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Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...

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Ned MillerLooking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 4:53:03 pm

Go to:

http://www.myragantv.com/ME2/Sites/Default.asp?SiteID=2DE73B54303942C4AC9E7...

and scrub to 1:12

Forget B&H, hello Best Buy. And I was considering buying into the DSLR craze? Will they make a 3D Flip soon?


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grinner hesterRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 5:22:16 pm

I missed the reason for a bridge.
I did get a kick out of the funny lookin' kid dressed as a business dude though.

These are simply the times we live in, man. While large crews and budgets use to be required for all things video, technology has made it so a video can be uploaded for dang near nuthin'. Not all video has to be, or should be, top notch quality... just the video people pay us to make. Low end productions do not take from our dinner tables... they add to them.



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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 8:27:09 pm

Grinner,

They don't consider it "low quality" like we do. They consider it "just fine", which is what used to be our mid-level. So it is taking food off my table (I'm experiencing it) in terms of these were once jobs they used to call us pros for, when they couldn't find a cheap kid they could trust.

Later,

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
http://www.bizvideo.com


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Milton HockmanRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 9:08:46 pm

Ned,

I've seen other posts of yours on the Cow talking about being "defeated" by the Flip Video Camera.

If this small gadget is costing you clients, then maybe you need to readdress your business model. It seems in your market, the way you were acquiring clients, and making a profit is not working as well anymore. That means its time to change.

Who were your main source of clients? If it was ENG kind of stuff, we have to face the facts, that market has changed. Its all about quick, cheap, video for these folks. Get something usable that can spread the message.

Heck, I've even seen on CNN them using SKYPE for interviews! How are you going to compete with FREE?? You're not, the news networks and local channels have changed their game.

Might be time to move on to bigger fish, man.



Freelancer Designer Virginia - StephenHockman.com
Find out more about me, see my portfolio, and read my blog

Graphic Design Info, Web Page Tips, Video Production Guide BLOG
My blog updated weekly with industry tips, tricks, and news


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Mark SuszkoRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 8:35:44 pm

I find it ironic that this ragan site's videos touting these new "media approaches" are themselves rather badly and stiffly shot, poorly lit, with weak sound, and without much thought to camera shot placement or editing as part of the communications vernacular. Certainly they are not leveraging all that the combination of visuals and sound can deliver. When you can't do something professionally, I guess instead you mock it or marginalize it.

And some of them, like the Monsanto guy on that page, talking about social media and speechwriting, have a ridiculous and unnecessary "second camera shooting off-axis in B&W for no flipping reason" effect, which is something that was "cool" when MTV started doing it like fifteen years ago. It is not cool now. Not for a long time. You had a second camera and you wasted it shooting THAT, when you could have shot double-coverage with two angles from the good side, with a purpose. Brilliant.

I could make better video than this, without spending much at all.
These guys are still in "dancing bear" mode with these flipper fratcams, i.e.: "it is not that the bear dances well, because he doesn't - the attraction is that he can dance at all." They are right that it's not always about expensive tools. They are wrong about not needing actual skill in employing the tools. Sloppy and careless work doesn't evoke "authenticity" or "immediacy", so much as simple incompetence and indifference. And if you don't care enough to craft a good message, why should I care enough to watch it?




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Mark SuszkoRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 8:39:00 pm

Just once I want to grab the guy that uses those stupid unmotivated off-the-eyeline cut-aways, and interrogate him:
"Just what is this shot supposed to be telling us? Do you even know why you are using it?"

http://forums.creativecow.net/readpost/17/869748


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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 8:44:56 pm

Oh sorry, my point was that Mayo Clinic, THEE Mayo CLinic, is doing this. There's a lot of shooters in MN that they use...

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
http://www.bizvideo.com


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Todd TerryRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 9:00:24 pm

I'll use my partner's "piano" analogy.

Go around and visit people... friends, family, whomever... and you'll notice that in quite a lot of homes there is a piano. There it is, right in the living room.

Finding a concert pianist is a lot harder.

