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Curious About the English Term

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Simon Roughan
Curious About the English Term
on Apr 23, 2013 at 3:55:54 pm

Please look at this picture...
http://s3.amazonaws.com/everystockphoto/fspid30/26/51/71/8/childs-news-read...
Is there an official term for the picture behind the newsreader that pertains to the story shes talking about?
For example, in german its called a "Hintersetzer" ie something thats set behind. (Dont ask my why, ze germans, zey are crazy)
Is there a comparable term in english?
Thanks in advance
Simon

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know.


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 23, 2013 at 4:33:57 pm

Although it's on a monitor in this frame grab, the standard term in the Broadcast industry has always been OTS, or Over the Shoulder. It's often abbreviated to Slide, as in Over The Shoulder Slide.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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Mark Landman
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 23, 2013 at 9:04:37 pm

I had 1 news director that I worked with that referred to it as an 'insert', everyone else called it an 'OTS' (Over The Shoulder).

Mark Landman
PM Productions
Champaign, IL



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walter biscardi
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 23, 2013 at 9:17:08 pm

I'm pretty sure at CNN we called it Box Left, Box Right depending on which side it was on. Made for an easy command to the camera people and TD at the same time.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Todd Terry
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 4:52:35 am

I spent much longer in TV news than I cared to ("I'm not a journalist, but I play one on TV")...

An OTS is a term you'd hear sometimes... but not to the degree where I'd consider it quite an official term. Having worked at one network affiliate, and visited other television stations as a "journalist" (also making air quotes with my fingers), and many more directing promos for various stations... I think it's almost safe to say that just about everywhere I went called them something different.

T2

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Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Simon Roughan
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 8:59:43 am

Gentlemen, thanks for the feedback.

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know.


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Juris Eksts
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 12:08:08 pm

Another meaning of OTS or Over The Shoulder, used to be the shot during an interview of the interviewee, over the shoulder of the interviewer, showing part of the interviewer.


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 1:30:06 pm

Ah...we called those Reaction Shots. Just goes to show that's there's really no standard in the industry; just one facility to another. Of course there were also outside producers - mostly from ad agencies, who would come in and call all the graph supers "camera cards", just to show you what they knew (past tense is very correct here)...

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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walter biscardi
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 1:33:03 pm

Some other fun terms from my CNN days.....

SLUG - Title of the story, I believe that came from newspaper days.
MOS - Man on the Street interview
SOT - Sound On Tape usually meant an interview
NAT - Natural sound
Donut - Pre-created element with a hole in the middle for current video, like a show open.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

Foul Water Fiery Serpent, an original documentary featuring Sigourney Weave...
MTWD Entertainment - Developing original content for all media.
"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.
"Science Nation" - Three years and counting of Science for the People.

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Mark Suszko
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 1:59:26 pm

You get to hear lots of behind the scenes chatter on remotes when they plug your headset into the IFB and PL channels of the intercom. It is common the hear "gimme a 2-box", to show two different shots, each in it's own PIP (picture-in-picture) box, across a master background.

At CNN's PL line for example, they refer to a screen full of 4 or more, smaller, individual screens as the "Biggie Smalls". I'm always wondering, when I hear that, if I'm going to hear some rap music next..:-)


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Tim Wilson
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 2:33:12 pm

[walter biscardi] "MOS - Man on the Street interview"

MOS is also a term from film production. It means picture only, no sync sound, but what the letters stand for is a hilariously long list of wildly divergent possibilities.

The top candidate in my mind has always been "motor only sync," but a legend attributes it to any number of directors (I've heard Germans Lang and Lubitsch and Austrians von Stroheim and Wilder among others) saying that they wanted to shoot "Mit out Sprechen" and "mid out sound."

The English term for "man on street" is "vox pop" (for vox populi)...so, to the point elsewhere, there are fewer standard terms than you might think. :-)


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Simon Roughan
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 1:35:25 pm

Yeah, I think the OSS (over shoulder shot) picture composition is a pretty standard term. I have books on scriptwriting, and directing, and they all refer to this as an "OSS" shot.

The more I learn, the more I realise how little I know.


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Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Curious About the English Term
on Apr 24, 2013 at 6:27:29 pm

And I think that differentiates it well from the OTS, which is the news broadcasting Over The Shoulder Slide, which, of course, I know as a Reaction Shot. Yipes! It's a wonder anything gets done - but part of my job as Art Director was indoctrinating the new graphics people as to the terminology in our facility. It wasn't even standard with some of the terms the kids were coming out of school with, which would depend on their teachers' experience, and the text books they used.

Another good one, which seems to be a standard, is the Mortise Shot, which refers to boxed video (in various sizes, crops, and positions) which is inset, like a picture in picture. We never called it that at our facility, but we didn't have TDs, so it was only important that the Director new what shot he wanted. There was a two box (mostly for reporter on location), a three box, and sometimes even a four box (used mostly during political coverage.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


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