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Archiving Question

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Larry MeltonArchiving Question
by on Jan 10, 2011 at 2:05:43 pm

Hello All:

Recently purchased a Canon 60D to shoot video, and I'm pretty amazed at what it can do. But as I was moving footage from my 32GB SDHC card to my edit system, it occurred to me that these cards might be incredible archiving tools.

I've been backing up projects to Blu-ray, but it takes a long time to burn a disc, and the rewritable ones are pretty pricey. I can pick up a 32GB SDHC card for as little as $50 (don't need the higher speed cards for this), it's re-writable, and the transfer speed seems to be much faster than burning a disc. The projects can also be extracted on any computer using a card reader.

Just curious if this sounds too good to be true. Any reasons this might be a bad idea?

Thanks,

Larry Melton
Triangle Productions Inc


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Nick GriffinRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 10, 2011 at 7:37:29 pm

Larry -
Does the manufacturer claim any particular shelf life for the card's DATA? My greatest fear with any form of back-up is what will be there when you need it in 5 years? 10 years? Didn't I read somewhere that even CDs and data DVDs are only reliable for less than 20 years -- provided that they are kept cool, dark and dry? Hard drives, also regarded as quite cheap based on their capacity, have to be spun up every few months to remain viable, and even then to be truly safe you should maintain redundant hard drives. We'd all probably benefit from some reliable and authenticated research into all types of back-up.


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Patrick OrtmanRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 10, 2011 at 8:59:21 pm

I agree. And, don't necessarily take this as a data point, but I've read some stuff on (other site) about how compact flash cards are indeed very reliable at least in the short term (hundreds of read/write cycles, thousands of cards, no problems).

I just couldn't accept the backup time...

---------------------
http://www.patrickortman.com
Web and Video Design


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Mark SuszkoRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 10, 2011 at 9:59:27 pm

It is an interesting question. For some peole's neds, another factor to consider is how fast you can make useable dubs off that archival master. The mechanism for rapid duplication and printing of additional BluRay disks is well understood and inexpensive. I suppsoe somewhere out there there are bulk cloners for flash media, as there are for thumb drives now. But what will your future *customers* need a dub on? For the next 5 years, maybe, I think it would be BluRay disks and not flash memory media. But I could be wrong.


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Rich RubaschRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 10, 2011 at 10:41:47 pm

Also, Dual Layer BluRay discs are as low as about $6.00 US and 25 gig much less. I am now considering archiving the self contained final movie (ProRes 422) and the FCP, AE and Photoshop files in addition to our standard Hard drive backup. Also having a pile of small SD cards laying around or in a binder of sorts in small 32 gig chunks doesn't make as much sense to me as a hard drive that can hold 1 terabyte for about the same amount...

So a hard drive backup for the bulk of the media to open the project in the next couple years or so, and a BluRay in case the drive (and its mirrored backup hard drive) as a last ditch effort to get the project back.

Lots of backups, lots of data floating around....wish I had a shelf full of tape...

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production and Post
Owner/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Bob ColeRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 11, 2011 at 5:32:18 am

[Rich Rubasch] "Lots of backups, lots of data floating around....wish I had a shelf full of tape..."

You still can - sort of. LTO-3 is $27 for 400 GB. It does take a long time, but if you can offload files to another computer for the admittedly time-consuming backup to tape, it isn't so bad. That said, Blu-Ray looks better and better as the capacity increases.


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Richard CooperRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 11, 2011 at 8:46:24 am

Here is an interesting article from right here on the Cow.

http://news.creativecow.net/story/865351

Richard Cooper
FrostLine Productions, LLC
Anchorage, Alaska
http://www.frostlineproductions.com


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Richard CooperRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 11, 2011 at 8:48:02 am

Here is an interesting article from right here on the Cow.

http://news.creativecow.net/story/865351

Here is the direct link to the compant web site.

http://www.Cache-A.com/

Richard Cooper
FrostLine Productions, LLC
Anchorage, Alaska
http://www.frostlineproductions.com


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Craig SeemanRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 11, 2011 at 1:00:42 pm

Depending on your business model, Blu-ray should be fine.

Nothing is forever and, all vanity aside, neither is the value of many of our projects.

One can't make a blanket statement about optical discs since, like any other media, quality of the disc as well as method of storage have impact.

Personally I don't trust anything that's rewritable (eg. hard drive) and dependent on mechanics.
I'm also wary of anything dependent on the ease of access of playback devices (my D2 and 1" tapes may be fine if only I can get easy access to the machines to check).

About 15 years ago I ran a multimedia dept. at a large facility long since defunct. The quality CDs still open in any modern computer . . . now if only the programs and operating systems were still available to use the content.

I can't speak for other businesses but, assuming Blu-ray drives will still be available 20 years from now, I'll be quite happy if the discs last that long. I'm not sure if the corporate videos and local cable spots will have much value at that point.

Certainly you may want to arrange to have your feature films, documentaries, award winning commercials preserved after we push beyond this mortal coil but one may consider how much of your work will be of cultural value 50 years hence?

Over 40 years ago my father (who is still with us) produced, directed, animated Clio award wining commercials and some stellar documentary footage. The 35mm film is long gone. Fortunately, they were dubbed to 3/4" and later the crumbling tapes copied to DVD and his best work lives on.

Realistically for most of us, 20 years will do just fine as long as we pay special attention to the parcels of creativity that will have value beyond that. Key is choosing quality media and also choosing a format in which playback will be readily available a couple of decades hence.



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David Roth WeissRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 12, 2011 at 12:39:12 am

I'm not sure BluRay will be around for 20 months, much less 20 years, and neither are the big studios. I suspect there will be lots of lost video over the years until someone creates a more permanent video record than the media types we're using now.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles
http://www.drwfilms.com

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Business & Marketing and Apple Final Cut Pro forums. Formerly host of the Apple Final Cut Basics, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Craig SeemanRe: Archiving Question
by on Jan 12, 2011 at 3:45:08 am

[David Roth Weiss] "I'm not sure BluRay will be around for 20 months, much less 20 years"

Don't confuse video playback with archive. CDs as data recording have hung on for a long time even as their popularity has wained. In fact almost every computer one can buy except netbook or tablet can still handle a CD. As long as there are Blu-ray burners or readers, you'll be able to read your disks. A technology doesn't have to dominate, it just has to be readily available. I don't doubt flash media will be dominant in just a few years but compared to optical disc, there's still a number of years before you can get a reliable 25GB for $1. When I can buy a GOOD 32GB card for $1 or the equivalent price per GB for the prevailing size, then that time will have arrived.



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