Some of those people can play that piano a bit, some might even be pretty good. But it's rare to find someone who is really great.

Those flip cams and the like, with their dirt cheapness and all, have put the piano in everyone living room. But they haven't created any better piano players.

If one's business was mid-to-low end corporate work, yep... I'm betting that biz takes a hit. But, as least for what I'm seeing, for higher-level corp work and for broadcast work... there seems to fortunately still be an appreciation for pros who know what they are doing. Fortunately almost all of what we do is broadcast and those clients still, for the most part, realize doing it right takes a pro. Hopefully that won't change soon.... but it might.

Technology of course is getting better and better, and is now taken for granted. I remember years ago when a cable installer at my home marveled at my plasma set... he'd never actually seen one. And visitors to our studios would say "Wow!" when they saw the big plasmas hanging in the edit suites. Today, no one gives them a second look... or as much regard for what's playing on screens everywhere, sadly. It's almost amusing that as technology keeps getting better and better, the content quality acceptance level has gone right into the crapper.

I think the best we can do is concentrate our efforts on clients who know, see, and appreciate the difference in "good" and "eh... good enough."


T2

__________________________________
Todd Terry
Creative Director
Fantastic Plastic Entertainment, Inc.
fantasticplastic.com






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Mads Nybo JørgensenRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 9:22:31 pm

I have to confess too that I don't see the danger in the Flip and its brothers either. This can only be a business opportunity where my firm can offer to edit Flip video for clients and go back and re-film for those who wants it to look even better.

At any given stage some technology and the poor sod operating it has been killed off by something cheaper and easier to use - AV technician (Slide creator) by Power Point, Paint-Box operator by Photo-shop, Camera Crew by Flip and so forth. All new things has one thing in common, which is that our corporate clients can not in a cost effective way operate any of those gadgets to a decent level professionalism whilst also holding onto doing their day-job. And managing the intern to do it, is just too much hassle in comparison to hiring us. Unless it is a small so & so video, which they would never have spend money on the first place.

There will always be a strategic inflection point for getting in & out of an idea - the BIG question is when and where to hit the curve at the right point :-)



All the Best
Mads
London, UK

Latest video to watch here:


Mac Million Ltd. - HD Production & Editing
Blog: http://macmillionltd.blogspot.com


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grinner hesterRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 8:46:43 pm

That's just it. More companies are utilizing video today, first because it was easily done. Once they see the impact, savvy companies have no problem spending a little bit... and a little bit goes a long way today. What was a crew of 5 and a week of post at 500 an hour a decade ago is now a dude with a camera and a laptop for a flat grand today. Who is that good for? Everyone involved. The key is to get involved. Old schoolers sticking to their guns on rates and packages will do it all alone as billing goes elsewhere. It's as easy as competing and the way we do that will always evolve.

Gone are the days of the overpaid specialist... unless your specialty becomes doing it all.



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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 9:53:19 pm

This is the problem with internet communication, I am not properly communicating my point. My point is:

THIS IS NOT "LOW END" VIDEO. I have shot many dozens of hospital videos, some for external, some internal comm. They always paid full day rate. Some had in-house (very sophisticated) post facilities, some went out-of-house for post. There was a trend towards attempting to do-it-yourself, or hiring cheap kids, but they tended to call in the pros when all the switches and such flummoxed them, or the CEO had to look great. But now with this damn Flip, they are taking what used to be high and mid range quality, which paid shooters and editors rates, and poof! It's now gone.

And the reason I post this today is that this example is THEE Mayo Clinic, meaning they have money, and it's happening around the Chicago area with Fortune 100s as well and it's coming to a client of yours soon. I promise. And they aren't looking for a generalist rather than a specialist, they are looking to keep it all in-house, some for a speedy turnaround, some to save money, others to be the popular in-house "video guy", etc. And we can say they've now made what used to be upper or mid-range video barely acceptable (low end), but as long as they are "happy" then it is upper end to them, and it's work they used to farm out that is now, permanently, in-house.

I have never seen something accepted so rapidly that has had such a negative effect on professional video production in terms of hiring professionals. Every house now has a piano and unfortunately they are happy to hear the kids playing "chopsticks".

