ADOBE AFTER EFFECTS: Forum Expressions Tutorials Creative Cloud

Keying a wedding veil

COW Forums : Video Copilot

VIEW ALL   •   PRINT
Adam Henderson
Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 3, 2009 at 2:10:35 pm

Hi guys. I had posted this question earlier and I thought I'd got it sorted by using the Remove Grain effect but I guess it was my 4am bleary eyes seeing what they wanted to see.

I've still got unacceptable levels of noise flickering in the veil's semi-opaque areas and I'm wondering if anyone has any advice on how to properly key a wedding veil, instead of me just fumbling around with it. It's costing me so much time and I'm ready to chalk it up to a lost cause but I only see good things if I can pull this effect off.

Any help is greatly appreciated, you've no idea how much.


Return to posts index

Michael Szalapski
A couple of clarifying questions...
on Jul 3, 2009 at 6:59:38 pm

I'm no keying expert, but I know there are some questions that are going to be asked by those who would answer you.
How well lit is your green screen? Do you have an example pic or footage clip so we can actually see with what you're dealing? How was the footage filmed? Is it on film, actual honest-to-goodness HD, HDV, DV, Beta, VHS?

The answers to these questions along with an example clip or pic should help get you the answer you need.

- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


Return to posts index

Adam Henderson
Re: A couple of clarifying questions...
on Jul 4, 2009 at 9:02:08 am

Hello Michael :)

The answers to those questions are:

The green screen was (I guess) pro grade. It was grey until it was illuminated by a ring of green LEDs mounted around the camera lens so I don't think it could have been lit any better.

I've got a screenshot here:


The footage was shot on a JVC700 Mini DV camera. A very expensive camera (ex-TV I think) but still only 720x576 (PAL). Does resolution have an impact on how well you can pull a key?


Return to posts index


Jim Dodson
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 3, 2009 at 7:50:35 pm

Andrew Kramer has a great tutorial on using colorama to pull a luma key -- which is what I'm guessing you want to do... Though this tutorial is for sky replacement, the principles will work for your wedding gown...

http://www.videocopilot.net/tutorials/advanced_sky_replacement/

This should take away your noisy edges...


Jim Dodson

8 Core Intel -- Mac - OSX


Return to posts index

Adam Henderson
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 4, 2009 at 9:47:05 am

Hi Jim. Thanks for the link. I watched the video and tried Colorama but it's not doing what I need. I've got another screen shot here just to clarify what it is I'm trying to remove from the shot:



If you look around the outer folds of the veil you'll see some grubby-looking grey areas. Once color corrected they look fine as still frames but when viewed as video the changing values from frame to frame look really noisy.

I've toned it down quite a bit with the Remove Grain effect but it's still just outside the boundaries of what's useable.

(btw, I know the flowers have keyed out in this screen shot but I've worked around that in the actual comp :) )


Return to posts index

Michael Szalapski
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 4, 2009 at 2:49:24 pm

It is extremely unlikely that you will pull a good key.

You shot this on Mini DV. DV is like food. It doesn't matter how fancy the food is, once my body processes it, it still comes out as poop. It doesn't matter how pristine the image captured on the CCD(s) of your camera is, once DV processes it, it still comes out all noisy.

I wonder if you could try something...
A layer for the bride and a layer for the veil. Do a rough mask around the bride's head and body. Do some keying work. But instead of trying to key out the veil perfectly, try using the screen blending mode on the veil layer underneath the bride layer. It's a long shot and it would depend on what kind of footage you're putting the bride over, but there's a chance it'll work.

- The Great Szalam
(The 'Great' stands for 'Not So Great, in fact, Extremely Humble')

No trees were harmed in the creation of this message, but several thousand electrons were mildly inconvenienced.


Return to posts index


Adam Henderson
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 4, 2009 at 3:40:12 pm

Hi Michael. Great DV analogy :)

Guess I'll have to try some masking. It won't be a big deal since, thankfully, the actress hardly moves during the shot. Great idea on the screen blending mode. I'll give that a try and let you know how it works out.

I don't even think it would be a problem if I had a moving backdrop to create some "something" behind the veil but unfortunately the blank plate is a five minute shot of a hospital room wall :/

Thanks for all your advice :)

Just out of interest, would you happen to know what resolution films like Transformers or Star Trek are made in? I've been wanting to set up a comp of that size to see how my machine copes.

(I'm guessing not well: dual core 2.66, 6 gigs of RAM and a 512MB graphics card)


Return to posts index

Adam Henderson
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 4, 2009 at 5:54:36 pm

You've done it! Check it out:



It looks really sloppy in places 'cause of the work done before trying your suggestion but I can say with confidence that it's going to produce an absolutely gorgeous result! Thank you so much!


Return to posts index

Adam Henderson
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 6, 2009 at 3:58:52 am

Thought I'd upload this final screenshot for comparison. It's taken me two intensive days (not to mention the 3 or 4 spent on it before you helped me) but the result's been worth it :D



Thanks again dude!


Return to posts index


david bogie
Re: Keying a wedding veil
on Jul 6, 2009 at 2:32:59 pm

Glad you got an acceptable result and I want to say thanks for closing your thread with a solution. Hardly anyone does that around here.

Don't take this personally but chromakeying does not depend upon upon only one tool. Your ReflecMedia background is a fabulous tool but it's useless if you don't have the chroma bandwidth and pixel resolution to make the keying software happy. keying through diaphanous materials such as smoke, shadows, water, or veils requires testing and usually some modifications to the set or costumes to work with the available technologies instead of trying to fix it in post.

Your thread, unfortunately, is a textbook example of almost everything we try to get folks to do BEFORE they commit to shooting for chromakeying.

bogiesan




Return to posts index

VIEW ALL   •   PRINT
© 2019 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]