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Video Production in College

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Mike Kozlenko
Video Production in College
on Jul 22, 2013 at 10:30:12 pm

Hey Guys,

I am starting college in August and am currently majoring in Media Production. However, for the first 2 years, I will obviously be taking general education courses, before I get into my major. I have contacted the main production facility on campus and I will be volunteering for them, mainly doing live production, like sporting events. But I am not sure how often they will need me or exactly what I'll be doing.

My question is this: What should I be doing over the next 2 years to enhance my skills so I can go into my major and eventually the industry with an advantage over others?
My general goal is to just have a career in production: writing, directing,shooting, producing, and editing pretty much anything. Not sure if I want to go into narrative media or documentary/public affairs media

I did quite a bit of production in high school, from schools news, to sports shows, documentaries, marketing videos, and various other productions for local clients. So I do have some experience with writing, shooting, & editing. I learned how to use FCP 7 very well, as well as Apple Color, and Soundtrack Pro. I also know basic After Effects, but not really advanced techniques. I've also been learning Media Composer through the tutorials here on Creative Cow.

What is the best thing for me to do to improve my skills before I actually start the media production major in 2 years? Keep watching tons of tutorials on Media Composer and AE? Reading books on cinematography and lighting, like I've been doing?
Anything else?

I'd greatly appreciate any feedback.


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 22, 2013 at 10:38:57 pm

It sounds as if you're doing the right thing. Get experience in every aspect of production and post-production that you can. Apply for internships at television stations in your area - there are often ones which tie in to colleges with strong Media Production departments.

Read everything you can find, and watch tutorials. If you want to write, read like there's no tomorrow. I would suggest you learn Media Composer as well as Premiere Pro. There's no telling how the production world is going to shake out in the future, so optimize your options.

Find productions that you like, and pick them apart, figuring out which effects were used, and how they were lit, shot, and posted. Get as much hands-on experience as you can, and don't let anyone convince you that you can't make a future out of media production.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Bill Dewald
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 22, 2013 at 11:57:21 pm

I was in the same situation as you - I took about four semesters worth of general classes before I got to really sink my teeth into the film program at school.

I took a lot of art and humanities classes, and a bunch of them ended up being film related. I took an "American Studies" class on Disney, another on horror films, a class on New German Cinema, all outside the film department. I took "Rock and Related" in the music dept., as well as a few recording classes. I also took classes on business law, government administration, journalism, theater, and I took golf as my gym class.

If you have a choice, defiantly choose a gym class that would otherwise cost money. Don't take, like, jogging. You can jog for free. Take swimming, at least. Or bowling.

The other thing you need to do in the next two years is narrow down a career goal from "produce/write/shoot/direct any type of video." There is no way to chart a path for that type of career. You need to imagine an outcome that you'd like, and then figure out a series of steps to reach that goal. Otherwise you're just spinning your wheels.

It's good to dabble in all the software you can. Don't worry too much about mastering it - it will all be different once you graduate, and if you're not using it all the time, you'll just forget it anyway.


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walter biscardi
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 12:42:39 am

[Mike Kozlenko] "I am starting college in August and am currently majoring in Media Production. However, for the first 2 years, I will obviously be taking general education courses, before I get into my major. I have contacted the main production facility on campus and I will be volunteering for them, mainly doing live production, like sporting events. But I am not sure how often they will need me or exactly what I'll be doing. "

I have to say this is why I recommend Community or Junior college when folks ask me where to go to school for this industry. I spent two years at Community College actually doing production in the studios before I went to Syracuse and I was so far ahead of my classmates that I was teaching them stuff both in production and post. In fact I had a demo reel when I got to Syracuse, none of my classmates had even produced anything yet.


[Mike Kozlenko] "My question is this: What should I be doing over the next 2 years to enhance my skills so I can go into my major and eventually the industry with an advantage over others?"

Intern and volunteer as much as you can. Is there a film club / television club / etc... on campus? Get involved. Is there a local station / production company near the campus? Get an internship, even if it's not an "official school internship." Is there a user group like the Atlanta Cutters down here? Get your name and face out there so folks know who you are.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

Foul Water Fiery Serpent, an original documentary featuring Sigourney Weave...
MTWD Entertainment - Developing original content for all media.
"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.
"Science Nation" - Three years and counting of Science for the People.

