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Video Exposure

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Roy Schneider
Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 12:53:13 am

Hi All:
I just finished Producing/Directing and Editing a Music Video for an up and coming Country Artist.






I am not so sure they know what to do with it now that it is finished. Has anyone had any experience promoting a Music Video for an Indie Act? Where can I put it to get exposure? I know the major outlets are slim to none until it gets out and played, so wondering if any of you might have some advice?

Thanks! and Long Live the Cow!
Roy

Roy Schneider
Long Live Da Cow!


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Alex Elkins
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 9:58:41 am

Hi Roy,

I'm not familiar with the Country & Western music scene at all, but there must be online forums where people would be interested in seeing it. There may even be a Country & Western music TV station - I've no idea as I'm not in the US, but it seems fairly likely in certain parts of the country.
The bottom line is that despite the women in bikinis, a track like this isn't going to be played on MTV, so the web is probably the band's best (and possibly only) outlet, so just get it out there and tell the people who are into the music about it (or rather, tell the artist to do that...)

One thing that struck me having opened the video on YouTube is that you have fallen into the trap that lots of indie music video directors fall into, which is to assume that the most important piece of information to add to the video description is who shot, produced, directed and edited the video. You've even said it was shot on a Scarlet and edited in FCP. Whilst I might be quite interested to know that, I'm not your audience. Most of your audience doesn't care what you shot it on and probably doesn't even know what an editor does. Just get the guy's website details up there, some tour dates, maybe even the lyrics. BTW, you've also listed it under the 'Sports' category.

So to get back to my overall point, just sell it to the people who want to buy it. The artist himself is the best person to do that as he'll know the online places where people go to hear this stuff.

Alex Elkins
Twitter: @postbluetv
http://www.postblue.tv
Post Blue showreel
Latest work: Greyhounds in Motion at 500fps
My Vimeo Pro page


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Chris Tompkins
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 1:23:54 pm

YouTube. (Get your metatags/keywords right)

The Bands website.

The rest is up to them.

Chris Tompkins
Video Atlanta LLC


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Fernando Mol
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 3:20:41 pm

Yeap, right now it's under the "Sports" category.


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Roy Schneider
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 1:48:19 pm

Hi Alex and Chris:
Thanks for your input. This link is actually to my Production Company's youtube account. We do have posted to the Bands page with info about the band, and their music and more music oriented tags. My responsibility as Producer is done, but I am just trying to help the artist a little. If there were some places to post to get exposure, I was going to help them get it out a little.

Thanks again!
Roy

Roy Schneider
Long Live Da Cow!


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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 3:14:47 pm

itunes, Vimeo. Amazon. Send emails to CMTV with links. What's your goal here; get the song some airplay on radio, or sell CD's or what?


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Roy Schneider
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 3:47:06 pm

The ultimate goal is to sell CD's! That's how he really makes money. The exposure is just a means to the end.
Roy

Roy Schneider
Long Live Da Cow!


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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 4:02:16 pm

I hear most bands now barely break-even on albums, due to pirate downloading; they make their real money by touring and selling merch at the concerts. I suggest you make some more videos that are kick-boot concert demos, and use those to get on the circuit playing small venues and trying to get to SXSW, the county and state fair circuit, and any other such festivals. The song in the demo is an okay single, but it's highly formulaic. Well, that's redundant, most country-pop is formulaic. Doesn't mean it isn't popular. What I mean is, he needs a couple more good singles, and they need to be more distinctive without getting too different from the comfort zone of the listeners. I'd suggest a slow-dance ballad with a change-up in the instrumentation, more mando and uke, maybe. And a gimmcky pop number that's funny and pokes fun at some universal truths in current culture. Then a good old boy drinking song with a blues thump to it. Oh, and have him cut a duet for either a breakup song or a getting-back-together number. Those should cover the bases.


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Todd Terry
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 3:23:49 pm

A zillion years ago in a previous life when I was in broadcast television, for a couple of years I produced a half-hour country-music video show on our local NBC station. It was a daily half-hour show, and one day a week we'd produce a week's worth of the shows. At first I felt a bit saddled with that job, as I pretty much loathed country music (although in that job I began to appreciate it). And it was kinda fun... plus we got a lot of free very nice lunches out of it... since we are only two hours south of Nashville it was common for record labels to drag their artists down to be guests on the show and end up wining and dining us at some fancy restaurant, schmoozing us for more airplay for their stars.

One thing we learned (at least at that time, I'm supposing that it might still be true), was that every single country music video was funneled through the same clearing house. It was a company in a tiny little old house just off music row... which was (at that time) crammed floor-to-ceiling with U-matic video tapes. This one place was responsible for getting out any and all of the videos to all the networks (CMT and the like), individual stations, and other outlets. I suppose they were contracted by the record labels, not sure how that worked.

Of course, for the life of me I don't remember the name of the company. But if this kind of setup is still in existence, they'd be one source for people to call, bug, and bother until they gave you a listen.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Roy Schneider
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 3:49:59 pm

Thanks Todd:
Are you thinking of Aristomedia? They are a big video promoter and seem to be the guys that do that.
Roy

Roy Schneider
Long Live Da Cow!


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Todd Terry
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 4:22:12 pm

[Roy Schneider] "Are you thinking of Aristomedia?"

Yep Roy, I think so... the name sure sounds familiar.

They were extraordinarily helpful, as I recall. Of course, they were schmoozing us, trying to get us to help them by broadcasting their stuff. I'm not sure what it would be like if we were the ones asking for the favor.

Actually I learned a lot about country music and the videos in that era by having to watch so many of them. Firstly, it must have been a federal law then that said the videos had to start with a little story-telling vignette where the artist had to try to act... and sadly most of them couldn't act their way out of a paper bag. And every video had to be crammed full of dutch angles. Probably half of them or more were directed by the same guy (whose name escapes me), so a lot of them looked the same. They all pretty much had to be see-n-say, too... if there was a line "...in my old pickup truck..." then you had to cut to a shot of that truck. They were very very literal. When I was shooting a lot of 35mm (now, not so much) the colorist at the film lab we used (formerly Motion Picture Laboratories, in Nashville, now Encore Media) used to spend his days watching endless hours of that footage... and he hated country music even more than I did.

Ah... good times.

T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com



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Mark Suszko
Re: Video Exposure
on Oct 2, 2012 at 4:31:28 pm

If you play country songs backwards, you get your job back, your house back, your wife and dog back....









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