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Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?

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Mark SuszkoNomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 5:05:44 pm

We were having a discussion about an upcoming project where I'd upload a daily short edited video to youtube, and we discussed whether it was correct semantically to refer to it for marketing purposes as "see our podcast on youtube". One faction says podcasting properly should refer to audio-only streams. I say today they are just as likely or more so, to be videos or VLOGS as audio-only, that "podcast" has become generalized like "xerox" or "kleenex". Is it confusing or helpful to audiences to call the youtube daily feed a podcast? What about if I also upload the identical programming to itunes?


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Matt TownleyRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 5:29:08 pm

One of the largest "podcast" networks that I'm aware of is Leo Leporte's TWIT. They refer to their shows, which include video and audio, as netcasts. Like you said, probably not a question with a right or wrong, but just preference and whatever you think will register the best with your audience.


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Tim WilsonRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 6:58:56 pm

In general, podcasts are things that are syndicated through platforms like iTunes. The "pod" comes from iPod, where you'd plug in your iPod to your computer, and it would automatically download the latest episodes of the podcasts you've subscribed to.

The content of podcasts can be not only video and audio, but also PDFs and eBooks. The primary characteristic is syndication to a device.

My guess is that podcasts, like everything else in iTunes that isn't an app, are dramatically declining.

I don't know about you, but I barely even use my phone browser anymore, except for access to features not included in the apps I use. I don't remember the last time I saw someone using a phone to look at Facebook/Words with Friends, or email. For me, it's tumblr, but as much as I used to enjoy podcasts, and as much impact as the COW got from podcasts we produced, I just can't imagine caring anymore.

And if I'm going to listen to anything for any length of time, it's music. (I'm a Spotify addict.)

What about any of you? Do you listen/watch podcasts anymore?

Even Netflix, HBO Go and what have you. I don't do any of that on my phone anymore. It's fun, and I still have the apps loaded, but pretty much everything else interests me more.

I think YouTube is a great platform. I definitely watch YouTube on my phone, and I love that on my Samsung Galaxy Note 3, I can run YouTube in the background while I do other stuff, but my YouTubing is almost entirely driven by links from social media. So you're definitely on the right track with that, Mark.

But for all the reasons above, I'd avoid the word podcast myself. It sounds like you're shooting for a very old target. "Webisode" is an okay word, but I think that the good old "episode" works great. Presumably the series of YouTube clips has a name, so it'd be "check out the latest episode of 'Mark Says Go,' with your host Mark Suszko." Or whatever.

Am I nuts? Are folks here still syndicating content for iPods/phones via iTunes? Either sending or receiving?


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Mark SuszkoRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 8:05:42 pm

If I'm doing a limited series covering a 10-day event, with five-minute edited reports, would you call it a podcast from "x" event? What about a wee-long trade show like an NAB? I think Larry Jordan calls all his non-webinar shows podcasts.


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Tim WilsonRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 8:24:11 pm

Larry distributes all his stuff through iTunes as his primary platform.. Things like the web are there because nobody should have all their eggs in one platform....

...but he's among a small handful of high profile TRUE podcasters still out there.

I misspoke a little bit in my last post, though. I didn't mean to say that people are no longer creating episodic online content. Of course they are. Tens of thousands of them. But unless you're pushing out syndicated content, it's not TECHNICALLY a podcast...but if that word makes you happy, go for it. People know generally enough what it means, now that I think about it, it has probably replaced the word webisode in a lot of people's minds.

But you asked, what's a podcast, and that's the answer. Syndicated content (audio, video, PDF, eBook, etc) meant to be viewed on devices, managed automatically.

Just explain to your viewers that they won't find it at the iTunes store, but will have to either download it manually into iTunes to load onto their phone, typically over a physical connection to their computer, or they'll have to view it through another app (YouTube) or a browser.


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Mark SuszkoRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 8:29:09 pm

Well, if I make you tube videos and some fool "subscribes" to them, would that meet your definition?


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Bill DewaldRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 8:59:53 pm

The way I see it, a podcast is a digitally distributed, time-shifted audio program. People usually use it to get their fix of NPR, or listen to Bill Simmons or Marc Maron.

It's a pretty established thing. I don't feel like they're declining dramatically, but they're just another option against Spotify or Itunes radio or whatever.

Apple tried to get the video podcast thing to fly back when the 5th gen Ipod came out in 2004, but it never really took off.


Webisode is a pretty dated term for a web distributed video series. Here's how all the things you could call a web project shake out:

http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=webisode%2C%20digital%20short%2C%20d...

With "digital short" pretty much being owned by SNL. The preferred portmanteau for video blog is "vlog".


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Rich RubaschRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 10:12:00 pm

Why not a mini-webcast or a mini web series. Like the mini-series on TV? You can pretty make up whatever name you want, which it sounds like TWIT did with their netcast term. Or a five part web series.

All work for me.

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production, Post, Studio Sound Stage
Founder/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Rich RubaschRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 10:14:13 pm

Just found this if you are into processed meats....it's called a series webcast.

http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/process-meets-technology-series-webca...

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production, Post, Studio Sound Stage
Founder/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Rich RubaschRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 2, 2014 at 10:15:12 pm

That's hilarious....late on a Monday I deciphered it as a web series on processed meats, but it is actually process meets tech.

Ha, had my own little laugh here!

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production, Post, Studio Sound Stage
Founder/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Jeff BreuerRe: Nomenclature and semantics: "podcast" : considered audio, video, both?
by on Jun 4, 2014 at 2:58:38 pm

I have heard webcast and for video specific, vodcast. One thing that always gets me worked up is the legal fights going on over the term "podcast." In '09 a company called Personal Audio filed for a trademark on the name and has actually taken out lawsuits with big "podcast" shows like The Adam Corolla Show. For a little light reading you can check this out:

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/02/podcasting-community-faces-patent-tro...

Though for a small show, I would imagine you would be safe.

I would also contend that syndicated webcast content is booming. I am a part of a small podcasting network and we distribute to probably five different outlets like Stitcher and Spreaker along with iTunes. There is a lot of really fantastic stuff out there too. We have been getting involved with a resurgence in the radio drama. If you haven't checked out the We're Alive show, I highly recommend it. It is a syndicated episodic radio drama about zombies. Very well done.


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