ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS: Forum Expressions Tutorials Creative Cloud

Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?

COW Forums : Adobe After Effects

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Caroline Luz
Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Dec 21, 2010 at 5:33:55 am

Is the Canon EOS 5D Mark II good for keying?

I've seen beautifully keyed medium shot footage from the 5D online. However, I've been provided wide-shot green screen footage (from the 5D) and it's a mess. The edges are choppy and pixelated. The subject looks like they're wearing a hair net, and I can't remove all of the green (despite spill suppressor, etc.).

On the surface the footage looks okay except that it might need some minor color correction. But once you get in there via combined / screen mattes, it's painful. I'm not new to chroma keying but I can't get my head around how to key this.

Are there any workarounds for this like KeyerforDV (even though this is HD)?

Any input gratefully appreciated*


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Dec 21, 2010 at 2:15:44 pm

[Caroline Luz] "I've been provided wide-shot green screen footage (from the 5D) and it's a mess."

You don't say HOW it was provided to you. What happened to this footage before you got it? In your case, provenance is crucial: frame rate, resolution, codec.

You don't say whether the people who shot this video should have known how to light for chroma key. Bad lighting is the #2 mistake; shooting on HDV is the #1 mistake.

Nor do you say how you tried keying the footage in AE. there are several keying effects.

If this footage happens to still be in the original H.264 acquisition codec, and you do not yet have AE 10 (aka CS5), you will certainly have problems. Here's why:

Dave's Stock Answer #1:

If the footage you imported into AE is any kind of the following -- footage in an HDV acquisition codec, MPEG1, MPEG2, AVCHD, mp4, mts, m2t, H.261 or H.264 -- you need to convert it to a different codec.

These kinds of footage use temporal, or interframe compression. They have keyframes at regular intervals, containing complete frame information. However, the frames in between do NOT have complete information. Interframe codecs toss out duplicated information.

In order to maintain peak rendering efficiency, AE needs complete information for each and every frame. But because these kinds of footage contain only partial information, AE freaks out, resulting in a wide variety of problems.

I'm a Mac guy, so I like to convert to Quicktime movies in the Animation or PNG codecs; both are lossless. I'll use Apple's Compressor, Adobe Media Encoder or Quicktime Pro to do it.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Michael Szalapski
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Dec 21, 2010 at 2:27:52 pm

In addition to what Dave said, there could be issues with the actual footage itself. The camera can be the greatest camera in the world, but if there's an inexperienced operator or a bad lighting designer, it's still going to look absolutely terrible.
A lot of green spill onto your subject or a slightly out of focus shot could cause what you're seeing.
Also, as Todd mentioned in another thread, h.264 is great for compression for viewing by the human eye, but it sucks for compositing apps because they see everything. So when the compression throws away color information, it's color info AE would have had use for.

- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


Return to posts index


Caroline Luz
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Dec 21, 2010 at 3:35:42 pm

Thanks Dave,

Files I normally receive are of the Animation, ProRes, etc. variety. The people who did this shoot are ace photographers, are breaking into video, left the fluorescent room lights on, and did not have access to a video monitor.

The only thing I can tell that happened to this footage prior to winding up in my hands is that it was shot with the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. From what I've read about this camera, it heavily compresses to h.26, is not ideal for keying in the first place, and the footage doesn't play nice with the Mac. I didn't have time to research prior to the shoot, and they would be using this camera regardless of what info I found. So, I'll be masking and luma-matting my days away with this footage.

Anyone have any other info on this particular camera?


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Dec 21, 2010 at 4:28:02 pm

[Caroline Luz] "The people who did this shoot are ace photographers, are breaking into video, left the fluorescent room lights on, and did not have access to a video monitor. "

Whoops! I see the mistakes. Since they're good photographers, I think they'd appreciate that lighting for chroma key would come with its own set of demands. If they haven't boned up on it, they'd be up to speed in a short time. I think there's information on chroma key sets & lighting right here on the COW. If not, there's a bunch of useful info just a google away, but you'd need to wade through a lot of chaff to get to the wheat.

Getting H.264 video into FCP properly may not be as straightforward as they may think. Here's a good explanation:
http://library.creativecow.net/ross_shane/tapeless-workflow_fcp-7/1

If you don't run FCP on your machine, advise them to capture ProRes 422, but to export as ProRes 422 HQ; the latest version of Quicktime 7 Pro (the best 35 bucks you'll spend for the next few months) for any platform can read the HQ variant. It won't WRITE it, but you in turn would deliver in PNG codec or a PNG sequence, keeping things lossless. Yeah, they'd have to render your stuff in FCP, but no image quality is lost.

