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Rendering causing glitchy footage?

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Alex Kittavong
Rendering causing glitchy footage?
on Aug 23, 2010 at 9:01:49 pm

Hi All,

I've noticed when i rendered out a composition, on some parts of the footage, it would be shaky/glitchy when i know for a fact that its hand steady, meaning it was recorded by hand, no tripod. This is a factor that MIGHT cause that issue, you guys can correct me if im wrong.

The video formats im editing is MTS, raw format from a HD video camera. I probably have to convert that to an AVI?


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Michael Szalapski
Re: Rendering causing glitchy footage?
on Aug 24, 2010 at 1:05:38 pm

If you're using a version older than CS5, it is usually recommended to work with a codec that doesn't use interframe compression, yes.

- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


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Alex Kittavong
Re: Rendering causing glitchy footage?
on Aug 24, 2010 at 1:23:43 pm

Gotcha, i converted them to a Dvix AVI format last night. Someone also told me that i should convert it to the dimensions i have set for my project. For example, my project is 1280 x 720 and the video is 1920 x 1080. I converted it down to 1280 x 720. Good practice?


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Michael Szalapski
Re: Rendering causing glitchy footage?
on Aug 25, 2010 at 3:16:45 pm

I wouldn't convert video down before I brought it into After Effects. What if you wanted to stabilize it? What if you wanted to reframe the shot?

You want as many pixels as possible to work with in AE.

Also, DIVX is a terrible codec to choose. For your intermediate codec you want a lossless one.
Intermediate codec: a codec used during the editing process between capture and final output.

The downside to a lossless codec is that the file sizes are very large compared to compressed codecs, but the upside is you don't lose quality. Uncompressed AVI tends to have huge file sizes compared to a compressed video. A popular lossless codec lately has been Quicktime with the PNG codec (note: NOT a PNG sequence), it has distinctly smaller file size from an uncompressed AVI and is still lossless.
Also, don't be surprised if you render a lossless file and then you can't play it back in Windows Media Player or Quicktime without it being stuttery. Unless you have a RAID setup, it's possible that your hard drive won't be able to play back the video file in real time. Don't worry, when you encode your final video, your editing program or encoding program will be able to handle it just fine.

Also, as to rendering, let me share advice from my friend, Dave LaRonde:
Dave's Stock Answer #3:

Don't use AE to compress files for final delivery. The various compressors are there only to make quick 'n dirty files showing a project's progress to producers, clients, the kids, etc. AE is incapable of doing multipass encoding, a crucial feature that greatly improves the image quality of H.264 and MPEG-type files in particular.

Render a high-quality file from AE, and use a different application to do the compression. Popular ones are Adobe Media Encoder, Sorenson Squeeze and Apple's Compressor, which comes bundled with Final Cut Suite. Even compressing in Quicktime Pro is better than compressing in AE.

Making good-looking compressed files is almost as much an art as it is a science. It is NOT straightforward at all. I recommend asking a few questions at the COW's Compression Techniques forum.


- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


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