FORUMS: list search recent posts

Splitting digitized film into scenes

COW Forums : DaVinci Resolve

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Frank Lytle
Splitting digitized film into scenes
on Mar 30, 2020 at 3:49:46 am

I am new to this forum and am looking for a way to edit 8mm and 16mm film that was digitized but done in a fashion where I have one 55 minute scene that covers many rolls of film. How can I split the scenes and save in separate folders for identification and future use.?
Thanks for any suggestions.
FCL

FCL


Return to posts index

Marc Wielage
Re: Splitting digitized film into scenes
on Mar 30, 2020 at 7:25:11 am

You could do that if you pulled the entire file into Resolve, then on the Deliver page set in and out points for each segment you want to render, and enter a custom name for each segment. I would use the exact same file format used for the film scan without any color or sizing change, and the results should be "virtually lossless" depending on what file format as used.

What is the file format?


Return to posts index

Frank Lytle
Re: Splitting digitized film into scenes
on Mar 30, 2020 at 4:06:41 pm

The file format is m4v
I will try what you suggested
Thank you

FCL


Return to posts index


Damien Molineaux
Re: Splitting digitized film into scenes
on Mar 30, 2020 at 6:30:45 pm

Hi,
I'm currently doing precisely this on a project. I received a ProRes4444 scan from the lab (from 16mm film). I used the scene detection option before importing into Resolve. I adjusted where necessary, mostly removing unwanted cuts, but also adding a few Resolve did not detect.
I made a quick pass to adjust the image which was scanned flat, to have decent looking images for editing and exported proxies for editing (in ProRes LT at source resolution), and then I'm making a second export, without any grading, at source resolution and with the "do not reencode" option checked to create new source media which I will use after the editing to conform back to, before final grading. For bot the exports I use the same naming optons!

______________________________________
Filmmaker, DoP & Colorist
Based in Geneva, Switzerland
http://www.c-sideprod.ch | http://www.earthling-prod.net


Return to posts index

Tim McCallister
Re: Splitting digitized film into scenes
on May 19, 2020 at 12:15:23 am
Last Edited By Tim McCallister on May 19, 2020 at 12:24:32 am

In the vein of this thread, I too had some old B&W 16mm transferred --> 5K (3840x2880, 4:3 Aspect Ratio, ProRes4444 10bit) but unfortunately due to my naivete, it was scanned into .709 rather than .2020.

Question: Is it worth it to have Resolve remap it into .2020 for doing an HDR correction down the road? Or is this just (an analogy of) creating empty pixels that aren't there in the first place? I ask because there's a video tutorial online of how to do this, but it seems on a technical level this would be an empty exercise that doesn't provide extra dynamic range if it wasn't there in the first place...

I realize HDR mostly works best with color, but having seen the recent 4K of Halloween (1978), there's a definite wider range of Bright to Dark, especially in the outdoors sunlit scenes where the girls are walking/talking in their neighborhood, an additional ceiling I'd love to have access to. I mean, Schindler's List and Elephant Man are in HDR (albeit, by brilliant cinematographers, but still...).

Apologizing ahead of time for my newbie status...


Return to posts index

Marc Wielage
Re: Splitting digitized film into scenes
on May 24, 2020 at 6:49:57 am

[Tim McCallister] "In the vein of this thread, I too had some old B&W 16mm transferred --> 5K (3840x2880, 4:3 Aspect Ratio, ProRes4444 10bit) but unfortunately due to my naivete, it was scanned into .709 rather than .2020."

Rec709 or Rec2020 is not exactly a factor for film scans per se. The usual practice is to scan in 10- or 12- or even 16-bit Log, usually in a Lossless or near-lossless format like DPX or EXR or ProRes 444 (which can be 12-bit). Log can be corrected in a display-referred environment to Rec709 or HDR or whatever you want.

My experience is that 16mm tends to get really, really grainy when you stretch out the dynamic range to the 1000 nits or so of HDR or Dolby Vision, so be prepared for using some NR. One tactic is to apply the NR only to the highlights and be extremely careful about artifacts and loss of detail. There are a lot of factors for NR, so it's fair to say it's not a simple subject, and film restoration people often differ on how much NR is too much.

I would not worry about HDR unless you have an actual distributor demanding it, and unless you actually have a calibrated color-critical HDR display, like one of the top-of-the-line Flanders or Sony BVM monitors. HDR is challenging and not cheap or easy to do correctly.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2020 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]