Blog Twitter Facebook


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Kylee Peña
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 3:33:31 am

I agree with everything in this thread. Internships and loads of self-teaching in all your free time will pay off. Even if you can find a good group of filmmakers and make stuff with them.

The thing that I don't think has been mentioned that I wish someone had told me: don't get so wrapped up in getting to those two years of media production that you miss out on the first two years that set you up. Don't push aside your various prereqs or scoff at seemingly unrelated electives. Take stuff that truly interests you, even if it takes more time. These are the things that will really set you apart. In my opinion, most of what you learn that will be useful in the real world happens in internships, on the job, or through self-learning. Not saying your two years of media production won't teach you a bunch of stuff, it probably will. But being well balanced is important, and I wish I had taken a little more time to find classes that were interesting to me rather than rushing through to the end.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com


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Andy jackson
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 8:15:53 am

I could not really be bothered to read through all this thread after reading the first post.

Colleges filming local clients.... Probably for free.

This is the reason there is now no work or money in the business.

The rest of the other advice is all tosh!!!!!


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Mads Nybo Jørgensen
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 11:55:39 am

Andy, Andy, Andy - do not take your anger out on a young student with great hopes. It is not his fault that the industry has changed.

Mike, as several people has said, keep doing what you are doing and loads of it. If you are for the technical side of the industry, only hours and experience can put you ahead of the pack. If you are dreaming about directing, producing or journalism, I would go for political science, history or English university courses, rather than the media centric ones.

Andy, you need to step up to a professional level where the clients can't get your expertise anywhere else, and the students will beg to follow in your footsteps.

My 10p

All the Best
Mads

@madsvid, London, UK
Check out my other hangouts:
Twitter: @madsvid
http://mads-thinkingoutloud.blogspot.co.uk


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Steve Kownacki
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 12:11:27 pm

Love your attitude Mike!

Aside from all the tech stuff, learn how to communicate, how to truly listen & understand situations. Be the rational guy on set. Being able to communicate with all levels of people will get you places. It's "who knows you", not "who you know" become the guy people want to know.

Take a biz management course or 2, understand the biz from a bean counters point of view.

Steve





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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 2:04:52 pm

Mike, if I was in your shoes, I would try to find core curriculum classes that will also help your major. Among these would be art classes in photography, art history and appreciation, film history or appreciation, composition or color, or sculpting, which is great to develop your 3-d skills... Or theatre: stagecraft/set design and/or lighting and sound. Music: appreciation, theory, or just learn an instrument - most editors I know play some kind of instrument or understand something about music. Try to get on the college radio station in some capacity. The school has a web site, see if you can make videos for them. The sports teams usually need someone to shoot games. In English, look for creative writing, something where you write or study scripts, or analyze good writing. Math or business? Take accounting, marketing, or business law: contracts are important to know... Languages? Take Spanish and/or Mandarin. Science? Take physics, learn optics.

And then also, take something just for the heck of it, because you're interested in it, or curious about it. This is the time when you are learning who you are and what you like to do, and you won't know what you like unless you sample new things. If the school offers travel abroad, you should go for it. That's always broadening: meeting really different people. I went into college planning to be a lawyer, and flipped major/minors after freshman year because I felt a stronger calling to what I do now. Thank GOD I saved myself from going the other way, and becoming wealthy and successful! Ask yourself; what if after four years, I decide I don't LOVE doing video anymore - what else do I have to fall back on? What's my minor?

Every year, schools with media programs pump out hundreds if not thousands of new people wanting to get into media in some capacity. To stand out, stand apart, and find/learn/do things the rest of your peers don't. Finding an under-served or specialty niche is key to getting above the entry-level jobs in this business. Get a skill that your competition doesn't have, whether that's underwater photography, a knowledge of dance, horsemanship, skill in 3-D CGI modeling, fluency in other languages, expertise in an obscure field, something...exotic.

As if you're not already too busy, join a student activity to socialize, or find a small crew of like-minded folks with theatre majors, and make your own unofficial "club" to go out and shoot short little movies and music videos on the weekends or week nights, instead of getting bombed at keggers. You are making future job contacts this way.

Apply for every possible internship and practicum, paid or not. Participating companies tend to hire more from this pool than off the street, but even if they don't it's great for networking and getting recommendations/introductions.


