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How to present video to your clients

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Willem Scholtes
How to present video to your clients
on Feb 17, 2014 at 2:30:31 pm

Hi there fellow film makers,

I was wondering how all of you present you're videos tough out a project. Usually after the shoot i wont see the client so all communication goes over the phone and email. So the presentation for all the versions (Oflline, online etc) also go trough the power of the internet. So for us we use a Vimeo account. We upload the project there and put it behind a password. We sent the link together with the password and they can look at it and comment. When the we get the word that everything is perfect, then we make a 1080p and 720p MP4 and sent that by WeTransfer. Of course if the client demands something else we would do that. I must say that we mostly work for internet video, of course for broadcast it's a whole different story.

But i was wondering how you guys handle your daily video communication process?


p.s. English is not my native language, so excuse me if it ain't perfect.


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Todd Terry
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 17, 2014 at 5:39:06 pm

Hi Willem...

Our situation here is likely a little different than most, likely... but I'll pass on what we do...

The vast majority of our work is broadcast commercials. On top of that, most of our clients are here in our city, or at least in our market. Lastly, because we are mostly doing :30 projects and not a lot of long-form stuff, there is rarely tons of back-and-forth going on. Probably 75% of the time the a client sees the first cut and signs off on it as good-to-go. Other times there might be a small change or tweak or two, but that's usually about it.

So, all that being said...

We always greatly prefer (and encourage) clients to come here to our place to view their projects for the first time. Of course we want them to look as good as possible, and frankly they are never going to look any better anywhere else other than in our own building watching an absolutely pure master on a 50" screen in a controlled environment in one of our edit suites or in the conference room.

We've found that most (actually almost all) clients are more than happy to come here. I guess they consider it an "outing," and find it a little glamorous to go to a production facility (which it of course, is not, by any stretch).

Barring that, usually for long-term clients who know how to interpret what they are seeing (these are usually ad agencies), we'll often email little low-res files... usually .wmv files but we'll make whatever they can most easily view. We'll often do this for follow-up viewings or to approve changes.

If someone needs something higher-res than an emailable file, we'll make that and put it on our internal server here and then email them a download link.

On some occasions we'll put things on a private YouTube channel.

There are definite upsides and downsides to YouTube. On the downside, I just think it looks so tacky and "consumerish" to put a production company's professional videos on YouTube as a presentation outlet. You can't control the poster frames. And you have no control over the other garbage that pops up when your video is finished. On the upside though, videos on YouTube do look GREAT, and play pretty much flawlessly.

We've considered using Vimeo, but haven't yet. Firstly, we have not coughed up the dough to pay for a commercial Vimeo account, which you are supposed to do if you are a commercial for-profit business. Secondly, I know other people who disagree but I've never found Vimeo to work nearly as well as YouTube. Videos seem to require two or three clicks to get started, there is much MUCH more buffering than on YouTube, and I find videos often clog up and the only way to continue them is to refresh the whole page. This has been my Vimeo experience on numerous different computers, browsers, and ISPs.

There doesn't seem to be ONE good solution for it all, so we often use different avenues.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Jason Jenkins
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 17, 2014 at 8:20:27 pm

[Todd Terry] "There are definite upsides and downsides to YouTube. On the downside, I just think it looks so tacky and "consumerish" to put a production company's professional videos on YouTube as a presentation outlet. You can't control the poster frames."

Todd: Youtube now allows upload of a custom thumbnail.

[Todd Terry] "And you have no control over the other garbage that pops up when your video is finished."

When embedding, you have the option of not showing "related videos".

[Todd Terry] "I've never found Vimeo to work nearly as well as YouTube. Videos seem to require two or three clicks to get started, there is much MUCH more buffering than on YouTube, and I find videos often clog up and the only way to continue them is to refresh the whole page. This has been my Vimeo experience on numerous different computers, browsers, and ISPs."

I experienced a lot of the same things, but it seems that Vimeo has improved quite a bit over the last couple of years.

Also, I have used this cool place called Creativecow.net to host private videos.

Jason Jenkins
Flowmotion Media
Video production... with style!

Check out my Mormon.org profile.


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Bill Davis
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 25, 2014 at 11:34:43 pm

Just noting that my Vimeo experience has been very different from Todds. (Maybe it's something about the state of the internet pipes in our various systems?) but I've almost never had any issues with our client Vimeo distributions. So it's my "go to" platform when any file gets too big to use the direct SHARE-EMAIL-CLIENT path directly out of the FCP-X interface.

The fact share to Vimeo inside X is a single click process (as is share to YouTube) so convenience is probably a factor as well.

I do happily maintain a Vimeo Pro account, and see that $200 a year as far less than I used to pay for FedEx deliveries. And it's SO much easier and more efficient.

