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Celebrity Endoursment

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John Newman
Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 2, 2016 at 1:23:01 pm

What do you think of Celebrity Endoursment? I've heard some people find this very useful way to promote your business, what do you think? I want to try Celebrity Connected but the question is money, will I regret?


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Mark Suszko
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 2, 2016 at 3:12:26 pm

I'm not convinced that using celebrities, particularly sports celebrities, really works for anything outside the celeb's narrow area of expertise. For example, I don't think an ex-football star's opinion will sway a purchase of a car, a new roof for the house, or a financial investment scheme. If she's a tennis star and is telling me the racquet to buy, then yes. Safer areas for celebs would be fashion products or maybe high end restaurants.

The product or service needs to make sense in the tie-in. Mickey Rooney for Frozen Yogurt - why? Because they wanted to market to an elderly audience?

I see some celebs touting various medications. I would say, if the celebs themselves use the medication or have the condition, it makes sense. Otherwise, just because "they played a doctor on TV", is not a good enough reason.

Car makers spend a lot of money to hire celebrity voice-overs, and I really couldn't tell you why that would matter; half the time, you don't recognize the voice anyhow. is that voice Jeremy Piven... or Moe Rocca? And why would I care? And in the Mercedes spots that use John Hamm, they're using as their spokesperson the actor most people remember as the creative but morally bankrupt advertising huckster from "Mad Men", who will sell you anything by playing to your psyche. To me, that's actually quite a joke on the audience.


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Todd Terry
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 2, 2016 at 3:27:30 pm
Last Edited By Todd Terry on Aug 2, 2016 at 3:29:57 pm

The old joke in the advertising world is that is you are completely out of ideas... write a jingle or hire a celebrity (along with "For extra impact, put type on a slant," and the rule that a billboard should be seven words or less).

I think celebrity endorsements are okay, but I can't stand the ones that seem so completely random. The late Fred Thomson did spots for a reverse mortgage company. That made some sense, he was not only an actor but a retired senator with some gravitas, and was also exactly in the age bracket as the target audience.

On the flip side, there's a series of PSAs about brain health and brainhealth.gov featuring actress Marcia Gay Harden... who keeps magically appearing in scenes to talk to people about their brains (usually accompanied by something like "Aren't you Marcia Gay Harden?" or "Wow it's Marcia Gay Harden!"). These I totally don't get at all. I mean, no disrecspect to her at all, but she's hardly an A-list actor and I don't think the average person would recognize her on the street, and she has no known connection to the subject. Maybe it's a personal cause to her, and if so, more power to her... but we certainly don't know that from the spots.

If a celebrity doesn't have a real tangible connection to the subject... you run the risk of this...







T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Todd Terry
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 2, 2016 at 3:34:11 pm
Last Edited By Todd Terry on Aug 2, 2016 at 3:35:17 pm

Also... I suspect the OP might be spam and just a plug for "Celebrity Connected" since this was a new-member signup just for this posting (not that they always are in this situation, but certainly often).

My observations, though, stand.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 2, 2016 at 4:17:14 pm

Do they sound like this?







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John Newman
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 3, 2016 at 9:38:39 am

Thanks for your responses guys, but I think we're misunderstanding each other. By 'Celebrity Endorsement' I consider few photos with my product at Gifting Suite or something like that. I mean I do not possess millions of dollars. I want to post photos or videos to social medias with hashtags and get some reputation and visibility for my brand. All I have is startup and I'm seeking something to start with. Heard it works in some cases, especially with the food which is my sphere. Fans who want to drink or eat the same food as their idol is a huge power. Isn't it?


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Todd Terry
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 3, 2016 at 2:29:27 pm

[John Newman] "Fans who want to drink or eat the same food as their idol is a huge power. Isn't it?"

Huge power? Just a personal opinion of course, but as for myself I'd put very little value on that.

Unless you just have money to burn I'd sure think marketing dollars would be much better spent elsewhere.

And... still thinking the OP is likely spam.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 3, 2016 at 4:37:07 pm

Vitamin Water is a celebrity brand, and I guess it's doing Okay... Though, if you study the nutrition data, Vitamin Water carries as many calories in a bottle as eating a hot dog. Maybe I can sell "Hot Dog Water", in a low-calorie version.

Foodies are an odd lot. You hear about great success with a few like Bourdain, Alton Brown, Emeril, that guy in the clown costumes with the frizzed hair and hot sauce... but I think it's a very hard area to get into at that level. Alton took years to do it, and he's my fave - started out as a TV producer, then went to cooking schools to learn cooking before he designed his own unique style.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 3, 2016 at 11:38:50 pm

[Todd Terry] "And... still thinking the OP is likely spam."

Not spam. :-)

Guys, there's literally not a single more proven method in advertising than celebrity endorsement. It's been going on from the very, very beginning of advertising, and sponsors keep doing it because it works.