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
http://www.bizvideo.com


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grinner hesterRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 10:04:27 pm

This just means you either have to become happy to play chopstix quickly or confident enough to advertise a well-honed symphony.
Chopstick players sell more classical pieces with original flair than old school account executives with bad ties.



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Nick GriffinRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 10:32:55 pm

[Ned Miller] "Every house now has a piano and unfortunately they are happy to hear the kids playing "chopsticks"."

Yea, and the sad fact is they're happy because they are THEIR kids. God forbid any of you have a marketing or project manager get their hands on any kind of editing system... even iMovie. Suddenly they fall in love with their own work, even when it's pure crap. It's THEIR kids and they're blind, deaf & dumb to any faults. When "good enough" gets mixed up with "saving money by staying in house" with "proud we did it ourselves" it's easy to be hosed.

Solid sales techniques and deep relationships are the only way to combat this, and sometimes even that doesn't help.


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David Roth WeissRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 29, 2010 at 11:06:28 pm

[Nick Griffin] "When "good enough" gets mixed up with "saving money by staying in house" with "proud we did it ourselves" it's easy to be hosed.

Solid sales techniques and deep relationships are the only way to combat this, and sometimes even that doesn't help."


I agree with Nick. Just because the current flavor of the month that sells easily at this moment in time is cheap homemade crap, no matter how anyone wants to try to spin it (Grinner), it's still cheap homemade crap.

And, just because some of us choose not to settle for cheap homemade crap, that doesn't mean we're stupid, or that we're dead meat, or that we're out of touch, it just means we don't settle for cheap homemade crap.

Face it, if you get known as the guy/girl who creates cheap homemade crap, you'll be making that same crap the rest of your life.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™

EPK Colorist - UP IN THE AIR - nominated for six academy awards

A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 1:03:13 am

Read:

http://blog.visiblegains.com/index.php/business-casual-video/

THIRD PARAGRAPH DOWN. This sums up what I have been experiencing, propelled by the recession and now with the ease of one touch cameras, a trend among clients to eschew a polished look. This blogger terms it "casual video", what we call a low end look. I guess I am the only one seeing clients, big clients with LOTS of money, trending towards this "do-it-ourselves" look? They don't consider it "crap". And it's lost revenue for me.

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
http://www.bizvideo.com


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Mads Nybo JørgensenRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 1:15:05 am

Hey Ned,

If you really, really want to take the position from the loser angle - go right ahead and be one, don't let me stop you, but please don't drag me down with you either.

Video on the Internet, ipad, Digital Signage, mobile phone - it will be big time and it will be everywhere. So what? In the last week I've done 25 videos, reasonable budget, all to end up on the internet only - they won't make me rich or famous, but I'll be able to pay my rent for another month + I am already upselling with a view to use the same footage in their shop window and on a DVD.

An even better job, today I've been asked to help a client set up a Skype two-way for an overseas conference - again, won't make me rich, but they are hiring me to do something that previously would have required an SNG van - at least I won't be the one loosing out on buying one of those.

Rather than becoming the pessimist; seize the moment, become the consultant, the one who can help your clients with how to operate their Flips, get decent light, make a decent picture, edit it - they'll love you for it and you will be their first port of call for all future requests + you will make a bundle of money too, whilst putting somebody else out of business.

But if you stick yourself in the corner looking like a baby without its dummy - then that is what you'll become.

Cheer up!!!


All the Best
Mads
London, UK

Latest video to watch here:


Mac Million Ltd. - HD Production & Editing
Blog: http://macmillionltd.blogspot.com


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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 1:21:11 am

What city are you in? I'll move there.

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
http://www.bizvideo.com


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Mads Nybo JørgensenRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 2:01:41 am

London - and there is always space for one more here :-)



All the Best
Mads
London, UK

Latest video to watch here:


Mac Million Ltd. - HD Production & Editing
Blog: http://macmillionltd.blogspot.com


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David Roth WeissRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 2:19:14 am

[Mads Nybo Jørgensen] "London - and there is always space for one more here :-) "

And, if you want to eat Chinese food at 2am, London's Chinatown is the only place I know that has hundreds of restaurants to accommodate you. Mads showed me that. They don't call him Mads for nothing...