Also, with Vimeo Pro you can strip out ALL the branding elements and put in your own if you're an HTML jockey (I'm not and typically make my client Portfolios clean and simple) Vimeo Pro also lets you enable or disable client downloads and it's internal "versioning" for full size and mobile versions works pretty flawlessly and means my deliveries are automatically platform and device agnostic.

Many ways to get to the same place, but I hardly ever use YouTube because Vimeo is all I seem to need.

I'd feel differently if I was using the service to feed public viewing since YouTube dominates in Search - . but for internal client communications, I think Vimeo Pro is a pretty great platform.

FWIW, and YMMV.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Shane Ross
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 17, 2014 at 5:39:46 pm

Same as you...even for broadcast stuff. Provide links for the client to review the cut. Or ship DVDs if they are really in the dark ages. I have one client that demands we ship HDCAM SR tapes of the locked cut, fully mixed and color corrected...and THEN they give notes. That's an expensive process, but they pay for it...so...whatever.

But mainly I compress low res QT files, put them on Drop Box with window burn time code...they give notes. Then I will post a high res of the locked. They might come to look at the grade in person, or might be fine with the high res QT.

I cut a broadcast series for a company located in Virginia. It was all QT files uploaded to their FTP, and then shipped the drive back (a CLONE of the drive), when we had picture lock.

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Nick Griffin
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 17, 2014 at 7:56:02 pm

Willem-

MediaBatch Pro at MediBatch.com. I'm not sure if it's a currently supported product, but it is still offered for sale and was created by one of the earliest contributors to the COW for use with his clients.

After installing on your own leased server space, MediaBatch allows you to put up videos in Flash as well as other formats. Clients view them, leave markers at any spot with notes pertaining to those markers, leave more detailed notes in another section and check a "Pass" button when the video is approved. It also allows for the downloading of your video files and uploading of their scripts, graphics, etc. (or optionally you can disable either of both of these functions).

The "hits" counter is one of my favorite features as you can use it to capture the IP addresses of who views your videos. You can also turn off its visibility so you can tell who actually watches each item without letting them know that you know. More than once I've have had someone tell me they watched something when this function clearly lets me see that they have not.

As I said, I do not know the status of this product these days, but for the 3+ years we've been using it our clients have found it quite useful. The only thing is the client has to have Flash installed and, believe it or not, as recently as a couple of months ago we had one who did not and had to be talked through the process of going to Adobe.com, downloading and installing the Flash plug-in.


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Ron Hershey
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 18, 2014 at 2:26:33 pm

Our company provides content distribution services, including CD/DVD/BD duplication/replication and an electronic delivery service called e-Delivery. A couple of our video production house customers started using e-Delivery for "proofing" needs for some of the following reasons:

- e-Delivery protects the files against unauthorized use and distribution (a couple of our customers wanted to be sure their clients couldn't go and get their own duplication done and to prevent "in process" files floating around)

- e-Delivery supports not only video, but also audio, Flash, HTML, PDF, Ebook, etc., so they could use it for the other projects they did for customers like radio commercials, web videos/presentations, web ads, etc.

- e-Delivery uses a viewer/player, so the content they distributed to a customer is all contained in one place

- Depending on the level of e-Delivery selected, they could control when the content was available (i.e., specific dates), how many times it can be downloaded, how many devices it may be downloaded to, even allowing the customer to burn their own copy-protected DVD on a PC

- The content gets downloaded to the customer's device and plays from there (streaming while downloading for the first play), so they avoid some of the issues with pure streaming services (buffering, pixilation, stuttering, lack of availability if internet connection not available, etc.)

- The Basic level of service is free, just pay for the download

So this may not make sense for everyone, but for some of my customers it has and some of them use it while still using other forms of distributing proofing files. So take it for what it is worth and if it sounds like it makes sense for you, I'd be happy to discuss further.

Ron Hershey
Endeavor Digital, Inc.
Digital Content Management Solutions
717-685-4030
ronh@endeavordigital.com


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Shane Ross
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 18, 2014 at 3:09:43 pm

I once got a note from a network that is somewhat connected with "history:"

"hmmm...the history section here drags a bit. Can we cut it and add another build montage?"

Shane
Little Frog Post
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Jeff Breuer
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 18, 2014 at 6:25:51 pm

Willem, I use the same method you do for a lot of clients. I agree that Vimeo has become much better, but they still are not there yet. I have particularly noted that longer videos (say, over ten minutes) start to have the drag issues or latency or flat out clog issue. But for the price with the password protection, space, design and so on it is hard to beat.

Ron, your company sounds pretty interesting, I will have to check it out.