Got FCP7 on your own machine? It's ProRes 422 all the way for both parties.

I think your second go-round with these folks should go more smoothly.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Bill Davis
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 2, 2011 at 9:57:18 pm

A lot of folks have given you very helpful information, but nobody has addressed your question head on.

So allow me.

The 5d footage shot properly can and should be able to pull EXCELLENT keys.

Many of us have done it time and time again.

So if you're having problems - it's likely human/workflow errors rather than any intrinsic flaw in the way the camera operates or the digital stream it outputs.

Simple as that.



Return to posts index


Anthony Bari Jr.
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 12:48:17 am

If lit well, great for Green Screen, transcode to ProRes 4:2:2
The 422 is the color space great to pull a key. Unlike some others like HDV 4:2:0

*Production*Post-Production*
Apple Certified Instructor (Final Cut Pro 7)
"Semper Fi USMC"


Return to posts index

clyde villegas
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 4:04:22 am

Anthony, do you mean accept the h.264 in your machine and convert to another format? I'm also a bit confused on this matter.

The best ways should be to capture 4:2:2 out from the HDMI port, but as far as I know, the 5D is incapable of that.

ut in omnibus glorificetur Deus


Return to posts index

Anthony Bari Jr.
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 4:10:11 am

Yes, Convert the H.264 footage using the Canon E1 plugin,Mpeg Streamclip or Compressor.

HDMI is for monitoring, to ingest the media you just pull the data from cards intact copy the DCIM folder
onto a harddrive and convert from there.

*Production*Post-Production*
Apple Certified Instructor (Final Cut Pro 7)
"Semper Fi USMC"


Return to posts index


clyde villegas
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 4:16:39 am

Just to make sure I understand, I'll ingest the h.264 clips from the cards and convert them to ProRes 4:2:2 for use in After Effects? Is ProRes4:2:2 the best format to use in AE, especially in chromakeying?

ut in omnibus glorificetur Deus


Return to posts index

Anthony Bari Jr.
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 4:25:31 am

Yes, if you want more information choose a ProRes HQ or ProRes 4444 (best for animation) if FCP 7 is installed. ProRes 4444 clips are Huge files.

*Production*Post-Production*
Apple Certified Instructor (Final Cut Pro 7)
"Semper Fi USMC"


Return to posts index

clyde villegas
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 4:50:09 am

This is where I get confused. If h.264 is highly compressed, how can converting to another format bring back color information that was not there from the start?

ut in omnibus glorificetur Deus


Return to posts index


Thomas Morter-Laing
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 2:21:58 pm

I'm with Clyde here- I dont understand how converting it will help with the actual Key. I get that it will be easier to render and nicer to work with when converted to, for example, Prores 422, and I understand that lighting etc are massive factors, but once you have shot in H264 420 converting it to 422 wont put any information back or improve the key in any way surely? At least, thats what I was told here a while back...

:D
Tom Morter-Laing
Freelance Editor
Certified Apple Product Proffessional, 2010
http://www.depictproductions.co.uk

Sony Z5, with Rode NTG2.
iMac 27" intel i7 2.93GHz, 12GB RAM, ATI HD5750 [1GB GDDR5], 2TB Int. SATA with 2TB External HDD; (FW800), with Elgato Turbo H264HD.





Return to posts index

Anthony Bari Jr.
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 2:32:13 pm

H.264 is a finishing codec, when you edit/work with it. Its like eating a candybar with the wrapper on.

When you transcode to ProRes, you will open up the file and optimize it for editing.
All that info is stored in the original H.264 file, just zipped up and not as easy on your machine.

*if you are working with just 1 single H.264 clip you may not notice as much.

You can use the H.264 but when you bring it in to FCP it will need to render constantly.

*Production*Post-Production*
Apple Certified Instructor (Final Cut Pro 7)
"Semper Fi USMC"


Return to posts index

Thomas Morter-Laing
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 3:08:34 pm

That said though, you cant replace information. It wont be any better for green screen, it will only be better for rendering and it's effectiveness within the machine.