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor/Colorist
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™

EPK Colorist - UP IN THE AIR - nominated for six academy awards

A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Chris BlairRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 1:07:27 am

David Roth Weiss: And, just because some of us choose not to settle for cheap homemade crap, that doesn't mean we're stupid, or that we're dead meat, or that we're out of touch, it just means we don't settle for cheap homemade crap.

I have to agree with David. If it's crap, people will eventually tune out and it will damage a company's brand.

And I think Ned's point is that even if he he went out and got a flip camera today and promoted that he does this type of work...it wouldn't matter. Because the work is being done in-house with no intent or desire to go out of house. This would be understandable if it were companies with small communications budgets, but companies WITH budgets are doing it (hence his reference to Mayo Clinic).

I think a lot of this is reaction to hype. The camera has gotten alot of publicity, it's dirt cheap and it's easy to operate. That doesn't magically make the people operating it good communicators.

It's no differnt than the perception that creating videos that had a "youtube" look would draw attention. We lost some jobs over the last couple years to clients wanting that look. We even went so far as to create samples with no lighting and shaky handheld camera work...and the clients commented it still looked "too professional." They actually WANTED the video to look amateurish. In one case, they produced it using students (it was a college recruiting video), and later, when they asked a group of incoming students to evaluate it, they all hated it and said it looked "amateurish." So much for the "youtube" look.

In that case, I think it was a case of 40 and 50 year old marketing people creating what they THOUGHT young kids wanted to see...and it fell flat on it's face. I think viewers are more saavy than people give them credit for. If it's crap, people will tune out.


Chris Blair
Magnetic Image, Inc.
Evansville, IN
http://www.videomi.com


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Milton HockmanRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 2:00:08 am

I agree with Mads Nybo.

Ned, you're letting this Flip Video Camera defeat you.

I think its time to change your business model. Keep your head high.

The topic of your thread "Looking for a high enough bridge to jump off of..." is pretty disturbing.

Freelancer Designer Virginia - StephenHockman.com
Find out more about me, see my portfolio, and read my blog

Graphic Design Info, Web Page Tips, Video Production Guide BLOG
My blog updated weekly with industry tips, tricks, and news


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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 2:22:04 am

Oh, I meant the bridge metaphor figuratively. A couple of beers will do the trick.

I am moving towards rekindling all my non-fiction TV clients since that end of the biz is more impervious to this cheapness movement. The History Channel and such at least has standards. I am very busy now, compared to the slowness of Jan & Feb, the problem is "busy" now doesn't mean neccessarily mean profitable, like the "old" days.

Ned Miller
Chicago Videographer
http://www.nedmiller.com
http://www.bizvideo.com


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Mark SuszkoRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 3:01:40 am

"Busy" now doesn't mean necessarily mean profitable, like the "old" days. "

THAT is a True Business Fact that many people don't understand, Mads. "Busy" with Flip cameras doesn't even pay for, well, a Flip cam itself.

I feel upbeat about this. After the initial buzz and ill-advised uses, eventually those flips will spend most of their time in desk drawers and purses only to come out for office party videos and kid's school projects. This is what people do; they overdose themselves on what's new, then they get bored and move on to the next gimmick, and what's left are people who can apply skill to the tool after the casual users have given up on it. Look at the history of the inexpensive Russian Lomo cameras; cheap cameras with bad optics, and today, they are pricey collector items for artists that use the Lomo's weakness to give their pictures a unique quality.

The Flip is kind of like the $30 First Act half-size kid's guitars sold in walmarts and Target stores. At the price, it's a disposable impulse buy and an easy entry. Most will dabble with the thing a while practicing all of two chords until they can't tune it, and abandon it after a month or when they get their first finger blister. A smaller number will eventually go to a music shop for replacement strings, try out a $150 or more expensive guitar, and walk out of the store with that. A smaller number still will go buy a 68 Tele with custom pickups. They are all making music, sure. There's room for all of them.
But I'm not going t buy an album from most of them.


