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Marvin MackAdobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 9, 2015 at 7:46:00 pm

Hello,
I have edited an hour and twenty min long piece. It renders and plays in the time line but for some reason when i try to render it out in H.264, at a relativly high bit rate it take 22hr, will not open, and says that my file size is 4KB, Which i know cannot be correct.

This is the first time I have tried to render out a video this long. Does any one have any tips i could use to help render this file out correctly!


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Joe Barta IVRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 9, 2015 at 8:33:22 pm

Try exporting from Premiere into a better codec like ProRes. It will still have to re-render all the effects when exporting, that takes time. once you have the master file, then convert it to h.264 or any other compressed format.

Joe

Living the SuiteLife!
Stuff for editors http://www.cafepress.com/suitelife

http://www.facebook.com/pages/SuiteLife/1524456414462851?ref=hl


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Marvin MackRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 9, 2015 at 9:30:00 pm

Thank you for responding Joe!

When I get the ProRes master file should I place it back into Premiere pro and into Encoder to convert it to H.264, or should I try another process?


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Joe Barta IVRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 9, 2015 at 9:35:45 pm

Use the ProRes master file in Adobe Media Encoder to make the new files. No reason to take it back to Premiere.

Joe

Living the SuiteLife!
Stuff for editors http://www.cafepress.com/suitelife

http://www.facebook.com/pages/SuiteLife/1524456414462851?ref=hl


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Ht DavisRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 10, 2015 at 7:33:48 am

First, define your target.

Youtube:
Remember who's going to be looking at this--the average person has 10-20mbps downstream with a 1-10mbps upstream. Set your video to 15mbps max for 1080p (aim for around 8-10 as your target, min 4, max 12 with basic motion; target 12 and max 15 for sports action). I've had great results with those settings in h264.

For blu-ray:
It will take a great deal of time to encode; check your input. If you have Progressive input, it has to interlace the output, so it will take more time. I output to prores (smaller projects get proresLT) and then go to COMPRESSOR to output to AVCHD format (it allows progressive video to be burned to bluray; and it will work in encore).

For other methods:
Define your target clearly. If you are trying to compress for a set bit rate, your best bet is to first output a larger or lossless format, and then compress that with a single pass (these files work great with single pass and compress about the same whether single or multiple, which I attribute to more accurate frame information for the algorithm to use). IF you are using a high bit rate, find the profile setting that matches (there are several h.264 profiles, i.e. 4.1, 4.2 etc, and they have their own compatible bit-rates for their use, which will go a long way toward making sure players can actually play the video correctly and read a functional header). It would be good to match the resolution and bit rate to the h.264 profile level (high or main with the version 4.1, 4.2 etc) that is either just above or exactly matches your output needs.


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Marvin MackRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 13, 2015 at 4:36:54 am

Hello Ht,
Thank you for your input.
This Video will be broad casted on television. For the most part this video will be burned on to a DVD.
Do you still suggest the Blue Ray Render method that you suggested earlier?

Here is a screen shot of how I usally render my projects. But as I said befor this is the first time I have tried to render a project of this length.



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Ht DavisRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 14, 2015 at 12:29:54 am

<"Thank you for your input.
This Video will be broad casted on television. For the most part this video will be burned on to a DVD.
Do you still suggest the Blue Ray Render method that you suggested earlier?

Here is a screen shot of how I usally render my projects. But as I said befor this is the first time I have tried to render a project of this length.">

I see several issues here. Blu-ray and DVD have Drastically different requirements. Are we talking playback on a blu-ray player or a DVD only player?
The reason I ask is because you CAN use a DVD disc to hold Blu-Ray Video. However, this has different requirements of it's own also.

Blu-ray plays at a rate between 20-40mbps, and can be set to variable data rates to retain quality across the video, while getting the best compression possible to fit the disc. It can use Mpeg2 streams or H.264 encoding streams to compress and h264 will compress the files smaller, with better quality. It uses PCM or AC3 audio streams but is most compatible with AC3. With AVCHD streams (not available with adobe media encoder), you can use raw streams with progressive video at higher resolutions. It is, however, recommended that you make two encodes. One standard SONY\Phillips Blu-ray standard (720p or 1080i max resolution), and one with your progressive encode. AME will not help you with that. Use another encoder with AVCHD encoding capability, or the professional x.264 plugin to encode two video streams, and one audio stream.

DVD has a max roughly 10mbps for video and audio together, and it's safer to set around 9 for the max, with a variable data rate; DVD uses MPEG2 elementary video and either PCM or AC3 based audio (most compatible is basic AC3 audio stream). The max resolution is 720x480 progressive\interlaced (though most early players only supported interlaced formats).

A Blu-ray 5 or 9 (blu-ray burned to dvd) has a max of 15mbps for audio and video, uses H264 compression, and all other aspects are the same as blu-ray standards. Progressive video will be smaller and sharper than interlaced, but interlaced gives the more cinematic motion in the encoding.