The first use of it that I can remember is from the 1760s, when Wedgewood got the royals to endorse their China. I remember it like it was yesterday. LOL

I was wearing my Michael Jordans at the time. LOL Srsly, the fact that I don't need to tell you what that means is all you need to know about celebrity endorsements. They're the ugliest, least comfortable shoes of all time imo, but put that fella's name on it, and they turn into gold.

An early case of a celebrity actually being aware of endorsements as an actual thing was the esteemed minister Rev. Henry Ward Beecher.

Suffering from a case of hay fever, Rev. Beecher found a good cure in Dr. M M Townsend's Remedy for Hay Fever, Asthma and Catarrh. He sent Dr. Townsend two separate letters praising the medicine and also telling him that he was 'at liberty to make such use of this letter as may secure the relief of all hay fever patients. Dr. Townsend used the full text of both the letters in a package insert of the product box.


I know that most of you are way too cool to be persuaded by anything, and much MUCH too cool to be actual fans of anyone, but there are reasons why some of the classic celebrity endorsements are classics. These include embedded from the earliest days of print, the earliest days of radio, to say nothing of the implied endorsement of sponsored programming.

Trading cards? Celebrity endorsement. That one's an interesting field, where Topps stopped making the gum they were trying to sell, because it was getting the endorsements greasy!

WHEATIES? HEARD OF IT?

I bet you could come up with a million of these if you just thought about it -- Ronald Reagan for Chesterfield, Arthur Godfrey for Colgate, Dinah Shore for Chevrolet, Wilt Chamberlain for Volkswagen (I'll never forget him unfolding himself from a Beetle), Mean Joe Green for Coke (remember the kid in the tunnel? If you're my age and say you don't, I don't believe you), John Cameron Swayze for Timex ("Takes a licking and keeps on ticking!), Dolly Parton for Breeze, Loretta Lynn for Crisco, Brooke Shields and Mark Wahlberg for Calvin Klein (jeans and undies), Bob Uecker and a bevy of others for Miller Lite (a product that wouldn't exist without those early "Tastes great! Less filling!" spots), Bill Cosby for pudding (oops -- BUT YOU REMEMBER IT), Sting and a bevy of others for MTV (these "I want my MTV" spots weren't just promos -- MTV ran the ads on other stations to encourage people to get their cable systems to carry MTV at all)....

If one of you can't name a dozen of these off the top of your head, well, I won't call you a liar, but I'll think it in my head. LOL

The power of endorsement is ESPECIALLY true of social media, where platforms like Instagram are massively driven by celebrities endorsing their own power drinks or jewelry lines or whatever. There are celebrities whose social media is pretty much all endorsement all the time.

So John, I agree with you. A picture of a celebrity with your product on social media is a FANTASTIC idea. Go for it! I think it may be harder than you think, for this exact reason: celebrities are very aware of how much money there is in endorsements.

Hey, it's a living, right? Who are we at the COW to look down on anyone else's advertising strategy, right?

Have some fun with this tag at AdWeek: http://www.adweek.com/topic/celebrity-endorsements

And just Google a couple of articles on the subject. I promise you'll be beaming ear to ear as you read some of these and relive some of your happiest childhood memories.

As for as tenuous connections go, I think the more random the better. John Lydon (aka Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols) for Country Life Butter was a gas. He insisted they let him mostly write the spots, and he used the money to fund an album and tour when he was between labels. And as he said, "You can tell by looking at me that I eat a lot of butter."



I'm going to skip Bob Dylan's short for Victoria's Secret, even though it was awesome, because I think his conversation with Watson is even more random. As random as Bob himself.



Okay, the butter one is better. Thanks, Farmer's Wife!



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Andrew Kimery
Re: Celebrity Endoursment
on Aug 14, 2016 at 3:53:39 am

[Tim Wilson] "Guys, there's literally not a single more proven method in advertising than celebrity endorsement. It's been going on from the very, very beginning of advertising, and sponsors keep doing it because it works."

Gotta agree. If it didn't work it wouldn't be so ubiquitous. Sports is a prime example. Athletes, venues, cars, etc., are branded out the wazoo. Many athletes make more from sponsorship deals than from the sport they compete in. Am I going to buy a Buick or sign up for Nationwide insurance because I think Manning really knows a lot about cars and insurance? Nope. But I remember the Buick and Nationwide commercials because Manning was in them which helps with brand awareness which is one of the goals of advertising.

Execution is also important. Just having a celeb say "I like brand X' isn't very memorable and will probably go over like a lead balloon. But having something like the Johnny Rotten spots Tim posted is a different beast. Put in a no-name actor and the same ad is pretty forgettable, but Johnny gives the ad an instant hook (assuming the viewer knows who he is).

Another example is Apple's Think Different campaign. The most memorable part is the posters of famous people with the Apple logo next to them (and Jeff Goldblum).


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