BUSINESS AND MARKETING: Business and Marketing Forum Business and Marketing Articles

Learn this

COW Forums : Business & Marketing

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>

Mark SuszkoLearn this
by on Jul 29, 2010 at 11:38:56 pm









Return to posts index

Tim WilsonRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 3:32:17 am

FANTASTIC video! Thanks!

Two more things to learn:

1) New York is not just the greatest city in the world. It is the center of the galaxy, if not the entire universe. Go with the flow.

2) As amazing as that cab driver was, never take a cab from La Guardia to midtown. Ever. Almost without exception, American cabs are used police cars. The back seat is where the PRISONERS used to sit.

Spend the few extra dollars for a town car. You'll arrive feeling comfortable and fresh, and not like you've been riding for 30 minutes in a prisoner compartment. Dude, not even the WORST prisoners spent that long in the back of that cop car. Town car.


Seriously, though, this is a truly great presentation. Thanks again!

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine

My Blog: "Is this thing on? Oh it's on!"

Don't forget to rate your favorite posts!


Return to posts index

Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 5:00:54 am

1) New York is not just the greatest city in the world. It is the center of the galaxy, if not the entire universe. Go with the flow.


We Chicagoans are easy-going enough to let you folks keep on believing this, long as it makes you happy.


Return to posts index


Tim WilsonRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 6:10:03 am

>>>We Chicagoans...<<<

...live in the SECOND City.


Return to posts index

Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 3:11:25 pm

Hey, New York is a lovely city too.... you gots a very nice place over by dere...


...be a shame if somethin' was to... "happen"... to it....

ANYWAY... let's concentrate on this guy's speech and what we can take away from the cab driver story.


Return to posts index

Tim WilsonRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 7:05:55 pm

In all seriousness, here's a bold suggestion: show me your mission statement, I'll show you mine.

The thing is, I don't have one. I used to. Not just for my job as a whole, but for every mission my team undertook. It was that simple idea that if you don't know where you're going, you won't get there. It's actually bigger than that. Distilling the essence of your job/role/task, etc. to a sentence that makes sense when spoken aloud gives you clarity, and even power.

None of these fake "marketing" sentences, either. No words that your parents or kids don't understand. The goal is clarity. The adjectival form of "essence" is "essential."

So I'm going to work on this. Everyone else should too, and share the results with the class. We can help sharpen each other's focus, and maybe even learn something about what each of us actually DOES.

I said this in my first post on this thread, and will again - a GREAT video.


Return to posts index


Terry MikkelsenRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 7:19:54 pm

For those struggling with a start, here's the mission statement for my Dad's greenhouse business:

"Your supplier of choice, for premium propagated plant material."

I've always loved the first part (your supplier of choice). We realize that you have chosen us. We intend to do business respectfully so that you continue to choose us.

Tech-T Productions
http://www.technical-t.com


Return to posts index

Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 7:34:31 pm

My informal one is just this: Solve the client's communication problem, and advise the client, thru your expertise, as to what you think is in their best interest; not just what they want to hear, but what they need to know.


end of line





That mission statement doesn't say anything specific about video, because frankly, not every problem is truly solved by making a video. If there is a more effective thing they can do, as the guy they picked to advise and solve their need/problem, you are honor-bound to say "this may cost me business, but you should do x instead".

The few times I've had to do that, it has never cost me business. Not any that I would miss, anyway. The guys that just nod unquestioningly and take orders to make crap product that they know won't work, don't make lasting relationships with clients, and are the first ones cast aside when the ill-advised project doesn't meet expectations. I think they give our business a bad reputation, which only depresses the market for all.

We are in the communications problem-solving business. Not a commoditized hardware business. We use whatever techniques and technology we need to do the job the way we think best.

Oh, and I'm taking this goldfish out of the office with me. Anybody coming with?


Return to posts index

Steve MartinRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 7:39:13 pm

I like a challenge. I've never actually stopped to think about our mission statement.

When I read the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, the author, Steven Covey, indicated that the exercise of developing a mission statement can be painstaking process of writing and re-writing. I gave it some thought at the time, but never actually did it.

So here goes the first rough-cut. From a professional standpoint as it relates to what we do, I think my company's mission statement might go something like:

To use technology to effectively tell our client's stories with creativity, honesty, and integrity.