Also, never mind Andy's trolling: He blames the industry for his own problems in adapting to it. If anything, let his case be a cautionary tale for you: you are entering the workforce at a time when the old paradigm of the "social contract" and single-employer-for-life is pretty much dead. You live in a post-wave culture where you will likely undertake not just five different jobs, but five entirely separate careers. Careers where you will have to re-educate yourself, learn new things, and start at the bottom all over gain, time after time. A good portion of your coursework today may become obsolete in a decade. You are training now for a field of work that doesn't even exist yet. What you are learning today, for the next four years, is HOW TO LEARN, how to become an adaptable, fully-sentient Professional Human Being.

When you emerge, you will have the tools to make a living at "something"; whether it's actually your major or not. More than half of lawyers today don't do "law" work as we think of it. The majority of Fortune 500 CEO's have Liberal Arts Degrees; if they got MBA's it was later. The school is not, nor should it be, a factory stamping out identical robot workers, ready to plug into dead-end work. It should be generating Renaissance Men and Women, people capable of adapting to and mastering ANYTHING.


Education in this sense never stops until you stop breathing. Everyone you meet is a teacher, of *something*.


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 3:23:13 pm

Mark hit the nail(s) right on the head. Adaptability is the key word - you'll always find the Andys of the world poisoning the waters and telling you it can't be done - move right past them and leave them in the dust.

No...it's not going to be easy, but what worth doing is easy? I started out in music, earned a good living with that for close to 20 years, decided to settle down from traveling, and lucked into a job at an ad agency which specialized in television. It was a small shop, so I got to write scripts, do sales cold-calling, work as a grip on 16mm film shoots, (as film was transitioning to videotape), and do lots of voice-over work. I read all of the technical books I could find, did anything I was asked to do, and it turned into a career. I'm still learning every day - as soon as you think you know enough, you're finished.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Bob Zelin
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 4:37:30 pm

Hi Mike -
I will be "beaten" by this esteemed group on this forum for my opinion. But it's my opinion. I am now 58 years old. My parents wasted a tremendous amount of money sending me to college. Like you, I was motivated. I wanted to be in this business. To this day, I have no idea of what college was about, or did for me, other than teaching me discipline about learning. I was always told "you will appreciate this one day". I am still waiting for that day (I am an electrical engineer). Everything I learned was from internships, cheap entry level jobs, and going to work for guys that simply were not willing to hire a real professional, and took a chance on a "kid like me", because they hoped that I could "wing it". You already have a lot of basic skills. With motivation, that it appears that you have, you can continue to learn, and get real world experience, without a single day of college.

However, college will give you access to meeting a lot of cute girls, and going to crazy party's, that you might not have access to if you go to work right now.

With your background and knowledge so far, you can get an internship anywhere you want (like Biscardi Media !), and you will learn more in 1 year than you would in your 4 years of college. Trust me, you can get a GPA of 4.0, and not a SINGLE future employer will give a damn. They will only want to know what you can do (your computer skills with Adobe, AVID, etc.), and how cheaply they can hire you, so they can get rid of their "experienced" guy, because "this new kid" (you) can do the same damn job for a fraction of the price. And with experience behind you (like from Biscardi Media !), you will have CREDIBILITY, instead of saying "I got an A on my student film".

You are young. You don't really care about money now, and God only knows how much your parents are about to spend for college. You are better off picking your dream job right now, and go to work for them cleaning the toilets (believe me, you won't be doing that for long if you have any skills, but now you are in), and your parents money will be better served getting you a place to live near your dream job. In 5 years, you will look back, and you will be a 23 year old in a REAL position, making REAL money, meeting REAL clients, and your fellow 23 year olds will first be showing up with their resume, and student films, trying to get the internship job you did 5 years ago.

And if your parents are just dying to spend that money that they saved all these years to send you to college, have them buy you a REAL computer, and Adobe CC, AVID Media Composer, etc. and TAKE DIRECT TRAINING CLASSES from them (or a place like Future Media Concepts) and practice, and THEN get an internship. You will kick ass, and wind up knowing more than most of the "professionals" that you meet. And employers will recognize this - because you are young and cheap, and you will get an opportunity because you are young and cheap, and your fellow 23 year olds will know nothing.

