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Newbie Scheduling Question

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Angelia KaneNewbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 7, 2010 at 7:31:16 pm

It's always been a goal of mine to host & produce a show, but I have no video or film production background.

To start, I want to host/produce an information and lifestyle show for entrepreneurs. It would feature real-world resources and occasional guests. Starting with virtually no budget, I'd be shooting everything myself.

One of my challenges in producing the show is figuring out how to plan my shoots around my unpredictable schedule.

Being based in the NYC area, there are a ton of potential guests and events to feature.

But how can I flexibly plan these shoots? There are going to be times when I may be able to shoot once a week or on a good week, shoot 2-3 times a week. How do the *pros* plan for situations like this?

Thanks for your advice,

Angi
bedtimeceo.com
@bedtimeceo



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grinner hesterRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 12:14:31 am

Just book guests around your schedule and once booked, stick to it.




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Angelia KaneRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 1:36:42 am

Ok, just to be more clear... because I have young kids, my weekly schedule's 70% predictable. I'd hate to book interviews or plan to shoot an event weeks in advance and then have to bail.

So, the question is: how do producers plan shoots with a high degree of unpredictability from week-to-week?

Thanks again!

Angi


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Gav BottRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 2:06:33 am

Cold truth is - they don't.

Once you say "please turn up at this time for the shoot" that is pretty much set in stone - your word is your bond etc. Unless you’re OK paying them twice and re-working your schedule for the next time they are free for a shoot?

The way to deal with it is to build in a back-up plan, in this case someone who can cover your role if you can't make it.

Chances are the people you want to come in and be filmed will cancel at late notice now and then - but you can't. Well, not if you want anyone to show up ever again......

Thanks

Gav


The Brit in Brisbane
The Pomme in Production - Brisbane Australia.


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Ron LindeboomRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 5:36:27 pm

[Angelia Kane] "how do producers plan shoots with a high degree of unpredictability from week-to-week?"


They don't -- at least if they want to be a real producer.

When it is clear that appointments are "intangibles" whose transience is based on outside circumstance, then your accounts won't take you serious and you will be relegated to hobbyist status. No one else will take you serious.

As Gav Bott says, the only way around this is to have someone else as your back-up in case you can't make it. But if you are going to play it that way, sign the contract as a company coming to fulfill a specific contracted service, not as you doing it. That way they won't feel like they got the B Team.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom
CEO, CreativeCOW.net

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry


First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
- Gandhi


Better is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with the poor spirits who neither enjoy much, nor suffer much because they live in a gray twilight that knows no victory or defeat. - Theodore Roosevelt





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Angelia KaneRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 6:09:20 pm

This is helpful guys. Thanks.

So, that leads to my followup: what should I look for in a producer for this type of show? What low-budget resources can I use to find a reliable freelance producer in the NYC area? It's tempting to try to find someone for free, but won't I just get what I pay for?

Angi


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Ron LindeboomRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 9, 2010 at 11:46:08 am

[Angelia Kane] "What low-budget resources can I use to find a reliable freelance producer in the NYC area? It's tempting to try to find someone for free, but won't I just get what I pay for?"

The only way to make it in this business when you have no experience, no money, and no track record...is to build your own track record, one job at a time, on your own sweat and tears. (Blood comes only if you work on a job with Bob Zelin.) ;o)

There is no substitute for experience and you will either get it working for someone else (recommended), or by building your own porfolio/reel/history (one mistake at a time, until the mistakes stop).

There is no way around it, and unless you were born with a silver spoon in your mouth and can afford to pay people to do your job for you, you are the one who is going to have to build your own company -- for a while, at least.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom
CEO, CreativeCOW.net

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry


First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
- Gandhi


Better is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with the poor spirits who neither enjoy much, nor suffer much because they live in a gray twilight that knows no victory or defeat. - Theodore Roosevelt





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grinner hesterRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 5:45:12 pm

We just don't bail on bookings.



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Steve WargoRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 5:28:38 am

[Angelia Kane] "How do the *pros* plan for situations like this?"

They hire staff. That can be family, friends, or students but you just don't do it yourself. You can, of course, but why? Just to prove a point?

I would say that you are absolutely clueless on what's involved in doing a professional job. Please note the word "Professional". Anybody can do it halfast.

Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona
It's a dry heat!

Sony HDCAM F-900 & HDW-2000/1 deck
5 Final Cut (not quite PRO) systems
Sony HVR-M25 HDV deck
2-Sony EX-1 HD .

Ask me how to Market Yourself using Send Out Cards


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Shane RossRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 8:05:45 am

Most of us have kids, and work in this professional video world. When we schedule an interview, we MAKE that interview, unless an emergency interferes. That is the only real valid excuse for cancelling it. Get a sitter, or help from friends. If you want to make this a profession, you need to behave professionally. Schedule around the kids as much as you can, but stick to it when you do.

And if you don't have ANY experience doing this, and you want to get into it, I highly suggest trying to find work at a production company in some capacity first, so that you can see how things are done.

Shane



GETTING ORGANIZED WITH FINAL CUT PRO DVD...don't miss it.
Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def


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Timothy J. AllenRe: Newbie Scheduling Question
by on Mar 8, 2010 at 10:21:13 pm

Angelia,
My advice is pretty simple. You try to build in predictability on your end as much as possible. For instance, arrange for childcare on certain days each week and book shoots on those days as much as possible... and pre-enlist help that you can depend upon when those emergencies come up.

I've been fortunate that in more than 15 years in the business, I've never to have had to leave a shoot for an off-set emergency. (Knock on wood!) On the other hand, I re-scheduled one shoot three different times this month, due to the changing schedule of a CEO. I don't control their schedule, so I don't sweat it. For my own team, I try to keep things I *can* control predictable, and stay flexible for those things I can't control.

One way to build in predictability is to work with the same production team - or at least the same videographers - on a consistent basis. If I'm working with a new team, I make sure to have a pre-production meeting to make sure everyone is on the same page regarding the goals of the shoot and my planned approach to get there. That way, if I did have to leave suddenly, I can feel reasonably confident that I could delegate leadership and we would still end up with something useful on tape - even if its not the same as what I would get if I was on set the whole time.

The key is building a trustworthy team in both areas of your life, personal and professional. The way to do that is to demonstrating that you are trustworthy. (For instance, ALWAYS show up on time and always pay your crew on time or early.) It takes time to build that team that you know you can depend on, but it's well worth it.

Best of luck to you!



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