Sounds accurate, but kind of lofty.

Production is fun - but lets not forget: Nobody ever died on the video table!


Return to posts index


Tim WilsonRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 8:07:23 pm

[Mark Suszko] "We are in the communications problem-solving business. Not a commoditized hardware business"

Brilliant point. While I'm still chewing the cud on a bovine mission statement, we talk a LOT about how we are NOT in the web business.

Your informal statement is a wonderful start. To Steve's point below, you can probably turn that into two sentences for readability, and still take full marks for clarity, brevity and impact.


[Steve Martin] "....t the exercise of developing a mission statement can be painstaking process of writing and re-writing."

It really is! Especially when you have a whole lot of people working on it. It's funny, too - the first suggestions are almost to tweak a word or two, but it doesn't take long before somebody offers something COMPLETELY different. Often a direction that has nothing to do with the original one. They start to reflect what each of the stakeholders feels is most important.

Having a unified mission statement starts to feel like a uniform, in the best possible sense. You have your individual contributions to make, but when you put it on, you're ready to GO. You feel pride in being a team, and ready for anything.

[Steve Martin] "'To use technology to effectively tell our client's stories with creativity, honesty, and integrity."

Sounds accurate, but kind of lofty."

Lofty can be a problem for a slogan or motto, but is perfect for a mission statement. How often do we meet our own standards? The mission statement is a reminder of what those are, and challenge ourselves to do better.

Not to be all rah-rah, because by nature, I'm not. But the process of distilling vision was always my favorite part of being in the "business" world.

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine

My Blog: "Is this thing on? Oh it's on!"

Don't forget to rate your favorite posts!


Return to posts index

Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 8:21:30 pm

Tim, you reminded me of the scene in Robocop 2, when they "update" Robocop's Prime Directives. In the first movie, he had three basic generic rules in a clear hierarchy. In the sequel, the company focus groups and marketers get involved in his update, and add in hundreds more imperatives, some of them conflicting, many of them trivial, and Peter Weller's cyborg character can't hardly walk and talk, much less fight a bad guy, because his processors are maxed out grinding thru all the glop.

My feeling is that mission statements, like some video projects, can get bogged down when the clients try to put too many things in with equal weight and conflicting goals. Kind of like email sig files: if they are longer than the message they are attached to, you're doing it wrong.


Return to posts index

Tim WilsonRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 10:13:51 pm

[Mark Suszko] "In the sequel, the company focus groups and marketers get involved in his update, and add in hundreds more imperatives..."

I forgot about that - hilarious!

It happens that our team goal was to get it down to one sentence, with no more than two commas. We'll see if I can pull that off on my own.

[Mark Suszko] "Kind of like email sig files: if they are longer than the message they are attached to, you're doing it wrong."

Mine is in haiku, so it reads shorter than it looks. :-)


tw


Return to posts index


Bill DavisRe: Learn this
by on Jul 30, 2010 at 10:46:49 pm

I had the incredible fortune to land the National Speakers Association as a client early in my career.

I spent countless hours in the back of the room manning a camera for literally hundreds of professional speakers - from motivational to humorous, from nuts and bolts topics like workplace safety to some of the most inspirational speakers you can imagine.

What an education. I ascribe probably 75% of any success I've ever had in business to that gig.

Jack Daly is one of the very good ones - I never had the pleasure to see him speak live, but over the years I've heard the best of the best and came away from each session inspired as you have.

One of the most interesting lessons of that era for me was after some years of hearing speaker after speaker that chewed up the stage with energy and talent and vocal skills - It was a rumple-suited very old gentleman of the oldest school in the world - the school of hard knocks - that impressed me the most.

Guy named Og Mandino.

He wrote a barely 100+ page book called the Greatest Salesman in the World - and watching him drape himself across a lectern and (hardly moving for nearly an hour) he had every single person in the packed audience hanging on every word he uttered from first to last by the power of the story under the delivery.

That guy was something.

If you ever get a call from an NSA member - that's the National Speakers Association - and they want you to tape them. Its often worth doing that gig yourself.

My 2 cents anyway.

