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Film Editing workflow?

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Natalie BurneyFilm Editing workflow?
by on Mar 22, 2015 at 9:14:49 pm

Hello everybody,

I'm currently undertaking a research project into Film Editing. I'm specifically researching into how technological changes has effected Film Editing over the years, and how these have ultimately changed the Post-Production workflow and collaboration.

I'm struggling to find much information on linear workflows. Basically, has the change from Linear Editing to NLE had any impact on workflows, and how teams collaborate?

(Sorry, I didn't really know where to ask this).


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Shane RossRe: Film Editing workflow?
by on Mar 23, 2015 at 1:59:56 am

Film editing has always been non-linear. Before the electronic NLE, computers, editors cut on film. On Moviola or KEM or other film editing systems. You could always cut something out of the middle or add something to the middle or totally rearrange the film.

Linear editing is done on video tape, and mainly the realm of television. You'd have to edit in chronological order, one shot after the other. Want to go back and make a change earlier in the cut, say swap shots? Then you'd have to go back, do that, and then re-edut everything after that point again. No cutting or splicing to rearrange shots. That would show up visually. It was done rarey as repair work, if a tape was damaged.

So, film has always been non-linear. I'm guessing that you mean what are the changes from the time of editing on film vs computer NLEs.

I have to find this great clip from Modern Romance. It shows editing on film, and how much time it took to make one small change.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Andrew KimeryRe: Film Editing workflow?
by on Mar 23, 2015 at 3:39:01 am

[Shane Ross] "Film editing has always been non-linear. Before the electronic NLE, computers, editors cut on film. On Moviola or KEM or other film editing systems. You could always cut something out of the middle or add something to the middle or totally rearrange the film. "

I would argue that working with film was linear as well, just more flexible with regards to the physical act of making edits. While you could, to use modern terms, ripple insert and ripple delete with film, you still had to go through the material in a linear fashion. If you were at the end of reel but wanted to see something at the beginning of the reel you had to rewind through the entire reel. You couldn't instantly jump to any moment in time like you can on an NLE.


Natalie,
If you haven't already read them I would read "In the Blink of an Eye" and "Droidmaker: George Lucas And the Digital Revolution" as they both have sections that talk about how technology has changed the process of editing.


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Michael KrupnickRe: Film Editing workflow?
by on Mar 23, 2015 at 12:44:16 pm
Last Edited By Michael Krupnick on Mar 23, 2015 at 1:10:12 pm

Good thread…I think the sea change occurred because the possibility of client-requested changes to the cut is an onerous chore on physical media. So edit systems began to display previews instead of workprints. They managed these by assembling EDLs of preview chains. Workflow became a consideration when editors had to manage these lists as well as raw camera source. That was EDIFLEX or CMX offline systems.


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Walter SoykaRe: Film Editing workflow?
by on Mar 23, 2015 at 3:50:59 pm

[Andrew Kimery] "I would argue that working with film was linear as well, just more flexible with regards to the physical act of making edits. While you could, to use modern terms, ripple insert and ripple delete with film, you still had to go through the material in a linear fashion. If you were at the end of reel but wanted to see something at the beginning of the reel you had to rewind through the entire reel. You couldn't instantly jump to any moment in time like you can on an NLE."

I'd call what you're describing "random access." Linear versus non-linear is all about being able to rearrange elements after you've edited them in. Tape-to-tape linear editing is very different than film/computer NLE editing in this regard.

Film editing was non-linear, but with sequential access.

Video tape editing (with edit controllers, not razors) was linear and with sequential access.

Computer-based NLEs are non-linear and with random access.

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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Walter SoykaRe: Film Editing workflow?
by on Mar 23, 2015 at 3:52:41 pm

[Natalie Burney] "I'm currently undertaking a research project into Film Editing. I'm specifically researching into how technological changes has effected Film Editing over the years, and how these have ultimately changed the Post-Production workflow and collaboration. "

Check out this thread over at FCPX or Not: The Debate:
https://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/78850

Glenn Ficarra (one of the co-directors of Focus) has been chiming in how technology has let the directors and the editor collaborate in post.

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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