:D
Tom Morter-Laing
Freelance Editor
Certified Apple Product Proffessional, 2010
http://www.depictproductions.co.uk

Sony Z5, with Rode NTG2.
iMac 27" intel i7 2.93GHz, 12GB RAM, ATI HD5750 [1GB GDDR5], 2TB Int. SATA with 2TB External HDD; (FW800), with Elgato Turbo H264HD.





Return to posts index


Anthony Bari Jr.
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 3:28:30 pm

H.264 off the camera has a 4:2:2 color space
just like the ProRes 422 codec

*Production*Post-Production*
Apple Certified Instructor (Final Cut Pro 7)
"Semper Fi USMC"


Return to posts index

adam ghering
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Aug 12, 2012 at 5:58:42 am

Just to pipe in here. I agree with a couple other folk. 5d mark II records H.264 8bit 4:2:0 according to all resources on the internet. I, as well as the other resources, could be missing something. But, as a professional....I am pretty sure that the only way to get real 4:2:2 is to hack the camera using magic lantern and get a true 4:2:2 signal from the HDMI port and an external recorder. Somebody help me out with this.


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 3:35:31 pm

[Thomas Morter-Laing] "That said though, you cant replace information. It wont be any better for green screen, it will only be better for rendering and it's effectiveness within the machine."

There are other crucial considerations as well: you won't lose additional image quality. You can work in 16 bits in AE, which can be beneficial, then render to ProRes 422, a 10-bit codec, which is also good.

All this hinges on whether you run the latest version of Final Cut Pro on the same machine with AE. If you don't, you can't do this. And if you're on a Windows machine, you have very little reason to even know about ProRes 422 -- you can't even read it. ProRes LT or ProRes HQ? Yes, they're available... as READ-ONLY transcoders.

Since I have a Mac Pro at work and a Windows box at home, I often export as ProRes HQ, do AE work at home, render to a PNG sequence, and bring the result to work. Yes, it is indeed overkill, I don't get additional image quality, but I can easily put the completed shot on a flash drive. Very handy.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 3:52:56 pm

[Anthony Bari Jr.] "ProRes 4444 clips are Huge files."

Not to mention almost always unnecessary if you're going to the trouble of keying in AE.

There are far more situations where it's better to do the ENTIRE shot -- foreground and background -- in AE than there are situations where you need an alpha-channeled chroma key shot for use in FCP.

"Well, I want to have all my options open for a background when I work in FCP."

That's a lame excuse, because you're doing EFFECTS WORK, where advance planning rules, and spur-of-the-moment impulses can lead to headaches later.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Thomas Morter-Laing
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 4:10:59 pm

I thought Canon's H264 profile was 420 (as suggested here: http://www.cinema5d.com/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=22347&start=0&st=0&sk=t&sd=a) although that is only a forum so it may well be inaccurate. If it IS 422, is that the same as the 7D/ 550D(T2i) ?

:D
Tom Morter-Laing
Freelance Editor
Certified Apple Product Proffessional, 2010
http://www.depictproductions.co.uk

Sony Z5, with Rode NTG2.
iMac 27" intel i7 2.93GHz, 12GB RAM, ATI HD5750 [1GB GDDR5], 2TB Int. SATA with 2TB External HDD; (FW800), with Elgato Turbo H264HD.





Return to posts index

clyde villegas
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 4, 2011 at 11:54:47 pm

Same with Thomas, I would also like to confirm if the video clips recorded in the SD/CF cards from the Canon cameras (the 5D, 7D, 60D, 550D) are recorded with 4:2:2 color space.

And since I'm working in AE on a PC, there's no reason to convert from h.264 to ProRes 422. Do I understand you guys correctly?

ut in omnibus glorificetur Deus


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 5, 2011 at 4:05:31 pm

[clyde villegas] "...since I'm working in AE on a PC, there's no reason to convert from h.264 to ProRes 422."

That's true if and ONLY if you run AE 10 (aka CS5). If you still run an earlier version, you'll have to convert the footage to a lossless codec. Windows machines don't have access to the ProRes 422 codec, so that's out -- you'll have to choose something else.

The reason to go with a lossless codec: while it won't give you additional image quality, it will preserve as much image quality as possible.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Bill Davis
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 6, 2011 at 9:10:25 pm

You guys are largely MISSING THE POINT.

Pulling a good key TODAY is LESS sensitive to color space issues and MORE sensitive to RESOLUTION.

