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How do you adjust hue and sat of individual primary and secondary colors when using a OneShot chart and the vectorscope?

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Tim Wilde
How do you adjust hue and sat of individual primary and secondary colors when using a OneShot chart and the vectorscope?
on Nov 6, 2016 at 9:23:08 pm

I've got a closeup of a OneShot chart. I cannot find a Resolve-specific tutorial that shows how to adjust the hue and saturation of the individual primary and secondary chips so they'll line up with and extend to the associated boxes on the vectorscope reticule. I created six serial nodes (one for each color) and in each used the Qualifier tool to select a chip and adjust hue/sat, and it works, but I wonder if there is a better way.


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Marc Wielage
Re: How do you adjust hue and sat of individual primary and secondary colors when using a OneShot chart and the vectorscope?
on Nov 6, 2016 at 10:57:48 pm

I think you're making it way, way more difficult than it needs to be.

First, normalize the exposure so that the blacks, mids, and highlights are essentially neutral. Once you do that, bring up the saturation so that the color swatches are in the ballpark of the reticles (boxes) on the Vectorscope. Use Color Temp to help get the entire image neutral.

Once you do that, use a Hue vs. Sat to pull each vector pattern where it needs to be. If necessary, use a little bit of Hue vs. Hue. These should be in baby steps.

I don't think Qualifying an actual key is the right way to go, because the results will start falling apart in different luminance ranges. A curve is a lot softer and more subtle. Art Adams, who invented the One-Shot Chart, provides this advice:

http://www.provideocoalition.com/cameras_rough_guide_to_color_grading_with_...


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Tim Wilde
Re: How do you adjust hue and sat of individual primary and secondary colors when using a OneShot chart and the vectorscope?
on Nov 7, 2016 at 4:20:33 am

Thank you, Marc! Very kind of you to respond.

I had read Art's article earlier today but he used Apple Color instead of Resolve. The curve pictured in his article looked like a perfect solution, but at the time I didn't realize Resolve has a similar feature.

I'm unsure what you mean by "normalize the exposure so that the blacks, mids, and highlights are essentially neutral". I shot with the color balance already set, so color temp just shifted the trace in the vectorscope off center.

I've since found that the primary and secondary buttons below the hue-hue and hue-sat curves allow the kind of smooth changes in hue and saturation you recommended.



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Marc Wielage
Re: How do you adjust hue and sat of individual primary and secondary colors when using a OneShot chart and the vectorscope?
on Nov 7, 2016 at 9:29:50 am

[Tim Wilde] "I'm unsure what you mean by "normalize the exposure so that the blacks, mids, and highlights are essentially neutral". I shot with the color balance already set, so color temp just shifted the trace in the vectorscope off center.
"

Adjust the levels before adjusting color. Get the blacks, mids and whites where they need to go, and (if necessary) use offset to balance out the RGB channels.

Bear in mind many old-time colorists worked with no charts at all for decades and basically just had to wing it, based on gut reaction and experience. The charts make it easier, particularly when you're trying to get specific chroma values very close. As Art notes, generally one or two vectors often wind up a little low compared to everything else, and it's not hard to use a curve (rather than a secondary) to bring it up in a mild, not "stressful" way. The harder you push the image, the easier it is to break it.


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Peter Chamberlain
Re: How do you adjust hue and sat of individual primary and secondary colors when using a OneShot chart and the vectorscope?
on Nov 7, 2016 at 9:45:37 am

If you have a OneShot chart, just use the auto color match feature. Assuming you did not clip the image it will make a reasonable change to the image to get most colors in the range without introducing dramatic shifts. Once thats done then follow Marcs advise to trim.


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