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WebMastter Businesss

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Richard CardonnaWebMastter Businesss
by on Jan 7, 2012 at 7:28:51 pm

I am a producer editor for events and cable broadcast content. Thing are not as good as it was some years ago by I still make a living.

However I have been doing more and more web ended projects and many of my clients ask me if I could manage there social media (facebook,youtube...)

I Know the basics of this but i don't have a business model for this type of enterprise and would like info on how to structure and set rates.
Can anyone give me some advise?


I don't know if this is the correct forum, If not lead me to one that could answer my question.

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Nick GriffinRe: WebMastter Businesss
by on Jan 8, 2012 at 8:14:56 pm


First, yes. This is the ideal forum for discussing your question.

I don't see that there's much difference between being in the "webmaster" business and the post production business -- except for the fact that the post business requires that a much larger dollar amount of equipment needs to be maintained.

As you can read from any number of posters below and in the archives, you have to calculate what you personally need to live, what you need to save, what you need to have for recurring expenses (rent/mortgage, utilities, auto, accounting, legal, etc), what hardware/software configurations you need to keep current and last, but far from least, what you have to set aside for taxes.

Once you've added those up, come up with a realistic number of hours you can bill for in an average month (which does NOT include the time you'll spend marketing your services and doing general business stuff) then divide the costs by the hours to get a STARTING point for figuring out what your hourly, daily, weekly billing rate should be.

Of course you also have to be aware of your competitive environment. If your client knows the college kid living in his parent's basements is willing (and reliable enough) to be his webmaster for $15 an hour, your business may not be viable. In that case the value you add, the number of prospects you have and many other factors come into play.

One last thing, and I don't mean this in a mean-spirited way, if you're going to be doing a company's social media you will have to be very careful of grammar and spelling. The little stuff matters when it's someone's public image.

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Richard CardonnaRe: WebMastter Businesss
by on Jan 9, 2012 at 4:28:39 am


I don't expect to be doing web pages(but who knows), The work will mostly be serving the social sites, some videos and flash animation (soon html5)

I would need to now how to structure this business for what It will be doing. I would like to seee an organisational chart and job descriptions that apply.

thanks for your input. BTW English is not my native tongue The work asked will be.


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Richard HerdRe: WebMastter Businesss
by on Jan 9, 2012 at 6:56:17 pm

Before the big recession, I did a lot of social media for a big ol' company. The kind of business will matter, too. For example suppose it's a bar, then you'll want to be there during any promotions.

In terms of equipment, it will depend exactly what kind of business is involved. For the bar, I would want to be there with my iPhone and immediately upload updates and prizes and redemptions.

An accounting firm's social media needs would be vastly different.

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