ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS: Forum Expressions Tutorials Creative Cloud

HD authoring in after effects

COW Forums : Adobe After Effects

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Tamal SenHD authoring in after effects
by on Sep 20, 2010 at 8:09:17 pm

Hi, I am a film student in India, and I have made a 25 minute diploma film, shot on 35mm. I recently finished doing the post production and managed to get a dpx 1920x1080 output of the film( i.e. in *.dpx still images at 24 frames per second). Now for reasons entirely due to budgetary constraints we converted those images to targa(*.tga) file and then imported it into after effects timeline to color correct it. My question is this- the dpx scan has a lot of black area in it(the masks at the top and bottom)- since I have never done a dpx scan before, is that how the scanning is normally done? I was under the impression that only the picture and not the mask would be scanned. Now the following photos will show you what the footage looks like in original scan, then with a 134% zoom, and finally with another mask applied to cut out the rounded edges. This is where we are stuck- what should we output it as? Because uncompressed, the output video would form almost 2.7 terabytes. What compression should we use so that it wouldn’t tax hard disk space but allow for a good Hdcam tape transfer? Finally should we not zoom in at all? I ask this because the dvd mastering that we did wasn’t zoomed in and when it was played back on tv, it autostretched to fit the screen at the sides, but when it was played back on a computer the autostretching never happened, unless you chose such options on powerdvd. I guess we are not clear on the HD mastering area. Please help.





Return to posts index

Dave LaRondeRe: HD authoring in after effects
by on Sep 20, 2010 at 9:02:49 pm

[Tamal Sen] "I have made a 25 minute diploma film, shot on 35mm. I recently finished doing the post production and managed to get a dpx 1920x1080 output of the film"

"Post Production" often means, "the project is edited, but there's more to do".

The crucial question: How did you get the 35mm film into your editing application? Details are good, especially horizontal & vertical resolution and frame rate: ACCURATE frame rate. If you mean 23.976, WRITE 234.976, not 24.

Then, how did you turn the edit into a DPX sequence?

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index


Walter SoykaRe: HD authoring in after effects
by on Sep 20, 2010 at 9:04:35 pm

[Tamal Sen] "Hi, I am a film student in India, and I have made a 25 minute diploma film, shot on 35mm... My question is this- the dpx scan has a lot of black area in it(the masks at the top and bottom)- since I have never done a dpx scan before, is that how the scanning is normally done? I was under the impression that only the picture and not the mask would be scanned... This is where we are stuck- what should we output it as? Because uncompressed, the output video would form almost 2.7 terabytes. What compression should we use so that it wouldn’t tax hard disk space but allow for a good Hdcam tape transfer?"

These questions for your film lab and finishing post house; we could give general guidance, but not the specific answers that only come from the vendors you're working with.

Since you scanned at HD resolution, you will visibly soften the image when scaling it up 134% for HD mastering -- though it should still be plenty for standard definition. Unfortunately, the only way to get those lost pixels back would be to rescan with adjusted framing.

Ask your video post production facility what mastering format they'd like. They might accept ProRes or DNxHD instead of uncompressed.

Also, 1920x1080 @ 23.976 fps at 10bit uncompressed YUV is only 200GB or so for 25 minutes.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]