Oh, and ABSOLUTELY mission statements are hugely valuable business asset for clarifying thinking and keeping a team on the same path. I'd add to that having a 1 minute pitch MEMORIZED whenever someone asks "what do you do" (your elevator pitch) - and TELEPHONE skills for when you're connected brain to brain with a decision maker.

This is the stuff that they don't teach you in video school. And that's a shame.



Return to posts index

Nick GriffinRe: Learn this
by on Jul 31, 2010 at 3:43:30 pm

[Tim Wilson] "we talk a LOT about how we are NOT in the web business."

If I may be so bold as to offer an opinion, the COW is NOT in the web business, nor the magazine business, nor the educational DVD business. The COW's core strength and raison d'etre is that it is in the COMMUNITY business. It uses the aforementioned tools as its means of building and serving that community. And I, for one, am damn grateful that it does.


Return to posts index

grinner hesterRe: Learn this
by on Aug 5, 2010 at 8:48:02 am

jolly good stuff.
Forgetting to be the best is a common mistake in all business.



Return to posts index


Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Aug 3, 2010 at 2:02:09 pm

Little early to let this topic fade, isn't it? Or are you guys all just working hard on your versions?


Return to posts index

Terry MikkelsenRe: Learn this
by on Aug 3, 2010 at 8:23:46 pm

In case you need some more sparks, here are a select few Fortune 500 companies' mission statements:

Maxtor
500 McCarthy Blvd. Milpitas, CA 95035

Slogan / Motto
What Drives You

Description
Catering predominantly to the computer industry, Maxtor provides computer parts, components and technologies which include consumer electronic devices like personal computers, and storage products such as enterprise storage, desktop storage, external storage, and network storage. It also offers computer hardware such as servers, hard drives, floppy drives, etc.

Mission Statement
To strengthen and grow our leadership position by providing storage products across a range of market segments, including desktop computers, consumer electronics, midline and nearline storage systems, and high-performance servers.




Microsoft
1 Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 98052-6399

Description
A highly recognized software company, Microsoft provides a range of technology products and services. Its well-known products include the often used Windows operating system and the Microsoft Office.

Mission Statement
At Microsoft, we work to help people and businesses throughout the world realize their full potential. This is our mission. Everything we do reflects this mission and the values that make it possible




The Walt Disney Company
500 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91521

Description
The Walt Disney Company operates a global entertainment portfolio of Media Networks, Parks and Resorts, Studio Entertainment, and Consumer Products. This wide array reaches out to the world through its television broadcasts, Internet businesses, theme parks, and the many ventures of The Walt Disney Company's subsidiaries.

Mission Statement
The mission of The Walt Disney Company is to be one of the world's leading producers and providers of entertainment and information. Using our portfolio of brands to differentiate our content, services and consumer products, we seek to develop the most creative, innovative and profitable entertainment experiences and related products in the world.




I really like the one from Microsoft. In case you didn't know that what you were reading was their mission statement, they tell you within the statement that its their mission statement. VERY clear now.

Tech-T Productions
http://www.technical-t.com


Return to posts index

Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Aug 3, 2010 at 8:30:55 pm

I didn't much care for any of those three, myself. The Disney one in particular only depressed me.

"The mission of The Walt Disney Company is to be one of the world's leading producers and providers of entertainment and information. Using our portfolio of brands to differentiate our content, services and consumer products, we seek to develop the most creative, innovative and profitable entertainment experiences and related products in the world."


could be shortened to:

The mission of The Walt Disney Company is to develop the most creative, innovative and profitable entertainment experiences and related products in the world.

Fixed that for you, Walt.


Return to posts index

Tim WilsonRe: Learn this
by on Aug 4, 2010 at 4:07:29 am

[Mark Suszko] "Fixed that for you, Walt."

Actually, that would be Steve. :-)


Return to posts index

Mark SuszkoRe: Learn this
by on Aug 4, 2010 at 7:12:51 pm

I meant fixed it in memory of Walt, not the guys in charge now.


Return to posts index

grinner hesterRe: Learn this
by on Aug 7, 2010 at 8:45:52 pm

My youngest son is 10. He just started his own business and I sat him down in front this video. We talked about it afterward and lil man soaked in exactly what I was hoping he would. When I asked him the philosophical statement of this clip he quickly responded "be the best and the money will follow."
atta boy.



Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]