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How do you export a progressive mov to interlaced and have the colour channels set to 4:2:2 as opposed to RGB?

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sam thorley
How do you export a progressive mov to interlaced and have the colour channels set to 4:2:2 as opposed to RGB?
on Jul 2, 2018 at 1:28:24 pm

Hi,

I'm trying to upload a video to Clearcast and I'm having issues trying to export my animation (all created in After Effects, no footage recorded) to the specs they require. When I try to export this from premiere, despite setting the mov to interlaced, it is still showing as progressive!

I've tried to bring the mov back into after effects and re-export from there as interlaced (I know this isn't ideal but I'm desperate to find a solution!) which worked but the colour settings only allow for RGB and not 4:2:2 colour sampling. Can someone help me please? I have after effects, premiere and encoder so if there's a different way around this - Im all ears!!!

The specs from Clearcast are as follows:

1 - 1920x1080
2 - 25 frames per second
3 - Interlaced (Top Field First)
4 - 4:2:2 colour sampling
5 - 16:9 Apsect Ratio (1:1 Pixel Aspect Ratio)

6-PCM Audio 2 channel (stereo) 48Khz 16/24 bits, Little Endian (LE)


Please help!!


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Walter Soyka
Re: How do you export a progressive mov to interlaced and have the colour channels set to 4:2:2 as opposed to RGB?
on Jul 2, 2018 at 5:04:31 pm

What video codec are you expected to use?

Ae will always tell you it's rendering RGB, but the compressor itself will take that RGB input and handle the chroma subsampling. For example, all ProRes 422 files use 4:2:2 subsampling, as the name implies.

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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sam thorley
Re: How do you export a progressive mov to interlaced and have the colour channels set to 4:2:2 as opposed to RGB?
on Jul 3, 2018 at 8:18:16 am

Hi Walter,

Thank you for getting back to me. As far as I can see, AE doesn't offer ProRes 422 as an option in the video codec panel. I'm working with AE CC 2018. I've tried using Uncompressed YUV 10 bit 4:2:2 which when put through mediainfo seems to match all the criteria requested (still waiting to hear back as to whether the file has gone through or not).


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Walter Soyka
Re: How do you export a progressive mov to interlaced and have the colour channels set to 4:2:2 as opposed to RGB?
on Jul 3, 2018 at 5:43:20 pm

I don't think you have the complete specs.

I don't have them either, but looking at this document (which may or may not be current), for reference:
https://clearcastoperations.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/205504545-CopyCen...

... you are required to use one of three specific HD formats:

HD MPEG2
Container: MXF (OP1a)
Video: MPEG2 (IFrame only)
Video Profile: 422P@HL
Bitrate: CBR @ 100Mbps

Apple ProRes
Container: MOV (QuickTime)
Video: ProRes 422 HQ
Video Profile: High Quality

Avid DNxHD
Container: MXF (OP1a)
Video: DNxHD (VC-3)
Bitrate: 185 Mbps


All of these formats use 4:2:2 chroma subsampling internally; that's not a thing you set anywhere in the Ae interface. You could deliver either MPEG2 or Avid DNxHD via Adobe Media Encoder on either Mac or PC. You can only deliver Apple ProRes on a Mac, and you can either use AME or render directly from Ae.

Walter Soyka
Designer & Mad Scientist at Keen Live [link]
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
@keenlive [twitter]   |   RenderBreak [blog]   |   Profile [LinkedIn]


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Richard Garabedain
Re: How do you export a progressive mov to interlaced and have the colour channels set to 4:2:2 as opposed to RGB?
on Jul 2, 2018 at 10:23:03 pm

You need media encoder i think


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