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Most appropriate codecs to work in Premiere

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Alvaro Pascual
Most appropriate codecs to work in Premiere
on Apr 9, 2015 at 12:00:41 am

Hi, i've been working recently with Davinci resolve and premiere CC and at the moment of exporting my videos from Davinci to Premiere i made myself this question, what is the best codec AND format to work with in premiere?

I know avid and FC have their own codecs, that AppProRES is a very good editing codec, but that's not an option because i work in windows 7, it's obvious that there are codecs better suited for editing and codecs better for a final export, for visualization and such. I also know that h.264 it's not the better option still most of the DSLR just codificate the video with that codec. In fact i doubt if quick time is the best format for editing, maybe i should transcode to AVI first? maybe MXF? I just don't know.

After some time searching i found that most of the information about wich codec is the most appropriate and why is pretty vague, or too much technical... Can anybody explain wich is the best formats and codecs for editing and why?


thank you!


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Michael Krupnick
Re: Most appropriate codecs to work in Premiere
on Apr 9, 2015 at 10:03:46 am

I've found DVCProHD to be excellent. Importing the files from the P2 cards is quick and easy. Premiere handles the data like DV: it all works without much load on memory or the hardware, exports without incidents usually and renders pretty easily and quickly. The files are low/medium in size, don't take huge disc space, and display very handsomely to scaled HD up to 1080 even on a theatre-sized screen.


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Jeff Pulera
Re: Most appropriate codecs to work in Premiere
on Apr 9, 2015 at 2:50:20 pm

Working with DVCProHD is fine...IF that is the native format of your camera. DVCProHD is not full-raster, and in fact has less resolution than HDV. It is Anamorphic HD at 1280x1080, with a Pixel Aspect Ratio of 1.5 (HDV is 1440x1080 with 1.333 PAR).

So if the original camera source is 1920x1080, converting to DVCProHD as part of the workflow is going to toss out a ton of image data, taking 1920x1080 down to just 1280x1080, greatly reducing the resolution. Can't recommend that.

Thanks

Jeff Pulera
Safe Harbor Computers


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Gary Milligan
Re: Most appropriate codecs to work in Premiere
on Apr 9, 2015 at 3:47:14 pm

[Jeff Pulera] "Working with DVCProHD is fine...IF that is the native format of your camera."

I agree with Jeff. One of the beauties of Premiere Pro is that it works with most formats natively, and in the same timeline... no need to change codecs. That's not to say that you should never transcode - it depends on the project and your system, but in most cases there's no need to. What version of Premiere? System info?

HTH

Gary


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Alvaro Pascual Santamera
Re: Most appropriate codecs to work in Premiere
on Apr 10, 2015 at 8:41:32 pm

I have Premiere Pro CC 2014

My Pc specs are:
Windows 7
Intel Core i7 3.60GHz
RAM 16Gb
Nvidia Geforce GTX 660

I know that Premiere works well with any codec so i also agree that is better to work with the native native format. in fact my Premiere works pretty smooth with h.264 wich is the native format from my Canon 600D. But if i had the chance to transcode my video would it be a good idea? For example as i said first with davinci R11 it gives me the chance to pick my codec to do the roundtrip to premiere, as it is intended to edit it would be logical to choose a codec that allows me to go even faster, even knowing that h.264 works pretty well. which one would you choose?


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