But hey, what the hell do I know.

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
maxavid@cfl.rr.com


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Mads Nybo Jørgensen
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 4:45:11 pm

Well Mike,

As always Bob has got good points - nothing like "having a bit of fun".

However, in the world that you'll be working in, when the vacancy advert says "graduate", then that means graduate - as in that the initial software that does the selection for the now not so potential employer won't understand all your other qualities as in that your application didn't tick the box ;-)

The alternative is to build your own network, and the best place to start is at college, even if you only want to talk with the girls. But a nice place to make loads of mistakes, whilst learning, is not a bad place to be.

All the Best
Mads

@madsvid, London, UK
Check out my other hangouts:
Twitter: @madsvid
http://mads-thinkingoutloud.blogspot.co.uk


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Kylee Peña
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 4:48:53 pm

The only problem with skipping college right now is that a lot of video production is in-house. To get past the HR of a corporation or hospital or agency, they'll expect you to have a college degree in something. HR people can't translate years of experience.

College also opens up opportunities for internships. All the internships I did wouldn't have taken me if I couldn't do them for college credit. Markets will vary on this, but in Indianapolis there was an abundance of college kids trying to get in the door, they got priority.

EVERYBODY has been told to go to college, so now it's like the minimum requirement.

Just offering another perspective. Bob isn't wrong here, especially that most stuff you'll learn practically rather than in class.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 5:13:48 pm

Not to pile on our wise friend Bob here, because he's right that an "auto-didact" like himself CAN make a go of it... as an alternative path...

But as far as internships go, my take on it is that as a manager, trying to pick an internship candidate, the applicant coming from the college or university comes pre-qualified as someone truly committed to the work, financially and scholastically. If you screw up, your prof, your school, and likely your parents would be on your case. The intern applicant coming in "off the street" may have all kinds of zazz and charm, but without any more experience than the college kid, what proof do i have he or she can stick to a commitment or just consistently show up on time? A college kid who has to attend classes or fail has proof they are reliable. For some, that's what a diploma boils down to: a "receipt", proving you were able to make a 4-year or more commitment to achieve goals and that someone tested and rated you on the quality of what you learned in those 4 years. Like a certification on operating a particular editing system or a MS software certification. Though of course the Liberal Arts Majors will say, you get a lot more out of it than that. I think you do... if you put your mind to that.

Secondly, many businesses have exclusive internship deals with nearby schools. You can ONLY get into the internship after the school has run you thru some pre-qualifying studies to make you worth the company's time to take on.

So, not taking away from the rest of what Bob says, but I just disagree that any kid can get an internship without college classes in their background. It's not impossible, but I find it less likely than what Bob espouses. That said... You should of course try out for anything, anyway, because I can't be right about every damn thing every time.


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Tim Wilson
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 9:09:59 pm

The perspective of guys the age of me and Bob is that, when we went to college, NONE of this existed. I went to a large, well-heeled liberal arts college you've definitely heard of, 10,000 students (much bigger now of course), and ONE computer that students had access to. Punch cards, man.

Cameras under 75 lbs? Dream on. With no computers, there was no software. The industry as we know it simply didn't exist. It wasn't there. So the BEST we could hope for was learning how to learn in general, as well as some barely related stuff.

For example, cutting film taught me SOMETHING useful, primarily, media management = not letting strips of film fall between the desk and the wall, or else you have to move the desk to pick them up. Which sucks.

I'm talking about the days when the radio guys in my department had better and more lucrative job prospects than TV and film guys. That's another story, but it's an indication of WHY guys our age say the things we do.

Today is incredibly different. You actually CAN learn stuff that's DIRECTLY applicable - media management of files rather than strips of celluloid, workflows, and a vast array of other skills that DO exist today that did NOT exist 35 years ago.

Learning how to learn is still critical. It's conceivable that the environment you'll make your living with hasn't been invented yet, perhaps even moreso today than when Bob and I were coming up.

So while you're thinking about how to prepare for the job you want, don't forget to prepare for the job after THAT. Whatever job you want, this one or the next, don't forget to prepare for replacing your boss. You DO want to be in management some day, right? Or you can keep grinding away, trying to keep your job while your boss wonders why he shouldn't be paying some kid with a degree and an internship under her belt HALF of what he's paying you.

