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Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student

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jimmy chen
Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 24, 2015 at 10:23:55 pm

Hi all, sorry in advice if this is not the most appropriate place to post this question. I've already checked many posts but didn't really find my answer.

I'm a recent graduate student getting started into the industry and I'm struggling with the hourly rate and day rate, or any possible way for me to charge people.

I have some of my own gear like a 5D II, Rode shotgun mic, portable sound recording device (H4N), some solid tripod, and lens.

I've been working on some of the 3-5 minuets commercial videos

I'm in charge to set up, record footage on set, and everything else in post.

I uses final pro X, adobe premiere, Avid,

moreover, If I'm shooting a product advertisement, how should I charge for? that means to do everything including gears, creating concept, and post-production.

Or maybe the better question is how do I know how much I should get pay for in my level? is there any website that gives more suggestion or even some kind of statistics?


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Ned Miller
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 25, 2015 at 12:45:41 pm

I disagree. That topic has been discussed ad nauseam on this forum. It is so sad that the mere act of buying $3000 of equipment allows a newbie to compete against us.

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
www,bizvideo.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 25, 2015 at 4:59:14 pm
Last Edited By Mark Suszko on Aug 25, 2015 at 6:27:14 pm

Ned needs a hug, everybody.




Jimmy, how to calculate day and hourly rates is something we discuss so often in this forum, even your most casual keyword search would have turned up enough to fill up your summer reading list.




While you search it out, though, I would like to explain that "making commercials", at least for broadcast, is a little more complicated than just having gear and some sense of how to use it. If indeed you are seeking to do broadcast TV spots, there is the issue of buying the actual AIRTIME: something you as an individual are not set up to do. A cable TV station or an advertising agency CAN book airtime, usually thru brokers or agents. Where you are on the food chain now, in terms of making broadcast TV spots, is that you will have to go work for one of these cable companies or ad agencies, who will then bill the client for your time and gear, as well as their "handling fees". If you go to the local pet shop and talk the owner into making a commercial, you yourself and the shop owner have no way to put that commercial on TV except thru those two providers, so, if you're the shop owner, why should they hire you, when they still need to hire the cable company, which BTW offers the "production" of the commercial "FREE" with the buy of the air time.

Okay, say you instead mean to just make commercials for the web. Seems easy; just put it on YouTube, it doesn't even cost anything, right?

No.

That gets you into the fun land of SEO and how to get the spot shown on multiple web sites, again, usually thru some agent or broker who works with Yahoo, Google, etc. to place the ads. Do you have any experience in that area?

You are better off at your stage of development to be working for one of these "bigger fish", than trying to do it all yourself.


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Andrew Kimery
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 26, 2015 at 1:13:20 am

Here's an info graphic about how to calculate your rate.

http://blog.creativelive.com/how-to-calculate-freelance-hourly-rate-infogra...

Here's a blog post about how to calculate your rate.

http://daredreamermag.com/2011/05/26/how-to-go-about-setting-your-rates/

Here's another one.

http://www.larryjordan.biz/calculating-the-rate-to-charge-for-your-time-and...


And don't forget to hug Ned.


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jimmy chen
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 27, 2015 at 9:15:41 am

Awesome and fruitful info Sir!! thank you so much for the links :D


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Nick Griffin
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 26, 2015 at 5:13:40 pm

Then there is the whole matter of meeting the TV stations' "standards" for format, delivery, broadcast safe levels of color and luma. Sorry to say Jimmy that it appears you've yet to learn what you don't know. Your path to success will be made much smoother by first working with/for someone with practical experience in production. Just having gear and software is no where near enough.

And I wholly agree that Ned needs a hug... or a chill pill.


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Mark Suszko
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 26, 2015 at 6:59:50 pm

I would hire Ned if I was in a position to need his services, but I'm not. Maybe some day, though. The chiding is all in fun to a worthy debating partner.


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jimmy chen
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 27, 2015 at 9:27:17 am

Thank you for your advice Sir!

The only reason for me to have those equipment is for me to gain more experience and opportunities to learn :D
surely I never thought by just owning some camera's would make me a professional, but at least it buys me more chances to work with more great people :D

Right now I am just throwing my resumes to places and hopping to get into any one of them so I can learn more from different people!

Thank you very very much for your advice (Thumbs up)


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jimmy chen
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 27, 2015 at 9:14:30 am

Hi Mark,

Thank you so much for your comments and advice!!
I was just too afraid if I "charge too much" or "charge too less" because many posts that I read before posting my own question, many of those posts were answered way back in 2012 or even 2006. and I understand that the environment changes really fast, so I thought it might be best to ask questions here rather than being wrong on action.

Moreover, advice with the "big fish" is great! newbie like me really need experience from professionals, it is hard to just self learning everything. you really pointed me a bright light :) thank you so much Sir!!


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Nathan Walters
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 26, 2015 at 8:35:26 pm

Definitely can't be afraid to charge too much. I've found that I'd much rather work with 2 well paying clients than 10 low paying clients. The low playing clients also tend to be the ones who want a ton for nothing and have ridiculous expectations. Be willing to hold out for the better clients.

Nathan Walters
Halo Union Productions
http://www.HaloUnion.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: Another "How much should I charge for" question from recent graduate student
on Aug 27, 2015 at 4:31:14 pm

I would re-post a link if I could find it, but I had read an article a while back by some guy who started out as a handyman: he wanted to work less hard for more money, so he raised his rates, again and again, and instead of losing customers, he gained MORE handyman work but also the new work was all of a higher-end scale altogether; becoming more like high-end contracting and custom carpentry than fixing drywall dents and installing sink faucets or hanging a new door. As he raised rates again and again, he chased away the bottom level of customers, trading up for higher-margin customers, and finally got to a point where his weekly work hours were short enough to have time to enjoy life, and the income generated at that ultimate higher rate, actually made it affordable to do so.

It's always going to be a bit of a gamble, doing this, and it infers that you do a lot of marketing legwork as well as understanding the market, the customers, and the networking. But the way to get more is to ask for it. Certainly, you won't get more if you DON'T ask.


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