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Huge objects in c4d

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ida yossef
Huge objects in c4d
on Mar 8, 2019 at 4:30:15 pm

Hey everyone,

I don't know how to make my objects look huge,no matter how big their scale is they always look normal.
is there a way to achieve that???

example(I want my object to look like this: 

I took this pick from a video called 

Anubisath gate

and thank you


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Jim Scott
Re: Huge objects in c4d
on Mar 8, 2019 at 6:57:29 pm

Use a wide angle lens. Here's a tutorial that should help:

https://greyscalegorilla.com/tutorials/choosing-the-correct-focal-length-in...


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Steve Bentley
Re: Huge objects in c4d
on Mar 9, 2019 at 5:49:49 am

Don't forget aerial density/diffusion - this is the effect that humidity and dust in the air imparts to any image (at least on earth or any other planet with an atmosphere and either wind or water). The bigger something is, the more air there is between you and the far reaches of that object and therefore the more aerial density/diffusion will occur.

This tends to make things more blue and lighter the farther they are from camera (water droplets scatter blue light more than they scatter the other colors - its why the sky is blue) so air with water drops in it will impart a blue hue to things the farther away they are. The saturation of colors is less too - this is partly to do with the scattering of the colors in the reflected light and because the more water (in this case vaporized water) the light has to pass through, the more you end up with just the purple end of the spectrum. Go look at pictures of fish under water - the ones in the distance have no red in them, very little yellow, if any, and only some green, but they all have blue.
But this effect is also because there is so much suspended dirt in the air and dirt tends to have a muddying effect on anything - the color of your new car looks less intense with a layer of grime on it. It mutes the color because if its own dull color but it also lightens the color because light reflects off it instead of passing through. You are probably seeing more light reflecting off dust when you look at a distant mountain than you are seeing light reflecting off the mountain. Whatever color that dust is, that's the color the distant things will lighten to. On earth its paynes gray, because we've got both mud and water, on mars it would be a light pinkish orange. (so the chances of there being little "green" men on mars is pretty low, and if there are they will look completely fake because the light they reflect will fight with the above.)

One of the classic things to help making things look big is what we call "signposts".
There are two kinds of these things but they are both extra objects that get thrown into the scene, objects we know the size of, and when seen in context with or near the big object we can get a sense of scale. It can be as simple as having some birds flying by at great distance but still in front of the big object. We all know how big birds are so our brain says, "if they are that small they must be x far away and if they are that far away and still in front of that thing then.... whoa!"
But what if you are shooting on planet X and they don't have birds, or their birds are the size of buses? Then use a repeating object - think: a line of fence posts. Show an object in the foreground, say next to a person, so we get a sense of how big this new object is compared to something we do know: the person. Then repeat that object back into the distance - it doesn't have to be in a line like a line of fenceposts (but that can help), it can just be scattered about. But make sure there are really small ones back in the distance that are both recognizable as the ones we can see in the foreground and in front of the giant object. The brain will make the size association and make the leap.
You can also use "signposts" to create repeating patterns that follow perspective lines leading the eye back. Every time that repeating object gets smaller or the implied lines of perspective get closer your eye knows its going deeper into the scene.

There is something called high frequency and low frequency detail. Things in the distance tend to have less detail because they are far away so we can't see every little eyelash on the massive head, because those eyelashes are smaller than our eye or the camera can resolve, but also because there is so much water and dust in the way (and air current distortion) it's actually making a blurry mess of things, so the details gets soft: the noisyness or the frequency of the detail is very low. Compare that to someone standing right next to you where you can see every hair on their head and every pore in their skin. The noisyness or frequency of those details is very high.

Finally, due to aerial diffusion, or some call it the "horizon effect" (the horizon always looks lighter than any other part of a scene because its the farthest away) things that are dark tend to come forward and things that are lighter tend to recede in the eye because we associate a lighter horizon with great distances. If you go and look at concept art for movies or video games you will almost always see a very dark foreground (a character emerging from a cave say, with us looking past him out into the brightly lit world beyond). This is a great way to impart distance. It also creates a comparison - your brain knows that the rock the giant head is made out of is the same color as the rock of the cave mouth we are looking out from, but when you lighten the rock of the head, your brain figures out how far that must be away to be a different color, and compares it to the same colored rock next to us.



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ida yossef
Re: Huge objects in c4d
on Mar 19, 2019 at 5:07:52 pm

Steve Bentley thank you so much for your explanation . I'm really new to this world ,I think it gonna take me a while to reach the level in that picture.


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Steve Bentley
Re: Huge objects in c4d
on Mar 19, 2019 at 6:57:32 pm

If you want more reference, check out Prometheus (Alien sequel) or Tom Cruise's "The Mummy".



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