Or you can be the guy making the decision about that stuff. Better to prepare to be the guy holding the axe than the guy wondering when it's going to split his skull.


[Kylee Wall] "To get past the HR of a corporation or hospital or agency, they'll expect you to have a college degree in something."

Huge huge huge.

Microsoft and Apple were both famously founded by college dropouts. Given the growth in numbers of college graduates, how many people without a degree do you think they've hired in the last dozen years?Why the hell should they have hired ANY? I doubt they have.

So you need a lot MORE than a degree to get a job, but these days, you CANNOT have LESS than a degree. Not for a job that's going to sustain you across a career, or enable you to move up the ladder.

Note that it doesn't need to be a four year liberal arts program. There are many technical programs, as well as job-oriented programs at places like Full Sail.

Here's the thing I like about four year programs though, in addition to sex and parties -- neither of which I actually achieved in my four years of college, so caveat emptor. It's the opportunity to be surprised.

This is the field you want to get into NOW -- but you may find yourself a year from now thinking that you'd rather get into medical research, economics, law, fine arts, or, god forbid, education. You may find yourself more interested in DEVELOPING software than USING it, more interested in being in FRONT of cameras than BEHIND them.

The fact is that I think there's a lot to be said for lack of focus. LOL



[Mark Suszko] "many businesses have exclusive internship deals with nearby schools."

Also critical.

To Mark's earlier observation, there are single schools that are turning out THOUSANDS of students every spring all on their own. Beyond my experience as a student in a media program 35 years ago, I had a front row seat to this just a few years ago when I worked at Avid. If there are fewer than 200,000 students coming out of media programs next spring, I'll be shocked.

Again, this was not the case when guys my age were coming up. But it IS the case today. You'll be doing well to get an internship before your junior year. In many places, it's simply not an option. Employers can afford to be choosy.

This is starting to veer off topic, but I hope you're getting the gist.

I'm going to end by expressing my 100000% agreement with Bob on the need to be a relentless hustler.

With hundreds of thousands of new graduates for the industry to select from each summer, you need something to set you apart. I don't care about your reel. I expect you to be able to have a reel ten times better next year anyway.

I want to know that you will destroy every obstacle in your path to do what I want you to do. I need to know that you have no respect for anyone standing in your way. I want you to be a predator. Not that "Preditor" thing. PREDATOR, bloodthirsty, relentless.

AND with a degree, skills and experience, AND be pleasant to be around.

There. Does that sound so hard? Didn't think so. LOL


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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 9:38:01 pm

Or, you could always teach:-)


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Nick Griffin
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 23, 2013 at 10:16:51 pm

[Tim Wilson] "the radio guys in my department had better and more lucrative job prospects than TV and film guys"

OMG! You mean there was a GOOD reason that I started in radio? In all seriousity though... editing in the audio environment taught me more about editing in the video environment than I ever realized. It was years later when I started to figure out that I had developed deep-seated instincts in the audio production studio that helped me know when to the cut should occur. Oh, and that whole playing music thing, too. HUGE help on a very subconscious level.

But...if I could go back and do it all over again I'd spend a LOT more time taking every variety of writing course available. An overwhelming number of producers came up through writing and ultimately they're the ones who rise to the top.


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walter biscardi
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 24, 2013 at 12:13:06 am

[Bob Zelin] "And with experience behind you (like from Biscardi Media !), you will have CREDIBILITY, instead of saying "I got an A on my student film". "

We can all see how far your BCM internship took you Bob. Glad I could be a small part of your success. :)


[Bob Zelin] "and TAKE DIRECT TRAINING CLASSES from them (or a place like Future Media Concepts) and practice, and THEN get an internship."

And consider something like the Southeast Creative Summit which should have hundreds of creatives all taking workshops, networking and sharing knowledge. Workshop type events are awesome because there's so many folks and you learn during the day and swap stories and knowledge at night.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

Foul Water Fiery Serpent, an original documentary featuring Sigourney Weave...
MTWD Entertainment - Developing original content for all media.
"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.
"Science Nation" - Three years and counting of Science for the People.

Blog Twitter Facebook


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Bill Davis
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 24, 2013 at 11:38:23 am

I'm going off the reservation here, a bit.

