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Stereoscopic Renders / doing post in After Effects on those renders

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Brian MurphyStereoscopic Renders / doing post in After Effects on those renders
by on Sep 15, 2014 at 7:35:51 pm

Hi all,

Two part question:

1) Has anyone rendered out true 3D animation in Cinema 4D that can be viewed with 3D glasses?

2) Has anyone taken rendered stereoscopic footage and applied post to it in After effects, maintaining the 3D with your post effects?

I was just looking for some guidance as to how I might complete a project this way.

Thank you!
Brian



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Michael GoldbergRe: Stereoscopic Renders / doing post in After Effects on those renders
by on Sep 16, 2014 at 1:10:25 pm

Hi Brian,
We've done it for a few projects, and it's worked pretty nicely.
We have an alienware 3D monitor (OptX™ AW2310 23" 3D Full HD Monitor)
and Nvidia 3D Vision -
http://www.nvidia.com/object/3d-vision-main.html

This allows us to view Stereoscopic In Active Shutter Mode. You'll need some type of setup to view your 3D work. This is an inexpensive solution that works well. Essentially all you're doing is creating 2 comps, a Left Eye Comp and a Right Eye Comp.
I start in C4D, which has a stereo cam. It's very easy to use, all you need to do is add it to you're scene, and it will render both eyes out for you. There are several settings on the camera (you can read about it here, (http://www.cafedownloads.com/reviews/r13/3dstereo.html)
but the key setting is zero parallax. This is a plane that you can visually set to what you want to be at screen depth. Once in After Effects, you need to set up a comp for each eye. We generally render out Full Left Eye and Right Eye comps, and send it out for final delivery. Some will ask for a combined HD image with the left eye on one side and the ride side on the other (some may want top/bottom). Easy enough to set up. I generally just make changes to each comp by copying whatever I need from the Left side. If you have lots of effects, you can simply delete the Right side, and just copy the left side to recreate the right side. If you find you're doing lots of tweaking there are scripts available to do that for you...






It's been a while since we were doing 3D work, but it's not quite as painful as it may first seem. There's lots of info. out there regarding things like eye separation and more. Good Luck.

Mike



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Brian MurphyRe: Stereoscopic Renders / doing post in After Effects on those renders
by on Sep 16, 2014 at 4:05:18 pm

Hey Michael,

Thanks a million for the input!

I'm going into this very new so I would really appreciate your feedback on some of the issues I'm about to face with this. Basically, I have an animation done for a client that the client now wants to see in real 3D using glasses - obviously, it will have to be re-rendered. It seems the best way to do this is with what you've described as "shutter" mode...? Is this the same thing as an interlaced (How C4D identified it) image, each field showing a different eye's point of view? Also, I've seen the words active and passive being used, not sure what that means and how I would base my decision on which to use.

Why would I need a special monitor to see this if my LCD monitor can display interlaced footage at the refresh rate that the glasses are set at (or can it)?

Thank you again!
Brian



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Michael GoldbergRe: Stereoscopic Renders / doing post in After Effects on those renders
by on Sep 18, 2014 at 1:08:34 pm

Hi Brian,
What I would do is first find out what the client wants as a delivery format. The stereo images can be rendered as Side by Side, Top/Bottom, or interlaced (all 3 of these give you a half res image, since you're reducing the frame to 1/2 of the full frame). It depends on their playback system. You can also deliver full Frame separate animations. That can all be done with no glasses, and no special tv etc. If however you're going to want to view the 3D, and see how it looks (which I assume you will), you'll need to view it. I've seen people use the old anaglyph method (red/blue glasses), but it's not very good. I chose the active shutter method (active shutter is just - the left and right eye turn on and off in sync with the monitor.) for viewing because I thought it would give me the best images, and was what was being used for home 3D TV's. There's lots of reading on the web on the difference between active and passive, I'm sure they'll give you much better explanations than I can.



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