ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS: Forum Expressions Tutorials Creative Cloud

Turning day to night

COW Forums : Adobe After Effects

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Austin SteeleTurning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 1:31:47 pm

I was wondering if anyone has any experience editing day time footage into night/sunset. I am filming a fight scene and want it to look almost pitch dark out.


I was planning to follow this tutorial but just want to be sure that this will work before I film with the actors.
http://videocopilot.net/tutorials/day_to_night_conversion/

I already filmed it once but the sun set too fast so it didn't work out.


Return to posts index

david bogieRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 2:43:33 pm

Easily researched. There have been dozens of threads here on the cow and on hundreds of other filmmaking sites. Adding the filters is a no-brainer compared to the planning of the shots to avoid doing silly stuff that telegraphs "fake."

bogiesan



Return to posts index

Dave LaRondeRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 3:46:33 pm

Bogie mentions "fake", and he's not kidding! Listen to the gent!

The #1 thing to avoid: shooting in sunlight. Make sure it's overcast. Nothing says "fake" like seeing shadows typical of sunlight in a day-for-night shot.

Even if you DO shoot in the proper conditions, it'll take time to accomplish a convincing look.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index


Austin SteeleRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 3:54:59 pm

Thanks. So would you recommend shooting during a cloudy day or at sunset and risk having the lighting be different in each shot?

Anything else besides the shadows and sun I should avoid when filming? Would using a tripod make it easier in post? Thanks!


Return to posts index

Dave LaRondeRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 4:05:35 pm

Y'know, just for the heck of it, I just googled "shooting day for night". I was rewarded with a wealth of information. I suggest you do the same.

If you have to ask a question such as, "Do I need a tripod?", you've REALLY got your work cut out for you.

And don't forget this: fight scenes are intricately choreographed and STORYBOARDED.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Michael SzalapskiRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 4:55:10 pm

It is very easy for a day to night shot to look fake, as has been previously mentioned.
I worked on color correction and special effects on a promo for a university that involved a super hero.
Don't ask. (It actually turned out pretty cool and attracted a bunch more students to the university despite my doubts.)
In it, the director decided he wanted many shots done day for night.

The most riduculous shot, by far, was one that invovled a motorcycle being driven by a stunt guy going 85mph through the center of the campus. Ignoring the fact that the director needed the motorcyle changed from yellow to red, it was still a ridiculous D4N shot. The sky was in it, the camera was moving, there were several buildings with windows, over ten lampposts, and more!
I had well over 100 layers in that comp.
Each lamp required at least five layers: the lamp had to be lit, the pole had to have light hitting it, the ground underneath needed a pool of light, and the light of the lamp itself needed to be on (which also required little lens flares for each lamp).
The motorcycle's light needed to look like it was on and it needed to be casting light on the ground.
I had to light up several windows in the buildings (which was pretty much a yellow solid with a glow).
I had to replace the sky.
And every single one of these layers needed to be motion-tracked to the camera's movement. And, for layers that were completely digital (the lens flares, windows, the sky, etc.) I had to match the grain of the original footage.

And that was just one shot.

So, I have some experience and some tips:

Pay close attention to everything the two Daves said. They both have a lot of experience and they mean what they say.

For the love of God/Buddha/Allah/Hare Krishna/your monkey ancestors/the flying spaghetti monster, do your best to avoid shooting the sky. If you do shoot the sky, keep in mind that you're likely going to have to replace it and when you do, all the edges of everything it touches may have a terrible little inner glow that makes it look fake again. A cloudy sky is still a very bright thing.

If there's anything that would ordinarily be lit up at night, you're going to have to light it in post. (Lamps, headlights, windows of a building.) Sometimes (as with the pool of light under a streetlight) you can just put a copy of your footage over the top of the comp and mask where the light should be hitting to add back the light. But don't forget to light the lamppost itself. And the lightbulb. And anything that might be close to the lamp, such as a bush, tree, or building.

If your camera does move (and I suspect it must since you're filming a fight scene) remember that anything you're doing in post will have to match the moving of the camera. So, any sky replacement, pools of light, lens flares, etc. will have to be matched perfectly to the movement of the camera.

My biggest tip is to PLAN!
Storyboard your fight scene very carefully.
Shoot some test footage and practice working with it. Don't shoot your whole thing (again) and hope it'll all look alright.

- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


Return to posts index


Dave LaRondeRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 5:16:39 pm

Um, Michael, from your description of that one God-awful shot, you have a LOT more day-for-night experience than I do. Bunches more.

I've only done a half-dozen of them, all shot dusk-for-night, all locked-down house exteriors, which made the sky replacement a snap. You've been through the wars, pal.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

david bogieRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 5:45:49 pm

Nice experiential rant, Michael, hope this thread comes up often in in future searches.

One of the best examples of the worst D4N work in a feature has got to be "Miami Vice," many cigarette boat aerials.

bogiesan



Return to posts index

Austin SteeleRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 11, 2009 at 1:37:07 pm

Thanks a lot Michael and everyone. Some very good advice. I didn't think of needing to add streetlights or window lights. I'm going to try a test before we film.

Since I already filmed the scene, I know that most of the shots will have the sky in them. Including the 2 punching shots. But it will all be on a still tripod and the scene is less than a minute long.

Heres a fun edit (not the whole thing) of the scene I already filmed:






I don't have much AE experience (obviously) so I might just try to shoot it a little earlier in the evening when the sun isnt setting so fast.



Return to posts index


Chris WrightRe: Turning day to night
by on Dec 10, 2009 at 9:34:25 pm

sounds like a student project, and if you're overwelmed by all this, you can always download videocopilot.net preset package for free that has loads of free stuff, including day for night animation preset. Instead of motion tracking, he uses a gradient to fix the sky, blue tints, levels effects, etc. It's really not that bad looking.

another sky replace option is a custom project I made where you just use the matte adj inner/outer sliders that do fast sky replacements, no roto.
download link below
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=YBEKJSQ3

http://technicolorsoftware.hostzi.com/


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]