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Brown Tint look

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Stephen Smith
Brown Tint look
on Jan 12, 2017 at 3:38:50 am

Any idea on how to create a tint like this one?


Stephen Smith

Utah Video Productions

Check out my Vimeo page


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Marc Wielage
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 12, 2017 at 2:14:07 pm

There are some sepia powergrade "Resolve Looks" included for free in the Gallery at the top.

There's several ways to create a bleach-bypass/sepia thing. One you could try: First node, balance the image overall then desaturate about 50%. Second node, use secondaries to bend or reduce bright blues, greens, or cyans. Third node, bend the signal towards Warm/Yellow/Brown. Fourth node, use as an overall trim.


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Glenn Sakatch
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 12, 2017 at 5:48:06 pm

original art direction helps as well.

If the girl had a bright red shirt, the boy had a bright blue shirt, and the wall behind them was pink, the effect becomes very different.

Glenn


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Joseph Owens
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 12, 2017 at 7:04:14 pm

Just a friendly warning that you should expect the Getty Images lawyers to sue the hell out of you any minute now. There are no humans involved -- they have troll bots looking for infringements. There is one famous case where they threatened the original photographer for using her own image.

Marc's approach sounds nice... You could also create a solid color on a higher layer and mix it down with opacity, and then again, desaturating and then pushing the mids brown/sepia will retain a black/wqhite balance, if that's important to you.

jPo, CSI

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Simon Ubsdell
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 20, 2017 at 5:42:57 pm

One very nice variant on the Solid Color approach is to set the Blend Mode to Color rather than Normal, and obviously adjusting the Opacity to taste.

It's an old photographer's trick that works surprisingly well for this kind of thing.

(It's even more interesting when you use a gradient rather than a Solid Color.)

Simon Ubsdell
tokyo productions
hawaiki


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Hector berrebi
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 14, 2017 at 10:03:49 am

I totally agree with Glenn.. this look is strongly helped by art/props/casting.
Using white/beige/brown props and brown haired actors helps it a lot.

That said, notice that it seems there are no blacks (darkest spot isn't at all 0) and that darkest shadows aren't neutralized but rather orange-ish.

Use an RGB picker to measure values in different areas of the frame and of your reference still.
use RGB parade and vectorscope to evaluate and match.
First node should match the contrast. (lifted shadows, lowered mids, highlights treatment is shot dependent)
Second node reduces color boost (how much is shot dependent).
Third pushes a tiny bit of red-orange to shadows and mids. Highlights are shot dependent but may require similar treatment.


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Marc Wielage
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 22, 2017 at 7:29:28 am

I did an entire feature in the 1990s that had a sepia/brown tone: Kansas City, done for Robert Altman. Very tough film, done in the pre-Resolve days. The entire look was created digitally, and the tough part was not establishing the brown look -- the tough part was keeping it consistent shot to shot and scene to scene. I think that took almost 3 weeks.


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Joseph Owens
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 22, 2017 at 7:43:39 pm

[Marc Wielage] "the tough part was keeping it consistent shot to shot and scene to scene"

For a long time, that has been the key to how a cinematographic colorist differentiates from somebody (anybody) who thinks its about making one frame look great. I'd be on the Pro Golf tour if every swing was like that one time I hit a hole-in-one from 120 yards. Only Kim Jong-IL can hit a perfect 18 every time. Or somebody else who is even better "greater" than him.

:-P

jPo, CSI

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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Simon Ubsdell
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 22, 2017 at 8:18:18 pm

[Joseph Owens] "Only Kim Jong-IL can hit a perfect 18 every time."

Is this is super clever gag based on the fact that he's also dead?

Simon Ubsdell
tokyo productions
hawaiki


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Marc Wielage
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 23, 2017 at 5:48:12 am

[Joseph Owens] "For a long time, that has been the key to how a cinematographic colorist differentiates from somebody (anybody) who thinks its about making one frame look great."
I dunno if I'd call it "cinematographic," but I have often said it's easy to make one shot look good. The trick is making every shot look good on its own and also when seen continuously with the other shots. I worry far more about the matching than the individual shots, but no question, everything matters.

The problems occur when the lighting doesn't match at all, and we have to fix it. It's particularly tough when you have shots that were done two or three weeks apart, sometimes by different people in different places, but you have to believe they all happened at the same time, same place.

But as far as the "brown look" goes, there's all kinds of looks floating around out there, particularly the trend for very "steely" blue looks or the teal/orange look. To me, you have to start by matching it all and solving any lighting issues, then you go back and apply the overall look to the scene.


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Joseph Owens
Re: Brown Tint look
on Jan 23, 2017 at 6:31:08 pm

[Marc Wielage] "The problems occur when the lighting doesn't match at all"
[Marc Wielage] "there's all kinds of looks floating around out there, particularly the trend for very "steely" blue looks or the teal/orange look. "

Typical situation is a producer/director trying to squeeze more pages into the day, jumping straight to 'cut/print/check the gate/moving on'... the crew turns the set around, and then.... they try to squeeze in one more pickup shot that should have occurred when the light/key/fill, everything, was from the other side. So now actor A's left side is lit, when its the reverse on the prior axis. Its why I wish there was a Z-axis 3-D shadow/modelling algorithm that let us re-float synthetic lighting into a setup. You can sorta kinda do that in Fusion or some other -out-of-the-app VFX, but really, its the ability to re-hang a rim or key that I want. Fill we can do, but I want to be able to define it in the subject.

Remember "green blacks?"

jPO, CSI

"I always pass on free advice -- its never of any use to me" Oscar Wilde.


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