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Emre Tufekci S.O.A.Re: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 2:24:10 pm

"Solid sales techniques and deep relationships are the only way to combat this".

I agree with Nick's approach of better marketing and selling the "quality" that they themselves cannot provide. Here is my case study.

We recently did a project for 3 major hospitals and they wanted a powerpoint meets boring very simple/cheap/easy project.

We sold them a "crazy idea" that included FX work and a lot of resources that they had to provide to make it work. In the end we have received nothing but praise from them. They for one will not be going to the flip camera anytime soon.

Here is the link:


Points of interest (opening and 07:15)

PS: The opening was shot with a HVX200. I gave the cameras to the 2 actresses with no instructions in how to use it so we could get the amateur feeling. The final shot is actually a HPX3700 colro matched to the HVX200.

Any other broll or scenes were shot with a HPX2700/HPX3000 on a Steadicam Ultra 2.

Emre Tufekci
http://www.productionpit.com



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Mark GrossardtRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 30, 2010 at 3:07:46 pm

It seems to me that there's a great opportunity here. Video used to be something only big companies could afford to do, but now everyone can jump on the video bandwagon. Once video has become a part of the way these other companies do business, some are eventually going to want it done better. Keep your relationships with these companies, encourage them to use video where ever they can, and gently remind them that you'll be there when they're ready to do it better.

The crude analogy: Think of the Flip as the gateway drug. Encourage them to get hooked on video, and then make yourself available when they start craving the "hard" stuff.



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Rob GrauertRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Mar 31, 2010 at 2:02:04 am

has anyone ever thought to compare emergence of cameras like the Flip to the emergence of all the cheap, high quality digital still cameras?

There is still a lot of work in the photography industry, despite all the cheap cameras. I don't think the Flip camera will really hurt many professionals in the video industry either.

...just my two cents.

Robert J. Grauert, Jr.
http://www.robgrauert.com
command-r.tumblr.com


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Timothy J. AllenRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Apr 1, 2010 at 1:31:34 pm

Exactly, Rob.
We use everything from Varicams to Flip Mino HDs. The wisdom comes from knowing which tool to use when to get what you want or need.

Have we ever used the Flip cam when in retrospect, I'd rather have gone with something more high-end? Of course. Have we ever used the Varicam when upon reflection, we should have gone lower-end? Absolutely.

There's a tendency to want to use the "new hammer" just because it's new. You learn as you go and hopefully get better about choosing the right tool for the right job.

This summer, when our interns come in and we want them to grab some "man on the street" type clips to augment a quick website article are they going to get to use the Varicam, lights and our full-time Videographers to guide them on their technique? Let's not get expectations too high. I have a Flip cam in my desk drawer waiting for that job.

By the way, that's not because they are students. The purpose of the finished video - it's content and the intended "feel" - plays a huge role in the tools we choose to get there.





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Mike CohenRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Apr 1, 2010 at 1:55:37 pm

It is amazing how many posts there have been so far in 2010 about feeling threatened by cheap HD cameras. Hundreds of posts probably.

I think Tim summed it all up:

[Timothy J. Allen] "The wisdom comes from knowing which tool to use when to get what you want or need."

Indeed, this wisdom is what people pay us for, not just our tools.

We are content experts, problem solvers and media professionals offering a service, not just a warm body with a camera.

Value selling is reminding customers that when they hire us, they are getting the whole package, and our past experiences, to help them accomplish their goals.

Mike Cohen


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Ned MillerRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Apr 2, 2010 at 1:37:36 am

Original Poster Ned here, hopefully last post, but it came up AGAIN today:

Just got back from filming the Secretary of Labor for an old time DC client who does mainly govt agency outsource videos, big budget govt PR documentaries and live events for cabinet level honchos. He's been around the block and I have worked with him for about eight years when he needs midwest shooting.