I use Compressor to encode 2 streams (using two computers or more across a network) to encode most of my blu-ray, as it allows the AVCHD blu-ray formats (progressive video and higher resolutions\data rates), as well as a standardized Blu-ray format (interlaced). It also allows me to encode the audio as a separate operation so I can limit it to a single computer and save compression time. I then use Encore CS6 to make the discs. I start by exporting my sequences to encore, then right click and locate transcode for each one, selecting first a progressive and an audio, then making an image. Then I reset status, and do the same with an interlaced format. It's extremely difficult to tell the difference, but when you blow them back up, having a progressive format tends to yield sharper detail, and generally better quality at max size\resolution.

You can use handbrake with x264 and a -fake-interlace flag to build a compatible AVCHD format x264 raw stream. You can use any encoder that has an AVCHD blu-ray format encoder, and check that the output is a .264 or .x264 extension. Separate your audio and video encodings. Encore will be able to tell they are split and will let you select a file for both automatically; I've had it skip the audio input with a combined encoding, as this outputs 2 files, but lists an audio stream in the video file that is empty on it's own but holds a reference to the audio file.

For dvd, I also use Compressor for audio. I stick to AME for video encoding though. It stays closer to basic standards, and that's necessary for older formatting, as you don't know what they'll have for a player.

I've burned one or two Blu-ray 5\9's before. Quality is great, but you are limited to 720p and 15mbps for your maximums on settings. Encode the same way you do other blu-ray, just set your resolution to 720p and your max data rate to 12-13 for video in AME, turn off export of audio, and export the audio separately. High motion files will be small enough for 30min-1hour to a single layer disc (an average), and less motion will allow more time to the disc, due to the capability to compress more, as the motion areas will not exceed your chosen max data rate.

Some like a constant data rate. I choose variable. VBR allows you to maintain a quality standard across the video, while CBR varies quality and sharpness to fit the data rate in a constant fashion. Most often, I use a single pass to compress with VBR. With more motion, or variation in that motion you'll see artifacts in CBR, though it does work more efficiently with streams since it has a standard chunk sized packet. VBR works well for quality, and at the same max bit rate, you will see fewer artifacts, though you may need to raise your max bit rate to achieve the quality you want in your motion and raise the target for your standard quality. With H.264 in AME, I've found that 10-12mbps is great for 1080 maximums with standard scenes and 15mbps for motion. It relies more on playback decompression, but that decompression is based on lossy compression, so it can be done quickly without much overhead. 7-12mbps is great for 720p, and with interlaced formats, you can probably get away with a 10mbps max for 1080 or lower resolutions. 2k and above can require 20mbps or greater, which would require buffering on networks, and would probably not fit a blu-ray (sony) standard video, but might match a later avchd format (You'd really have to know their player was a recent model).


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Jeff PuleraRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 10, 2015 at 4:45:01 pm

Hi Marvin,

Can you please post a screen shot of the Export Settings window? That is often helpful in finding what may be a simple settings change to achieve success.

Also, are you on PC or Mac, what Premiere version, basic computer specs? All very helpful in troubleshooting

Thanks

Jeff Pulera
Safe Harbor Computers


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Marvin MackRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 13, 2015 at 4:44:30 am

Hello Jeff thank you for your help!

I am on a mac computer running Yosemite. I am also am using Premiere Pro CC 2013. For some reason the 2014 version has been crashing on me every 20 sec, so I don't use it anymore!
Here is a screen shot of how I usually render my projects. But as I said befor this is the first time I have tried to render a project of this length.



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Jeff PuleraRe: Adobe Premiere Rendering
by on Apr 13, 2015 at 2:05:45 pm

Hi Marvin,

How did you arrive at the ridiculously high encoding rate of 250mbps? Have never seen anything like that for H.264, could be an issue ;-)

Also, regarding long render times, you likely will not benefit from the "Max Bit Depth" or "Max Render" settings, both of which will significantly increase render times, especially on a slower computer.

Max Bit Depth is beneficial for instance with 10-bit sources, and/or applying high-bit depth color correction, but most of us will get by without that.

Max Render helps with downscaling quality. Since source and export are both 1080p, you don't need that. Uncheck both boxes.

For "Use Previews", not always the best idea, depending on what the Preview Render settings are in Premiere. When you "render" portions of the timeline to "green", this creates temp files on the hard drive. Then when you export with "Use Previews" checked, it re-renders those temp preview files into the final desired codec. The preview files may not have been the best quality, then you are creating the final export by re-ending from them.

Better to NOT use Previews (uncheck), then the final video is rendered directly from source for best quality.

Steps to success -

1) What is the purpose/destination of the exported video? Let's dial in those bitrate settings

2) Uncheck Max Render

3) Uncheck Max Bit Depth

4) Uncheck Use Previews

Thanks

Jeff Pulera
Safe Harbor Computers


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