FORUMS: list search recent posts

What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?

COW Forums : DaVinci Resolve

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Geoff Johnston
What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 20, 2019 at 4:11:18 pm

To start off, let me just point out that I'm not doing online editing, there is no specific workflow, this is just a one off case.

My colleague needs me to grade his short film last minute. He's finished editing on Premiere and he sent me the whole thing in DNxHD MXF.

So let me reiterate that I have to work with a baked edit of the film in this case.

What should I do about existing fades and dissolves? This film had quite a few of them and my grades don't do them any justice.

The key words here are 1) last munute 2) no time 3) baked edit

Thanks for all your dedication on this forum guys. This is the first place go when I'm completely lost.


Return to posts index

Glenn Sakatch
Re: What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 20, 2019 at 8:24:15 pm

Typically you would colour each side of the dissolve independently and add you own dissolve inbetween...matching the speed and position of the original dissolve.

Glenn


Return to posts index

Michael Gissing
Re: What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 21, 2019 at 12:14:16 am

Because it is baked in you need a dynamic keyframe across the dissolve between the grades for the two shots. Otherwise use scene detect to break it up into individual clips


Return to posts index


Joseph Owens
Re: What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 21, 2019 at 7:22:14 pm

If a keyframed transition is not an easy thing to do... for example if there is a Power Window or a track / stabilizer that isn't appropriate for either the incoming or exiting scene... You can add a razor cut in the middle of the "dissolve" on the Edit page, then add a discrete cross dissolve overtop of it. You're just splitting the clip in a more controllable way than the auto-detect.

It's not ideal as sometimes your node tree won't migrate linearly between the two color treatments, but that's the limitation.

jPo

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


Return to posts index

Marc Wielage
Re: What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 22, 2019 at 7:19:05 am

[Geoff Johnston] "What should I do about existing fades and dissolves? This film had quite a few of them and my grades don't do them any justice."
I work on film restoration projects all the time, and there the dissolves and fades are all baked-in... because that's how film worked for about 100 years. A/B rolls are pretty rare, at least in terms of video post with film.

I just do lots of manual keyframes and time them to match the length of the image on screen. If I have a window up, I dissolve it out using window opacity or key output gain going to 0. I do tend to use a fixed node structure and have just one type of correction in each node, so it's not that hard to do. I frequently have different nodes using individual keyframes for different functions, and it's rare I add a start/stop keyframe to every single node in the node tree at the same time.

Worst case scenario, have your friend export the A-side and the B-side of the dissolve (or fade) separately and then recreate the dissolve manually in Resolve. Problem solved.


Return to posts index

Joseph Owens
Re: What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 22, 2019 at 4:26:51 pm

[Marc Wielage] "A/B rolls are pretty rare, at least in terms of video post with film."

And they have their own set of caveats.

Timed a cut/print A/B project a number of years back, where the hope was that the *checkerboard* assembly wold fit back together. What the producer did not count on was the 2/3 field cadence which destroyed the frame-to-frame correspondence and online 29.907 edit couldn't cope with -- that is matching a C- or D-frame cut on Field 2. Even if you ignore 4-field colour framing, which we could sort of do because we were not working in baseband composite; it was a DCT conform.

Same for the "2-frame" flicker-cut. In the days of conforming to 29.97 video, it was 2-3. Sorry. 4 doesn't go into 5 evenly. Even if you lay down the film with exactly the same SMPTE cadence.

But those days are gone, aren't they.

jPo, CSI

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


Return to posts index


Marc Wielage
Re: What to do when fades and dissolves are baked?
on Oct 23, 2019 at 2:01:35 am

[Joseph Owens] "Timed a cut/print A/B project a number of years back, where the hope was that the *checkerboard* assembly wold fit back together. What the producer did not count on was the 2/3 field cadence which destroyed the frame-to-frame correspondence and online 29.907 edit couldn't cope with -- that is matching a C- or D-frame cut on Field 2. Even if you ignore 4-field colour framing, which we could sort of do because we were not working in baseband composite; it was a DCT conform."
We were usually able to get it to work, at least with 35mm A/B roll dissolves. I did a couple of TV series that way, including LANCER for Fox, and because we did all those in telecine, we had to literally reach over and do the dissolve ourselves: playing back the color-corrected A-side on a tape machine while dissolving to the Rank (or Spirit) playing back the film. We sometimes had to stop and make an edit again, but it worked more often than not.

Many years ago, I did the home video transfer on EL MARIACHI for Robert Rodriguez, and that was A/B roll 16mm, but in that case I just color corrected the two sections and then sent them down the hall to an editor and let them put the pieces together. I think they had 2-frame handles on the ends to facilitate the cut, so it actually worked OK.

I do vividly remember the horror of 2:3 pulldown and do not miss it. I was doing early HD projects from 1999-2002, before 24p came out, and it was an absolute nightmare. I was very happy when 24p came in and we no longer had to deal with 1080i... for the most part.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2019 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]