Knowledge of HOW to do things is increasingly worthless in modern society. I appreciate the wisdom of those who've trod the traditional path of classroom study and internships and first gigs and hustling. And yep, it's all true. But it's also increasingly irrelavent - at least in terms of skills training.

College is an anomaly. It's a protected space between high school and LIFE where you're sequestered from the cold, hard truths of the world while either A) somebody else (like your parents) doles out vast sums of money in hopes you learn some marketable skills - or you load your life up with mountains of debt in exchange for a certificate that may be relevant in showing others that you have an advanced ability to fit into institutions and memorize stuff you can far more easily look up on your phone - then show up to take exams about.

If your going to do the university thing, here's my advice. It's largely about contacts and developing social skills. Period. There's nothing factual you'll learn that isn't sitting on-line somewhere already. What DOES exist in a university is a social pool of similarly privileged others who you can learn how to better interact with.

You want to come out of a college experience ahead?

Learn to recognize and develop relationships with other students, faculty and staff. Cultivate them. Relentlessly.

I honestly think college is about developing relationship skills. Not learning facts. Facts are on-line.

Learn how to pitch yourself to everyone you meet, quietly and with confidence. Honestly. Do it it with the academic stars, but also with the day to day everybodies. The guy who checks out the towels at the university gym is likely just as interesting as the dean. And possibly just as smart. And you should be ready and able to walk away from an encounter with either - and have them feel good about the interaction and be glad to see you the next time.

Learn to assess and categorize people with an eye to who might be valuable to bring closer, and who's a waste of time. It's not always obvious. Learn who you can depend on and who's a flake. Who is a relationship user and who plays fair. Who has habits you can learn from and and emulate and who's just there because it's expected by their social class or family.

I'm starting to believe very strongly that in a world where all the process knowledge is in everyone's pocket and searchable, actual "how to" knowledge is getting less and less valuable, very fast.

What will be left, IMO, is people skills. The ability to make people WANT to pick you out of the sea of qualified others. And that's all about high level personal interaction skills.

Period.

Learn THAT over the next four years.

And try to keep the debt thing under control. The burden of a decade or more of monthly student loan payments to finance four years of "higher education" in a world where you can maybe watch the exact same classes on-line via iTunes is kinda nuts, IMO.

Remember, lots of us writing here spend as much time "studying" stuff as any college student. We've been doing it for decades. We've just stopped calling it 'school" and paying for it directly -and have started calling it what it really is - our lives.

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 25, 2013 at 8:26:01 pm

Bill, I agree with some of your thesis. However...

I have met/worked with people that are the extreme exaggeration of what you're advising. They are fun to talk to and work with... until the first time you need them to actually produce or make something, to show up and be present in the moment and DELIVER. ...and you realize the only gear this flake ever actually operated on their own was a phone and an espresso machine. And that they are so busy networking and being social, they tend to drop out on you at key moments for something more "immediate".

To be clear, that's an extreme version of the "it's not what you know" person. But there are talkers and there are doers. Talkers can get in the door easily. But they don't stay long.


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Bill Davis
Re: Video Production in College
on Jul 28, 2013 at 6:50:25 am

[Mark Suszko] "To be clear, that's an extreme version of the "it's not what you know" person. But there are talkers and there are doers. Talkers can get in the door easily. But they don't stay long.
"


Yeah Mark, No quarrel with your point.

I just remember all the "recent college graduate" folks I've come in contact with over the years. Long on theory and short on how to actually get stuff done.

We've all had them on a set now and then.

I agree with you completely that the real test is if they've got the skills, but most of us value "real world" experience FAR more than theoretical learning.

We'll NOT call back a crew person even if they have some technical skills, but can't handle the social aspect of on-set work. Walking across a camera line. Taking a call on a set when they're supposed to be working. Being aware of what needs to be done before anyone mentions it and taking care of it. None of that has to do with techniques. It's the real world experience we all value that makes a set run smoothly and keeps everyone working toward the project goals.

I kinda see the social stuff I'm talking about as a part of that. It's not just "contacts" - its putting yourself around people better able to share practical knowledge with. A college buddy who helps you land your first on-set gig is great. But one who knows you well enough to drag you aside and tell you when and why you're fitting in (or not!) is priceless.

That's the relationship stuff that really matters.

I wish I'd known about that stuff way earlier in my career.

FWIW.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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