Think about it for a second. When we were all working with SD analog video, then the amount of information contained for EACH pixel - particularly the OFFSET between the color info pixels and the luminance value pixels was CRITICAL for keying. This is because the WHOLE signal was working with VERY limited resolution. (640x480 rasters)

Now, suddenly, you can work in a 1920 x 1024 raster - that's an INCREDIBLE increase in the ability of the signal itself to DEFINE EDGES between the INDIVIDUAL PIXELS in a picture.

So suddenly, instead of gross fuzzy edges between things - you've got TIGHT well-defined edges. And VOILA - you can KEY based on that much tighter difference!

You've got to STOP thinking you can apply SD concepts directly to to modern HD video signals such as those generated by a modern high-rez DSLR. The historical "Chroma schmutz" (my term) of SD is dwindling as resolution increases. Yes, if you want to key for a big screen MOVIE, you should consider chasing these distinctions. But for common, garden variety video - a DSLR image will RUN RINGS around ANY classic SD source for keying.

And I can tell you directly, after keying a LOT of DSLR footage - that the keys I can pull now, are ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE better than I could EVER pull back in the day of SD video.

Simple as that.



Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 6, 2011 at 9:29:10 pm

[Bill Davis] "You guys are largely MISSING THE POINT.

Pulling a good key TODAY is LESS sensitive to color space issues and MORE sensitive to RESOLUTION."


Oh, baloney. Sheer and utter nonsense.

Color resolution -- I presume you're familiar with the term -- can make or break a good-looking key. We aren't talking about color space here, nor are we obsessing about horizontal and vertical resolutions of the past.

If the resolution of an image's color component is one-fourth that of an image's luminance component, and you use a process like a chroma key that relies on accurate color information, how good do you think the result will be? Considering that HD penetration is growing, comparisons to to the bad old days of chroma keying off a Norelco PC 70 don't hold water. Viewers expect perfection, and bad color resolution results in something far less than perfection.

This is an issue totally independent of the number of pixels on a modern screen -- and on mine, I count 1920x1080 of them, not 1920x1024.

It appears you need a remedial lesson in how color information is recorded digitally. I'll refer you to a very good and easily-understood resource that explains the concept of color resolution:

http://macbreak.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=70596

You'll note that in the brief description, even the web site can't distinguish between the concepts of dolor space and color resolution. Since color resolution still varies among even HD acquisition codecs, the reference to DV is still totally germane.

I'm glad you like your 5D. It makes great-looking images. So does the Panasonic DVX 100 DV camera, if properly set up. But I'd NEVER use DVX 100 footage for effects work, and I'd want to pick and choose my situations in which to use 5D footage for effects work.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Bill Davis
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 15, 2011 at 4:15:59 am

Sorry for being late getting back to this thread, but I've spent the past six days shooting what is likely around my 300th corporate video - including incidentally - shooting green screen keys once again with my 5DMkii.

Dave, you seem to take issue with my contention. Causing me to wonder precisely what experience YOU have with pulling keys on 5DMkii footage yourself? Have you actually DONE it, or are you relying on your technical understanding of the underlying THEORY for your contentions?

Because my experiences are NOT theoretical - they are real world practical.

5DMkii files - transcoded to ProRes 422 LT keys WORLDS better than the (admittedly difficult) keys I've been pulling for 10 years from 4:1:1 DV. And are generally worlds SUPERIOR to keys pulled from the BetaSP sources I used in my early career. Transcoded to ProRes 422 (Standard) the keys are substantially better. And while I haven't needed it for my work - I have friends who regularly transcode to ProRes 444 - allow them to regularly do fine quality effects work.

I never argued that 5dMkii files were the "be all and end all" for keying. I simply argue that the excellent pixel density of these files allow for better quality keying than any solution available at a similar cost.

YMMV - and perhaps does. But I stand by my direct experiences.

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Conner


Return to posts index

Thomas Morter-Laing
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 6, 2011 at 9:43:57 pm

Lol; hey Bill, try telling what you just said to my recently aliased looking key, shot on HDV with perfect 6 point lighting and subject distancing set up by a pro DOP...

