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How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?

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Thomas HughesHow Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 1:06:21 am

We're a video production company. Years ago, when we got internet to our office, AT&T DSL was the only provider available. Currently our internet speed is 5 mbps down/.7 mbps up, and we pay $70/mo. I had AT&T out yesterday to see if we can speed things up. He said that’s the fastest they offer this building at this time unless we did a T1 line. He said that would be $400/mo, 10 down/2 up.

I just hung up with Comcast Cable. They now offer service to this building. My neighbor down the hall has Comcast internet and is really happy with it. Comcast said they offer to this building: $60 – 12 down/2 up, or $100 – 22 down/5 up, or $190 – 50 down/10 up.

If we went from what we have now, 5 down/.7 up, to 50 down/10 up, besides having faster access to the internet and downloads, in what areas would it affect our productivity?

1 – would our access to our server be faster (since both the internet and our server are piped to our office computers over the same ethernet cable)?
2 – would our blog uploads be faster? If yes, a lot faster?
3 – are there other areas that our type of business would benefit that I’m not thinking of?

Thanks so much. Any input is appreciated.


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David Roth WeissRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 2:00:22 am

You need to determine the sweet spot at which you're receiving fast service, but not overpaying. The T1 line certainly seems excessive, especially as you're not exactly certain what benefits you'll actually derive. I would consider taking the middle tier from Comcast if I were you. It's offers over 400% better performance than your present DSL, for just $30 extra per month. Pretty much a no-brainer if you ask me.

The primary benefits are faster file sharing with clients, faster upload to YouTube, faster over Internet access, and yes, your blog should upload much faster because, if my math is correct, 5mbps is nearly 7X faster than .7mbps.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Steve WargoRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 13, 2009 at 10:51:26 am

When we tell a client we are uploading something for them to look at, they expect it in the next 15 seconds.

Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona
It's a dry heat!

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5 Final Cut (not quite PRO) systems
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2-Sony EX-1 HD .

Ask me how to Market Yourself using Send Out Cards


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walter biscardiRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 13, 2009 at 12:42:42 pm

[Steve Wargo] "When we tell a client we are uploading something for them to look at, they expect it in the next 15 seconds.
"


Which is why I always tell them when it will be there.... As in your file is uploading, it will be ready for you in 10 minutes, or something like that.

Or I simply wait until it's already uploaded and THEN tell them to go get it.



Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"Foul Water, Fiery Serpent" now in Post.

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Mark RaudonisRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 4:01:13 am

Tom,

We have a T-3 line and still people complain it isn't fast enough! I guess it's all relative, since a fat pipe used by many people is no better than a thin straw used only by one.

I would say to you that fast internet connectivity will be CRITICAL to all facets of business in the very near future. We're already using the web for review and approval, and our usage has increased tremendously over the past few years. There are applications and uses that you may not have even thought of that will depend on high bandwidth and reliable connectivity.

I personally believe you can never go wrong by OVER estimating the amount of bandwidth you will be needing. More and more uses for the the web pop up everyday.

Buy as much as you can possibly afford... you WILL use it.

#1: Internal server? No. Has nothing to do with internet access. You local switch and cabling will control that.

#2 Yes. Faster. Alot faster!

#3 Of course you're not thinking of them! That's why you're asking the question. Here's just a few:

Email, internet viewing, uploading of videos for review and approval to either web based servers or
FTP servers. Communication with outsourced accounting services will be faster. VPN's if you've got one will be faster. Plain old browsing will be faster.

Good luck.

mark

mark



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walter biscardiRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 9:16:52 am

Fast internet speed is absolutely critical to our success. The majority of our clients work remotely so all of them review their work on our MediaBatch service. Even clients local to Atlanta predominately work remotely with us just because they can and they feel they can be more efficient not driving in.

We currently have 18 down/2 up from Charter Communications locally, though we will be switching to AT&T as soon as they get their high speed service, dubbed "U-Verse" in this area.

Just how fast you need just depends on your production needs. You can always start out at a slower speed / cheaper price and then upgrade very easily to the next speeds. That's what we did here with Charter. Started out at something like 6 up / 2 down when we first started and each of the last 2 years increased the speed and upgraded the modems. They're more than happy to upgrade you to a higher priced bracket. :-)



Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"Foul Water, Fiery Serpent" now in Post.

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Ron LindeboomRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 5:50:31 pm

[Thomas Hughes] "when we got internet to our office, AT&T DSL was the only provider available. Currently our internet speed is 5 mbps down/.7 mbps up, and we pay $70/mo. I had AT&T out yesterday to see if we can speed things up."

DSL is best described as the "illusion" of having high-speed.

For years, we had DSL as our back-up access for the rare times that our cable failed. On the rare times when we would have to use it, it felt like we climbed into an old Ford Model T and took it out on the freeway. It is nowhere near the kinds of speeds that you need to use the internet today. (We do not build the Cow for dial-up modems or for DSL customers, if we did, we would have to leave out much of what's here. So we, as the site developers, have elected to not consider them when we build this site. We had to make that decision because it would limit us too much to build this site with DSL users factoring into our decisions.)