Jeff


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walter biscardi
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 18, 2014 at 7:29:35 pm

We use Screenlight for both client review and delivery. Clients can review the materials and make comments right on the same site.

When the project is done, we upload the full resolution file to the same site and they can download it from there.

Super simple and Screenlight works on all mobile devices make the review process even easier for our clients. In addition, we can assign the same client to multiple projects so they only need to know one username / password combination for the main site and then we just add them to whatever projects they need to review.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

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Walter Blazewicz
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 21, 2014 at 2:58:25 am

I use a combination of WeTransfer, Dropbox, and an upgraded Vimeo account. I've been doing a lot of educational work where multiple 5-minute videos are presented at once. Vimeo is useful for this as the client can click on a single link w/ password and see their videos arranged with appropriate headframes. I've noticed that many non-techie clients prefer Vimeo to a WeTransfer - I guess the embedded player is a more familiar interface.

For broadcast cable clients it's a low rez QT with burnin uploaded to company FTP or client's FTP.

Walter Blazewicz
Video Editor
Boston, MA
http://www.blazetracksmedia.com


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Willem Scholtes
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 21, 2014 at 2:02:49 pm

Wow great response guys!
I really like the greenlight application. Looks like a good looking and easy to use interface. Because we work a lot of times with clients who have no experience with video, or just aint that technical.
That is the reason we use Vimeo, because everybody understands Vimeo.

Walter the way you describe you're workflow is that you can send 1 link, and behind that link there are several videos? Because a lot of times i have to deliver several videos at once and in sent a link for every clip. Do you have the solution for this?


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Paddy Uglow
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 21, 2014 at 3:53:29 pm

You can make a Vimeo Album and send a link to that. If I remember, you have quite a bit of control over how the embedded album can look, if you're embedding it on a web page.

Re Vimeo v YouTube, I always think Vimeo has more of a kind of "film-maker" reputation rather than the "anything goes" of YouTube. But I find YouTube's interface lots easier to work with; it took me a while to work out that you have to save each Vimeo tab separately when entering film details etc - YouTube auto-saves all your updates as you do them. And you can upload more videos at once on youtube.

Paddy, CreativeMedia.org.uk


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Willem Scholtes
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 24, 2014 at 9:10:56 am

Wow, great tip!

And i agree with your Vimeo vs Youtube argument. Youtube does has more options, is more stable and uploading is way faster. But Youtube has a non professional vibe to it opposed to Vimeo.


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Walter Blazewicz
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 25, 2014 at 1:35:23 am

Paddy's response got it. Make an Album and you can have one link and one password.


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Bill Davis
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Feb 25, 2014 at 11:48:16 pm

In the Vimeo Pro ecosystem, these are Portfolios.

Portfolios let you group and present collections of videos from your library on a single page. You can apply different portfolio looks from their templates, or you can do custom HTML surrounds. You can also choose to display or hide branding elements at will.

The important thing is that you can create as many Portfolios as you like. You can put a password firewall in front of a Portfolio or leave it publicly accessible.

Vimeo Pro work is by default "Private" which is to say that unlike the public Vimeo portal, nothing gets indexed by the web crawlers or auto-bots - so even your non-password protected stuff isn't going to end up being searchable by the public unless you decide to make it public.

Also, Vimeo Pro has been flirting with "pay via click" and donation system type stuff for a while now - dipping their toes into the monetization puddle.. I don't know where they're going with that, but at some point, it's conceivable that they could add "pay to watch" functions - which might be interesting in the long run.

Right now I just see it as a great client service system.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Mike Cohen
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Mar 4, 2014 at 11:15:43 am

We use one of the transfer file services, for client ease of use. Most people know to download the file, though most of the services let you view in the browser as well. I see the download count and some files are downloaded once, others 20-30 times by the same person.

In the corporate/hospital world, youtube type sites are sometimes blocked so a file sharing service is the best bet. We also have our own web server where we can setup custom pages with some boilerplate html code for showing videos via native h.264 playback or flash for older browsers.

We also use Basecamp with some clients.

Mike Cohen


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Todd Terry
Re: How to present video to your clients
on Mar 4, 2014 at 4:09:21 pm

[Mike Cohen] "In the corporate/hospital world, youtube type sites are sometimes blocked"

Mike's right... that hadn't occurred to me. We don't really use YouTube for clients but two of our biggest are a gigantic hospital group, and a large credit union. I now remember both of them saying that they couldn't view YouTube videos because of internal settings there.

Also like Mike, in the distant past we also put files on our internal server here, and I wrote a custom html page to display the videos (at that time I did them with flv files). I honestly don't know why we stopped doing that... I might revisit that idea.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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