audio file)
S002-1_5CH.WAV - Merged 5 channel audio file

ffmepg -i S002-1.MOV -i A_S002-1_5CH.WAV -channel_layout mono -vcodec prores -acodec copy S002-1_mc.MOV

This results in the merged file called S002-1_mc.MOV

When this file is imported into premiere it is correctly interpreted and the adaptive setting is available.



This has been the only way I was able to reliably create merged video clips quickly.

Declan Smith
http://www.madpanic.tv
After Effects CS6/ FCS3 / Canon XLH1 / Canon 7D / Reason / Cubase

"it's either binary or it's not"


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Joseph TeseRe: Premiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.
by on May 15, 2015 at 2:47:29 pm
Last Edited By Joseph Tese on May 15, 2015 at 2:50:47 pm

This is simply discouraging.

I am also working with AVCHD (.MTS) Files - which means I would have to transcode them to Quicktime in order to to merge via ffmpeg?

Surely, there must be a God whom I can call on in my time of need -
"TAKE ME FOR YOUR GLORY!"


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Declan SmithRe: Premiere Interpreting Audio So It's One Track, with Multiple Channels.
by on May 15, 2015 at 3:55:06 pm
Last Edited By Declan Smith on May 15, 2015 at 4:06:29 pm

NLE's always throw up problems at some point but there are usually solutions or workarounds. ffmpeg and sox are extremely capable tools and coupled with scripting can be very powerful and solve many 'codec' or batch type operations.

ffmpeg can convert between AVCHD (.MTS) files and MOV and use external audio, all in one command line. For example:

ffmpeg -i 00004.MTS -i 00004-8ChannelMerged.WAV -channel_layout mono -vcodec h264 -acodec copy 00004.mov

This will result in a H.264 Quicktime file with 8 channels of audio.

I appreciate it can be a bit of a minefield and you will end up with quicktime files, but that is no problem for Premiere Pro. In the command line above I elected to use h264 codec instead of prores in the previous example.

Declan Smith
http://www.madpanic.tv
After Effects CS6/ FCS3 / Canon XLH1 / Canon 7D / Reason / Cubase

"it's either binary or it's not"


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