ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS: Forum Expressions Tutorials Creative Cloud

Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?

COW Forums : Adobe After Effects

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
joe ger
Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:22:08 pm

Good day CCs
Anyone know why I cant Frame Blend a pre composed layer and how do I find a way around it without rendering off the footage first?

I need to change the speed of these pre composed layers in the final composition as the origianls were in their native fps.

Surely the whole point of a pre composed layer is that it behaves like other rendered footage and should therefore be frame blendable?

thanks
joe g


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:36:21 pm

[joe ger] "Surely the whole point of a pre composed layer is that it behaves like other rendered footage and should therefore be frame blendable? "

In order to use frame blending, you need footage that actually contains FRAMES. Video has frames, but stills and text layers don't, and they too can be in a precomp.
See the difference?


[joe ger] "I need to change the speed of these pre composed layers in the final composition as the origianls were in their native fps. "

That sounds like it could be dangerous. Well, bad-looking, anyways. Can you elaborate on what you're doing? Don't spare the details.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

joe ger
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 5:20:18 pm

HI Dave

Am I wrong then in thinking that AE renders a precomposition frame before it becomes a layer in another comp?

I have 4 time lapse animations shot on dslrs that were shot at 1 frame every 5 seconds and are between 8000 and 10000 frames each, making over 5mins each at 25fps 1080p.
I need to make the final film edit at under 15 minutes where they currently make 23 mins in total.
I can make uncompressed masters of each section but that will take up a huge amount of space and extra time.

thanks
JG


Return to posts index


Dave LaRonde
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:04:32 pm

[joe ger] "I have 4 time lapse animations shot on dslrs that were shot at 1 frame every 5 seconds and are between 8000 and 10000 frames each, making over 5mins each at 25fps 1080p.
I need to make the final film edit at under 15 minutes where they currently make 23 mins in total."


Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you've REALLY got your work cut out for you now; work that could have been avoided by investing a little time in pre-planning.

By taking time for adequate planning, you would have KNOWN how much time you had to cover, you would have KNOWN how long the shot actually was before you began shooting the time lapse, and you would have KNOWN the frequency for firing off that DSLR.

That is what it takes to do successful stop-motion animation or time-lapse animation. The fact that it was shot on a DSLR simply makes image acquisition easier, but it doesn't negate your duty to plan.

The best you can do now is to import those shots as image SEQUENCES. Learn how in AE's online help. You can then use a mixture of strategies: you can conform the footage to various frame rates, you can use Time Remapping, and you can use the Time Warp effect.

It will take a lot of trial and error before you stumble across the best combination to get your shots to the proper length... and you may or may not get to the point where it looks acceptable.



Dave's Stock Answer #2:

When you're out on a shoot, and you say, "we'll fix this in post" without knowing PRECISELY HOW you're going to fix it in post, don't shoot it! You'll only end up shooting it over again.

Since post typically costs three times the cost of production, fixing something in post is not a way to save money, but rather a way to spend more of it.

And, before you say "well fix it in post," always consider who's doing the work, especially if you're the one doing the editing.



Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

Jonathan Shohet
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:28:48 pm

Even though the frame blending layer switch is disabled in case of a pre-composed layer, if you the enable frame blending layer switch in the original composition containing footage, it will keep this setting when nested. You need of-course to enable the master frame blending switch for the composition as well.

Also, I would also suggest you use "interpert footage" on the original image sequence in the project panel with a higher frame-rate if you want it to run faster. Frame blending sped-up footage could result in some pretty funky/horrible results...



Return to posts index

joe ger
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:07:49 pm

thanks Jonathan
thats what I need to hear

Dave, It was not an issue of pre planning as I will use the original material as is for an art installation but the single screen edit is the result of all the best material and there was no way of knowing how long it would end up. Worst case scenario I will make it all 50% and no-one will ever know.

The issue at hand is that pre-compose should really work like a pre-render and because it is not, for what ever bizarre reason, then there should be a pre-render option as well. If something is pre-composed then it will have a frame rate already embedded in it as as such should be frame blendable!

thanks again
JG


Return to posts index


Jonathan Shohet
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:03:04 pm

"pre-compose should really work like a pre-render and because it is not, for what ever bizarre reason, then there should be a pre-render option as well"

I'm not sure I follow you on that one...
You can do that by going to the "Composition" menu and selecting "Pre-render".
However, pre-rendering is effectively exactly the same as rendering, something you said you did not want to do, to conserve time and disk-space.
The difference between Rendering and Pre-rendering is that in the latter AE automatically applies a post-render action to import the resulting render and replace usage of the rendered composition in the project with it.



Return to posts index

joe ger
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:13:46 pm

thanks i didnt know that was there but as you say that doesnt speed things up.

what i meant by pre render was the same as pre compose but where the new layer is treated exactly like a footage layer as if it had been rendered , ie pre rendered it. That would be the equivalent of pre rendering.


JG


Return to posts index

Dave LaRonde
Re: Frame Blending a Pre-composed layer?
on Nov 5, 2009 at 1:01:18 am

[joe ger] "The issue at hand is that pre-compose should really work like a pre-render and because it is not, for what ever bizarre reason, then there should be a pre-render option as well. If something is pre-composed then it will have a frame rate already embedded in it as as such should be frame blendable! "

If you import your time lapse shots as image sequences, AE will then treat the footage as having a frame rate, and then it will be able to do frame blending... along with the previous techniques I discussed earlier. You don't need to precompose then.

I don't know about PAL countries, but here in NTSC-Land AE defaults to 30 fps for image sequences. You can easily change the frame rate in the Interpret Footage settings, File>Interpret>Main.

And good luck. I have a feeling you're going to need it.

Dave LaRonde
Sr. Promotion Producer
KCRG-TV (ABC) Cedar Rapids, IA


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]