AT&T would come in bragging and full of crap about their "DSL speeds" until we mentioned to them that their service was merely a back-up to our real access which was a commercial cable modem. That said, and they just quietly finished their work and would get out of there.

DSL beats the heck out of a dial-up modem but it's a far cry from the cable company's cable modem service.

The T1 is overkill for what you want to do. You do NOT need it.

We build the COW and do all of the video uploads and tutorials, podcasts, etc., etc., all with a cable modem access.

We wanted to get a T1 but they don't offer it in our area. (Man, the choices you get, we're drooling! We pay three-times the money for 20 down 2 up, than the money that you would have to pay to get your 22 down 5 up.)

With all the problems that we have had with AT&T over the years, I would NEVER sign a service agreement with them. Ever. If I had to use them, I would only do so on a month-to-month. There's no way I'd sign a contract again. The cable company may suck but in our experience, AT&T is many times worse -- at least in our area.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom
creativecow.net


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Mark SuszkoRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 6:52:03 pm

My hate for ATT was very long-lived; had a horrible time trying to get DSL out of them a while back and it soured me on them so bad I stuck to dial-up for several years after. Comcast had poor picture quality on their analog service and refused to upgrade our older neighborhood.

So we recently dropped Comcast and got the ATT U-Verse three-way package of TV, phone, and internet, because it was cheaper than a Comcast bill plus the old fashioned phone service plus our dial-up access. I didn't get the fastest internet uverse offers, but it is fine for watching streaming video and ftp'ing files for my graphic artist spouse. Indeed, her art projects were the biggest driving factor, dial-up was just inadequate for the file sizes she was sending.

The service came with a rocking DVR that records 4 at once. I have to say no complaints this time, maybe they finally got their act together. Though the install took eight hours to run all new cat-5 thru the house because I refused to let them use the old rotten comcast coax anywhere.

I have two beefs about uverse.

1, I have easily a dozen sports channels in my package I never watch and don't want, but my middle-of-the road tier does NOT provide me the NASA TV channel, and that's plain wrong. NASATV if I am not mistaken is a free service of the government, but I have to pay extra to ATT to get it!?! I'll trade you all the sports channels for NASATV.

2, The ATT lobby got the Illinois legislature to pass a bill that lets them put Uverse in anywhere in any toem without being subject to having the must-carry municipal and local access channels cable franchisees like Comcast must carry. This I find quite infuriating because it costs ATT nothing to get those channels and put them on an SD subchannel, but they are not doing it. It makes me angry because we have a lot of public issues in my city that are covered by the Accesses channel shooting the meetings. It should be part of ATT's civic duty to carry that channel on all packages.


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Mike CohenRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 10, 2009 at 7:19:05 pm

For many years we had a fractional T1 - we paid for how much bandwidth we used. But during this time we were running our own website and several for clients out of our office. We also offered internet access to other tenants in the building.

Once we switched all sites to leased dedicated servers off-site, we switched to Cable. not sure of the actual bandwidth, but the uploading we do does not seem to be affected. And the downloads are not as frequent as the uploads.

We maintain an FTP server on our network, so uploads to the server are simply a network file transfer. Most files are graphics/Quark, InDesign stuff between us and our off-site workers, and the outside folks' connections are more of an issue. Of course if someone is up- or downloading big files it can freeze up our whole network, so we need to keep an eye on activity.

Useful tip: You can use the free Filezilla FTP server software to make any computer an FTP server.

The bandwidth is also fine for limited Skype use (my parents, incidentally, get giddy when they ring me on my laptop and can have brief face to face chats - just like Heywood Floyd wishing his daughter a happy birthday back on Earth.)

Internal server operations as others have mentioned are not affected by internet connection.

If you are uploading film or HD dailies on a..er..daily basis, then everything changes. Faster is better if time is an issue. But the subject line's "film prod company" likely does not mean an actual "film prod studio" but it simply a figure of speech.

Mike Cohen


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Rich RubaschRe: How Valuable is Fast Internet to a Film Prod Company?
by on Oct 11, 2009 at 12:56:04 am

Although we have a local office RAID as an FTP server, it is limited to our UPLOAD speed...in other words our fastest outgoing speed. When we had DSL it was impossibly slow if you were getting a large file remotely. It was great to copy the file to the RAID locally, sure, but clients commented on how slow it was.

We got Charter Cable with 10 meg down and 3 meg up and it's better, but somehow our web hosting service is still faster downloading a file remotely...which also means it takes us longer to get files up!

So be careful about local FTP servers if your upload speed is slow...it will be slow for your clients!

Speed rules and will continue to rule!

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production and Post
Owner/President/Editor/Designer/Animator


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