He complained to me, without me prodding, that clients are calling him up and asking him to incorporate, or make something from scratch, with footage they took with their Flip cameras. At least he gets the editing!

So, all these posts about value, up selling, the work will come back when they realize it's crap, it's just a trend, etc. are ignoring the present fact that these are bona fide shoot days that are now gone, poof! G-O-N-E. Shoot days that just a short while ago would have gone to us pros because they couldn't figure out their little $3000 DV cameras. Perhaps if there are no kids in-house that know iMovie we'll get the post, but my original point weeks ago when I first mentioned "DP is replaced by a Flip", is that it's hard to measure lost work unless they happen to mention it. Have you asked your clients?

Unlike all that has come before, which had lots of buttons, switches, needed to be white balanced, etc. the one button Flip invites shooting even by chimpanzees. In Point, Out Point, Compress + Upload. Just a short while ago that was an intimidating process for most of them and they called in the Pros from Dover, even if it was video destined for social media or intranet sites. Perhaps your client base is impervious and you don't need to worry about lost work that has gone in-house, but I can tell you I have been seeing it among many different organizations (Mayo Clinic, etc) that do not need to penny pinch. If you have or can latch onto a client that appreciates quality and your creative input, and pays decently and on time, you should appreciate how rare they are becoming and how lucky you are. I have been doing this a long, long time and this market is quite different. We are in a business where prices and revenues are actually coming down, and not just from the recession. Remember just a little while ago how much we all made on VHS and DVD orders? The Flip allowing clients to "think" they can DIY is part of the same steamroller.

Naturally when a recession hits they bring video in-house, I've seen it twice before since 1976, but now the Flip has made it "enjoyable" for them to do their own crappy looking videos that they are, unfortunately, tickled pink with. It's not "low end", if they have no capability to DIY they would have budgeted for pros to produce, and those video budgets could have gotten to mid-range. When corporations create budgets for their next fiscal year, and let's say Marketing, or PR, or HR, whatever, needs a line item for video, well I think video is becoming a commodity to them, that is what I am seeing. Forget the Flip for a moment, it's just a symptom, the underlying problem is that video is becoming a commodity to them and the Flip allows them to exercise that theory. It's no longer the arcane alchemy art/voodoo of ex-hippies and artists, it is something they think (I said "they") anybody can now do, since after all, "they" are proving to themselves anyone can do it.

Look at Chicago's Craigslist under creative gigs for instance: advertising agencies with more money than God are listing for young Final Cut wizards for $10 per hour, if not as a free intern. You don't think those graphic savvy kids can pimp up Flip footage? A few posts ago a prod co owner said he sends out his interns with Flips, are the Varicams as busy as before when you back out the recession?

There's still quality work out there for us pros, like me filming a cabinet member today, problem is there's just thinner slices of the pie, and the pie has gotten smaller. That's why I'm not going to market to corporate as much and going back to non-fiction TV.

And today when I woke up I didn't think the subject of a Flip stealing work from pros would come up until my DC client mentioned it. That's it, my last thread on this, if you don't see this downhill trend God Bless You!

Ned


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Milton HockmanRe: Looking for bridge high enough to jump off of...
by on Apr 6, 2010 at 8:15:02 pm

now that you've laid it out more clearly I understand why you are so upset about the flip camera. (not knowing your day rate) its easily taking 300-500 out of your pocket a day from shoots "you" used to get hired for.

I'm not a videographer so I don't know how it is out there for you all. But as a designer and editor I've learned that Video doesn't feed my plate every day. So, I took it upon myself to learn website design and print design. Now I offer 3 services: Web, Print, and Video. Allowing me to create full campaigns or a la cart items for clients.

Is there anything like that as a just a videographer that will allow you to have more sources of revenue and not just these corporate clients using flip cameras?

Maybe you can expand your shooting by offering editing too?

I just don't know too many videographer only's out there. But that may just be me and my network.



Freelancer Designer Virginia - StephenHockman.com
Find out more about me, see my portfolio, and read my blog

Graphic Design Info, Web Page Tips, Video Production Guide BLOG
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