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Output Rendering

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Kate KoyamaOutput Rendering
by on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:47:46 pm

Which is the best output rendering for an animation (with graphics and photography) for a clients who'll show the video in a large HD tv screen?


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Steve RobertsRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:07:02 pm

Ignore the screen. What device will play the animation?
- hard drive?
- DVD?
- other?



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Kate KoyamaRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:49:02 pm

Hmm... I'm guessing they'll want a DVD, and also they'll want to be able to hoop up their laptop to the screen.

What would be the difference for those 3 devices??


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Kate KoyamaRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:55:48 pm

Say what would be the output for:

- playing the video from a laptop that is hooked to the tv screen

- playing the video from a burned DVD

- other options???


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Steve RobertsRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:03:58 pm

We're talking about output modules, since your Render Settings would be Best.

[Kate Koyama] "Say what would be the output for:

- playing the video from a laptop that is hooked to the tv screen"


Try Quicktime Photo-JPEG, or H.264.

"- playing the video from a burned DVD"

If you're NTSC (not PAL) your movie must be 720x480 (probably 16:9 widescreen), 23.976 or 29.97 fps. Render from AE to a high-quality codec such as Animation, then compress to MPEG-2 using something like Compressor or a DVD-authoring app. You then have to author the DVD so it plays in a way that suits the presentation. Imagine a non-technical person inserting the DVD into the drive, then what happens?

"- other options???"

I'd go with DVD. Don't forget to test the final product.





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Kate KoyamaRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 2:06:58 am

Thanks for the posts!! I have one last question... so if the video is played from a laptop that is hooked up to the HD tv screen... will the composition size matter???

because today I was making a composition that is 720 by 480 and I rendered as a quick time movie, when I played it (full screen) on my computer monitor (27 inches) the video looked really pixelated...is there anyway to fix this??


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Steve RobertsRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 3:22:39 pm

If it's playing from a hard drive, and the monitor is 1920x1080 (HD), try making the comp (and render) 1920x1080. Then compress it (try h.264) and play it back from the hard drive. If it stutters, lower the data rate until it plays smoothly.

The pixellation could be a combination of two things: low quality/data rate, or the enlargement (scaling up) of the video. If it were 720x480 and your desktop were 1920x1080, then it's being scaled up. You can't avoid the scaling up with DVD, since it has to be 720x480. However, if you're playing from the hard drive, try 1920x1080 as I suggested, and the scaling up won't be a concern.





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Kate KoyamaRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 3:26:21 pm

I see... so data....

I don;t have to import images at 300dpi right???? all my images are 72 dpi RGB (they are 72 dpi but large)

I


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Dave LaRondeRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 3:25:43 pm

A computer monitor isn't the best way to judge the ultimate quality of a video file. A video monitor is the best way.

The limiting factor is the playback device. If all you have is a DVD player, then you work in DVD resolutions. Keep in mind that you can play DVDs back on a laptop or you can project them on the side of a house.

You can make a high-resolution, lossless-codec animation for playback on a laptop, but there's still a problem. Assuming you have a way to get a video & audio signal out of the laptop -- one that a monitor can actually USE -- will the laptop actually be able to keep up with the insanely high bitrate, or will it play back the file in fits & starts?

This is why DVDs and Blu-ray players were invented in the first place. They use video files compressed to a well-defined standard for smooth playback. You want to put an HD picture on an HD monitor, AND know it will play back as guaranteed? Put it on Blu-Ray.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


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Kate KoyamaRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 3:35:15 pm

OK so from what I've been reading the best way is to set my animation in a 720 x 480 ratio (as NTSC) with a pixel ration of ???? (D1/DV NTSC (0.91) or 1.21????

frame rate of 29.97 frame per second??

Then when I render the output should be set in as a H.264 Blu ray or MPEG DVD??

Should the compression still be animation?


Sorry to be asking so many questions, but I really never went deeper into rendering...


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Dave LaRondeRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 4:32:19 pm

[Kate Koyama] "...the best way is to set my animation in a 720 x 480 ratio (as NTSC) with a pixel ration of ????"

I don't know. Do you want to make it 16x9 Widescreen? Use the NTSC DV Widescreen comp preset. Do you want 4x3? Use the other NTSC DV comp preset with the .9 pixel aspect ratio.

Since you'll be working at 720x480, making a Blu-Ray disc will get you nothing. Make a DVD. In NTSC-Land, a DVD has a resolution of 720x480. You just have to tell your DV authoring application whether it needs to be widescreen or 4x3.





[Kate Koyama] "...when I render the output should be set in as a H.264 Blu ray or MPEG DVD?? "

Neither! Render a high-quality file from AE. Do not -- I repeat, DO NOT -- use AE for any kind of compression that needs to look really good. It's fine for quick 'n dirty compression to show the client your progress, but it's incapable of doing really good-looking compression: it can't do multipass encoding, which you reeeeallly need for good-looking stuff.

Since I'm a Mac guy, I would probably render using the PNG codec. Not a PNG sequence, mind you, but a Quicktime using the PNG codec with the filter set to best. I would then use some other compression application to convert it to mpeg2. Apple's Compressor and Adobe Media Encoder come to mind. Even the DV authoring application would probably do a better job than AE.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


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Kate KoyamaRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 5, 2009 at 6:20:31 pm

what pixel ration does the bluray disc take?

I just want to make sure the clients will be able to watch a non pixelated movie..


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Dave LaRondeRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 6, 2009 at 4:19:06 pm

[Kate Koyama] "what pixel ration does the bluray disc take?

I just want to make sure the clients will be able to watch a non pixelated movie.."



If you're resolved to work at 720x480, it doesn't matter.


I'm pretty sure Blu-Ray is 1920x1080, so a 720x480 comp blown up to that resolution is going to look pretty grim anyways.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


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Steve RobertsRe: Output Rendering
by on Nov 6, 2009 at 6:29:15 pm

So if the client can play a Blu-Ray disc, work and render at 1920x1080 (square pixels), encode to the appropriate codec for Blu-Ray, make the disc and test it.

If they can't play a Blu-Ray disc, you have to go with DVD, which is 720x480.



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