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Question on training

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Jennifer Arani
Question on training
on Jul 15, 2011 at 4:25:55 pm

Hello,

I am stuck in a unusual situation. My company is considering buying 4d Cinema but the only 3d rendering class I can find in the local market is for 3d Max. The instructor has not returned my call and I need to decide quickly if I should enroll. So here is my question......

As a total novice to 3d rendering I do not have even the basics. Will learning the basics with 3d max give me at least enough know how to understand the workflow needed for Cinema 4d?

I don't want to make the same mistake I did with AE and motion graphics. I learned what I need for the project in front of me so my speed at it is not fast enough for the workload. I want to learn to walk before I run.

Thanks for your advise!

Jennifer Arani


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Question on training
on Jul 16, 2011 at 1:31:16 am

Hi Jennifer -

I'm a Max 2011 user, and I've been using Max for almost ten years. I used Truespace for a short while before Max, and I can say, from that experience, that your training for Max might help you in the broadest way toward C4D, but only in the same sense that you might get the gist of it.

You would see that most 3D software is based broadly on CAD software, so your basic view setup is four screens, maybe a top, left, right, and perspective view. And you'll find toolbars to the top, and often on the right or left, but the nomenclature, icons, keyboard shortcuts, tools, and such would be entirely different. I don't know this as a fact, but you might have parametric objects, and shapes, such as cubes, spheres, pyramids, text, splines, etc., in both products, but how you access them and modify them is probably totally different.

If you're good at self direction and discipline, and your company is set on C4D, then I would suggest having them pay for a month or so of Lynda.com training online. The training videos they offer are right on the money - I've used them for Max, Photoshop, Premiere Pro, Illustrator, and Flash. With about a weeks worth of training on the Flash topic, I was able to create a first website (it's no longer up now - I created my new one in WordPress) in a short space of time.

While I think that NLE training can be applied across products (FCP, PPro, and AVID), there's just too much difference in the feature sets of 3D software for it to be helpful other than just the basics. Good luck with it.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Jennifer Arani
Re: Question on training
on Jul 18, 2011 at 3:18:29 pm

Thanks for your response. I have used Lynda.com and it is great but as I am, and boy do I wish I was not, a verbal learner it does not always help me build the right foundation for some thing so new and foriegn.
Trust me you would hate taking a class with me cuz I ask ALOT of questions. For some sick reason I have to talk about it and question it to death before it really sinks in...but once it does...watch out I run you over :)

Based on your answer I am going to take the class because its the basics I really need to get locked in...I can do Lynda.com for the workflows. Thank you for your time and answer it really is appreciated.

Jen :)

Jennifer Arani


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Question on training
on Jul 18, 2011 at 3:33:01 pm

Jennifer -

Learning styles vary. Don't feel bad about - it's not a handicap, it's just the way your mind best absorbs complex information. I'm the type who sits down with a manual, or watches a tutorial, but I have to do it multiple times before I "get it". Then I have to repeat that periodically or it's gone.

Good luck with your class. Once you get the basic concepts, picking up whichever software you have to work with will be much easier, albeit a long, learning curve. Don't let the complexity get to you, though. Learn the features as you need them - interface, main features, animation, texturing, lighting, modeling (if you need modeling at all - you can purchase a model of just about anything you need).

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Jay Storr
Re: Question on training
on Aug 5, 2011 at 4:29:59 pm

Jennifer,

Caught this late. I use both of these programs extensively. While the modeling basics are the same, the programs are very different. The benefit you're going to have is that the UI in C4D is in my opinion, the best of any 3D modeling program. A lot of programs like Max tend to bury the functions, while C4D was built by people who have a strong understanding of GUI's, and as a result I think it's easier to pick up.

I have noticed however that Lynda.com is lacking in Tutorials for Cinema 4D. Their 3DS Max videos are pretty Robust, but last I checked (it's been awhile) their C4D videos were incredibly basic. You might want to check out Cineversity. It's a site run by maxon (makers of C4D) and it has a wide range of videos, from entry level (some of these are free), to very advanced techniques. They even have a moderator named Dr. Sassy who will address your specific issue if you post it. For instance I was having trouble getting a motor to animate correctly, so he posted a companion file and we went back and forth over the next day or so until I was able to get it functioning properly. It's another subscription, but if you don't have an easily accessible C4D resource, then I think it's a solid investment.


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