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Marketing head scratcher.... hmmm

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Todd Terry
Marketing head scratcher.... hmmm
on Jul 9, 2018 at 7:20:53 pm

Well this board has been painfully slow, and I was just doing a repair in the studio which brought to mind a question I've been wondering about for years and years... so I thought I'd bring this up...

Threadlockers come in two flavors, RED which is more or less permanent, and BLUE which is removable.

But the question is, why the heck is RED threadlocker sold in a BLUE tube, and the BLUE stuff in a RED tube????



And it is irrespective of brands...



So what kind of marketing genius is behind this?

Stop the madness!!!

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Shane Ross
Re: Marketing head scratcher.... hmmm
on Jul 12, 2018 at 6:57:57 pm

OMG! That's hilarious. A LOT of people must have bought the wrong versions...

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Bob Cole
Re: Marketing head scratcher.... hmmm
on Jul 19, 2018 at 1:37:49 am

Now you're messing with my head.

And just yesterday I finally figured out why Republicans are red.

Bob C


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Bob Zelin
Re: Marketing head scratcher.... hmmm
on Jul 19, 2018 at 9:47:04 pm

quick summary -
some idiot in front of the Chyron made the decision. And it stuck -
here is the longer story -


According to another source, in 1976, John Chancellor, the anchorman for NBC Nightly News, asked his network's engineers to construct a large illuminated map of the United States. The map was placed in the network's election-night news studio. If Jimmy Carter, the Democratic candidate that year, won a state, it would light up in red; if Gerald Ford, the incumbent Republican president, carried a state, it would light up in blue. The feature proved to be so popular that, four years later, all three major television networks would use colors to designate the states won by the presidential candidates on Election Night, though not all using the same color scheme. NBC continued to use the color scheme employed in 1976 for several years. NBC newsman David Brinkley famously referred to the 1980 election map outcome showing Republican Ronald Reagan's 44-state landslide as resembling a "suburban swimming pool".[15]

CBS, from the 1984 election on, used the opposite scheme: blue for Democrats, red for Republicans. ABC used yellow for Republicans and blue for Democrats in 1976. However, in 1980 and 1984, ABC used red for Republicans and blue for Democrats. In 1980, when independent John B. Anderson ran a relatively high-profile campaign as an independent candidate, at least one network provisionally indicated that they would use yellow if he were to win a state. Similarly, in 1992 and 1996, at least one network would have used yellow to indicate a state won by Ross Perot; neither of them did claim any states in any of these years.

By 1996, color schemes were relatively mixed, as CNN, CBS, ABC, and The New York Times referred to Democratic states with the color blue and Republican ones as red, while Time and The Washington Post used an opposite scheme.[16][17][18] NBC used the color blue for the incumbent party, which is why the Democrats were represented by Blue in 2000.

In the days following the 2000 election, whose outcome was unclear for some time after election day, major media outlets began conforming to the same color scheme because the electoral map was continually in view, and conformity made for easy and instant viewer comprehension. On Election Night that year, there was no coordinated effort to code Democratic states blue and Republican states red; the association gradually emerged. Partly as a result of this eventual and near-universal color-coding, the terms "red states" and "blue states" entered popular use in the weeks following the 2000 presidential election. After the results were final, journalists stuck with the color scheme, as The Atlantic's December 2001 cover story by David Brooks entitled, "One Nation, Slightly Divisible", illustrated.[19]

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
bobzelin@icloud.com


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Tim Wilson
Re: Marketing head scratcher.... hmmm
on Jul 19, 2018 at 10:14:47 pm

[Bob Zelin] "ll three major television networks would use colors to designate the states won by the presidential candidates on Election Night, though not all using the same color scheme. NBC continued to use the color scheme employed in 1976 for several years. NBC newsman David Brinkley famously referred to the 1980 election map outcome showing Republican Ronald Reagan's 44-state landslide as resembling a "suburban swimming pool"."

It's funny, I'd just been thinking the other day that I could SWEAR that this had at one time been the opposite of what it is today, but I'd forgotten for a good many years that it was also more or less arbitrary. Many

I assumed that some TD somewhere decided that "red" and "Republican" both start with the letter R, and told the Chyron operator to set it up accordingly. "Blue for incumbent" doesn't have quite the same ring to it, but it doesn't have to. Once you hear "Red for Republican", you can figure out the rest. I'm not at all shocked that this is how it was standardized. It's the only way that makes sense.

To me, anyway. Make it easy to remember. I really do live for these kinds of shortcuts. For example, my life would be almost impossible to live without having learned "lefty loosey, righty tighty", and would be COMPLETELY unmanageable if I hadn't been taught that you can remember which hand is your left because it forms an "L".



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