:D
Tom Morter-Laing
Freelance Editor
Certified Apple Product Proffessional, 2010
http://www.depictproductions.co.uk

Sony Z5, with Rode NTG2.
iMac 27" intel i7 2.93GHz, 12GB RAM, ATI HD5750 [1GB GDDR5], 2TB Int. SATA with 2TB External HDD; (FW800), with Elgato Turbo H264HD.





Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 6, 2011 at 10:04:58 pm

[Thomas Morter-Laing] "...hey Bill, try telling what you just said to my recently aliased looking key, shot on HDV with perfect 6 point lighting and subject distancing set up by a pro DOP..."

Sorry you had to learn the hard way about color resolution; on HDV, it positively stinks.

It's probably not the signal coming out of the camera via HDMI, mind you, but the damage wrought when that fine-looking image is encoded, and 1/4 of the color information gets tossed away. The solution: take that HDMI output into an AJA I/O Box, and capture it as ProRes 422... or even ProRes 4444!

Unlike the 5D, the HDMI signal on an HDV camera remains full 1920x1080, at 4-4-4 color resolution. However, this guy's totally in love with his 5D, and apparently thinks it can Do No Wrong.

I'd just LOVE to be a fly on this guy's wall to witness his contortions, gesticulations and blue language as he attempts to chroma key a light saber fight shot on a 5D into a virtual set.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Thomas Morter-Laing
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Jan 6, 2011 at 10:10:39 pm

Cheers Dave, yeah this one happened a year or so back and I've learnt since! Saving up for a nanoflash as we speak... Although this new atomos ninja looks tantalising. (not worried about timecode you see, idont usually need it cos of my workflow :)

:D
Tom Morter-Laing
Freelance Editor
Certified Apple Product Proffessional, 2010
http://www.depictproductions.co.uk

Sony Z5, with Rode NTG2.
iMac 27" intel i7 2.93GHz, 12GB RAM, ATI HD5750 [1GB GDDR5], 2TB Int. SATA with 2TB External HDD; (FW800), with Elgato Turbo H264HD.





Return to posts index

Terence Kearns
Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark II - good for chroma keying?
on Aug 23, 2011 at 3:15:40 am

The atomos Ninja is awesome.... if you don't have a 5DII. I believe that the EOS cameras in video mode do not output a signal that is free of overlays (at least the red record dot). They indirectly mention it in their FAQ on the atomos website.

On on this thread because I am looking at setting up a videography/photography business. I'm already an experienced photographer who owns a 5DII and a 7D. I'm currently doing some research with a view to getting a more purpose-built video camera, and colour sampling capability is way up on the priority list for me. I imagine a video camera and a hdslr would compliment each other well.

I looked at this video on Up-Converting EOS video footage


Seems like a lot of extra work, but it does seem to be effective. I'll probably do mostly wedding work, but I have also taken on a couple of other projects already. I'll probably do greenscreening at some point.

I have an IT background (software development) and with respect to "how can up-sampling add information that's not there". Think of it this way, the information is there, it's just not accounted for in every frame (due to the use of tweens) with the h.264 codec. It's been suggested to use a codec (like ProRes) by getting a transcoder to account for the colour information in every frame (or at least a lot more frequently). I don't know ProRes that well, I'm speculating. So that addresses the perception of "adding" information in the temporal dimension.

In terms of the 1:4 ration of luminance info to chrominance info, this would logically and clearly create problems when chrominance info (accuracy) is relied upon to perform some kind of mapping - ie, chroma keying. As some of you know 4:2:0 and 4:1:1 are all examples of a 1:4 ratio. 4:2:2 is an example of a 1:2 ratio and 4:1:1 is 1:1. Ideally, this is what you would use for accurate colour mapping/translation in the 2D plane.

Once again, by Up-converting, you may not be "adding information", but you're giving the file a finer (chromatic) resolution which can be used by the mapping software (effects software) to chop the image up into smaller blocks - and hence having finer edges for chroma keying.

Seems to me that the software is somewhat "lazy" (in terms of processing work) about "accounting" for every pixel in every frame on the fly. Up-Converting is just a way of "pre-accounting" to save the software from needing to rely on the CPU for extra real-time calculations.

So Thomas, Up-Converting is not adding information, it's about making the mapping task easy enough for the Effects software to do a "propper" job of slicing up the pixels.

I suspect that as CPU processing power increases, the better video editing software will have a processing engine that "accounts" for every pixel on the fly regardless of input codec. Right now they need to be programmed to be "lazy" about it for reasons of practicality.


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]