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afx-hi def work

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pierre vilmenayafx-hi def work
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 2:04:06 am

hi.

i am doing hd work in afx. i notice that i cannot really watch or scrub through hd footage let alone work in afx -hd.

it's obvious that i need to upgrade to an hd card. question is.. with all of the cards available. can anyone suggest the right card to use?

any help will be greatly appreciated.

thank you,


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Chris BrearleyRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 10:45:07 am

I would always recommend getting an nVidia Quadro FX card, especially as the newer ones are built to provide some GPU accelerated effects. I've got the 3800 in my machine at home which works well. Take a look at the range they've got and get the best one you can afford.

With After Effects you are never just going to be able to hit the space bar and watch stuff playback real time. A lot of the time you should only need to be working at 50% resolution anyway and switching on adaptive resolution will help when scrubbing through.


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Walter SoykaRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 2:54:32 pm

The graphics card in your computer has next to no impact on After Effects performance. If you search through this forum, you'll quickly see that OpenGL rendering causes more problems than it solves, and nearly everyone, myself included, recommends leaving it set off. You could spend thousands on a high-end graphics card and only get hardware-accelerated drawing of your user interface panels. Unless you need a high-end card for another application (Autodesk 3ds Max, Apple Color, etc), your money would probably be better spent elsewhere. Perhaps you were asking about a video card, like AJA's Kona, that would let you see your work on a broadcast monitor?

You haven't told us anything about your system, so it's hard to identify your bottlenecks and make a recommendation on hardware to improve performance. Are you running a PC or a Mac? What processors? How much RAM? What operating system? What kind of hard drives?

We also don't know anything about the work you're trying to do. You've mentioned HD footage -- what formats? What codecs? What kind of work are you doing with it?

After Effects isn't designed to be a real-time system, but maybe there are some workflow changes you can make to help you work faster. Are you familiar with changing the resolution and frame rate of your RAM previews? Region of interest? Proxies and pre-rendering?


Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Michael SzalapskiRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 6:03:40 pm

I'm going to take a guess here and say this HD footage is from an HD camera that uses DV tapes, i.e. HDV camera.

From the incomperable Dave LaRonde:

Dave's Stock Answer #1:

If the footage you imported into AE is any kind of the following -- footage in an HDV acquisition codec, MPEG1, MPEG2, mp4, m2t, H.261 or H.264 -- you need to convert it to a different codec.

These kinds of footage use temporal, or interframe compression. They have keyframes at regular intervals, containing complete frame information. However, the frames in between do NOT have complete information. Interframe codecs toss out duplicated information.

In order to maintain peak rendering efficiency, AE needs complete information for each and every frame. But because these kinds of footage contain only partial information, AE freaks out, resulting in a wide variety of problems.


- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


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Walter SoykaRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 6:30:51 pm

[Michael Szalapski] "I'm going to take a guess here and say this HD footage is from an HD camera that uses DV tapes, i.e. HDV camera.

From the incomperable Dave LaRonde: Dave's Stock Answer #1..."


Pierre, if you are in fact using HDV footage, see my recent post from another thread on transcoding to a more palatable format.

Michael, we ought to submit a feature request on this to Adobe: whenever a user imports temporally-compressed footage into a project, Dave's Stock Answer #1 should appear.

Joking aside, though, it's very confusing for users that the media imports successfully, looks like all the other footage in the timeline, but only works some of the time.

Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events


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Dave LaRondeRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 6:57:38 pm

[Walter Soyka] "...whenever a user imports temporally-compressed footage into a project, Dave's Stock Answer #1 should appear..."

Well, there's a tiny problem with that. I just found this on Adobe's online Help under "Supported Import Formats:

"MPEG-1, MPEG-2, and MPEG-4 formats: MPEG, MPE, MPG, M2V, MPA, MP2, M2A, MPV, M2P, M2T, M2TS (AVCHD), AC3, MP4, M4V, M4A"

Not to mention mp3.

I think there's a software developer that needs to get a grip on reality. That would be the same software developer who says it's okay to render with Open GL on.


Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


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Jason BrownRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 14, 2009 at 1:28:02 pm

Wow...that seems like a BIG miss!

-Jason


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Michael SzalapskiRe: afx-hi def work
by on Dec 14, 2009 at 2:21:37 pm

Well, technically, it can import those files.
They should put in some sort of warning that, while you can import them, you'd probably find it preferable to pry your own eyes out with a dull spoon.

- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


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