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Determine maximum video size on large canvas

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Jeff KeslerDetermine maximum video size on large canvas
by on Feb 20, 2010 at 6:02:53 pm

I'm creating a grid with SD video elements in a large canvas so I can zoom into each video as they are discussed. When I drop the large canvas (say "grid"-2000x2000) into an SD comp ("final"-720x486), how do I know at what size the SD footage in "grid" is at it's native resolution in "final" so that the SD footage is not more than 100% and losing quality.
Thanks-
Jeff



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Bruce WainerRe: Determine maximum video size on large canvas
by on Feb 20, 2010 at 7:23:23 pm

if the sd file is 100% inside the grid comp, and the grid comp is 100% in the main comp, then the sd footage should be full size.


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scott novasicRe: Determine maximum video size on large canvas
by on Feb 21, 2010 at 5:16:45 am

yes, do not exceed 100% in your main comp.

SuperNova
Animation & Visual Effects
Scott Novasic
Los Angeles Ca
web:http://web.mac.com/finaleffects


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Jeff KeslerRe: Determine maximum video size on large canvas
by on Feb 22, 2010 at 7:57:33 am

Hey Guys,
I appreciate the feedback, but you are stating the obvious. Naturally I want to keep it at 100% or less to maintain quality. Maybe I didn't state my question clearly. If I have a SD clip scaled at 40% (for example) in "comp1" that is 2400px X 2400px and I put "comp1" into "comp2" which is 720 x 480, then I scale "comp1" to zoom into the SD clip, at what percentage will the SD clip be at 100%?
Jeff



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Bruce WainerRe: Determine maximum video size on large canvas
by on Feb 24, 2010 at 2:19:17 am

I don't know if this is right, but in the first comp you scale to 40% (for example). This is equivalent to multiplying the video by 40/100 (40 per cent). I believe if, in the final comp, you reverse the equation (100/40) the two should cancel out, giving you 100% (100/100, or 1:1) scale. I have not tested this to make sure, but the math seems to work in a calculator.


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