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Are you cold-calling for new clients?

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Milton Hockman
Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 8:14:13 pm

Many agree that Cold-Calling is the best way to gain new clients. They say it beats email, direct mail, etc.

Are you using this method to gain new clients? If so, how is it working for you and what's your pitch?



Owner
Plus More Media Group
Website Design - VA, Corporate Web Site Design - PlusMoreMedia.com
Marketing designs and videos that do more for your business!


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walter biscardi
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 8:19:55 pm

Nope.

100% referrals for us and of course answering questions here on the Cow.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author.
Credits include multiple Emmy, Telly, Aurora and Peabody Awards.
Owner, Biscardi Creative Media featuring HD Post

Biscardi Creative Media

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Patrick Ortman
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 10:15:54 pm

Exactly! Right on, Walt!

---------------------
http://www.patrickortman.com
Web and Video Design


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 8:20:32 pm

Yes, I cold call. It works far better for me than email.

But do I share my script? Not really.

The overall strategy I use I will share and that is that I try to learn as much as possible about the prospect before I call. I make the call about them and what I see as their need, not about how good at blah blah blah I may be.

Talking about them and what may be their need gets them talking, while trying to tell them I am the greatest thing since sliced bread -- which may impress my mom -- will likely set their eyes to rolling in their head and elicit a yawn.

That's what works for me.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry






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Mike Cohen
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 8:43:52 pm

Depends upon what we are selling. Our company does a combination of direct sales, work for hire and services combining many aspects of our services.

It's all about knowing who to contact. For product lines that are sold directly to a known customer, a surgeon for example, we may selectively contact these folks with an e-mail or phone call. It helps to have a relationship with someone already, or alternatively a relationship with someone the lead knows. This gets back to the many conversations about networking - not just social networking, which is a 21st century word for what people in business have always done.

Lately we have been using e-mail marketing to promote events and products. We use an established list of past and current customers. In our latest effort, at least 50 people out of 1500 recipients clicked a link to the offering, and at least 11 people actually made a conversion, that is, a purchase. And we are happy with that result, based upon what we are selling. But we also sent out a mailing via snail mail to the same group of people, so repetition is as important as how you contact someone.

Mike Cohen


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Mark Suszko
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 9:31:59 pm

See, Ron, what I would describe what you are doing is not exactly cold calling, maybe "warmed-up" calling:-) You're doing research and surveying first, as you gauge if there is an actual opportunity with the subject.

When I hear "cold calling" I think of people in a boiler room who have no idea who I am or waht I do, getting my name wrong and my organization name wrong, and hitting me with a generic script that insults my intelligence. I hang up on that call instantly.

Now if I was to get a call actually surveying me about something, honestly, I *might* give them thirty seconds or so. And another thirty if they aer going along well. But I HATE people trying to sell me anything over the phone. Especially when I didn't ask for the sales call. Maybe that's the issue with permission marketing: I don't give out the permission willy-nilly.

I had this one bozo from some graphics company, would call me without fail every two months, asking me if I was interested in some generic clip art stuff. Well, I was, at that time, enough to ask him to send a sample, one time. But after seeing the samples and the rate cards and going over our budget, it wasn't going to work out, and the next follow-up he made, I told him so.

And the next time.

And the NEXT frigging time.

He called *just* infrequently enough that I would have practically forgotten him and so I would just give him a polite brush-off, but he never took the hint. Finally, he caught me on a particularly bad and hectic day, and I just gave him both barrels, an R. Lee Ermy type dressing-down (but without cuss words) about three unbroken minutes long. That's what it took to get him to stop.

I hate cold calling, I've been on either side of it.



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Ed Cilley
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 9:49:01 pm

Milton,

Gaining new clients is always a challenge. Cold calls has a negative connotation as noted earlier in the thread. Most of us will do some investigation about a company and find out if they have any need, or even a slight possibility of need, for our services. When I started freelance editing, unbooked days were spent cold calling. I would call companies in the area that seemed likely candidates. But to be honest, not much ever came from those calls. Almost all the work came by referral.

The old clique - It's who you know, is very true.

Typically, one call is not going to land a job. You will need to call several times before getting your foot in the door. Just don't be like the guy Mike talked about - know when to stop calling.

Ed

_________________________________________________
Anything worth doing at all, is worth doing well.
- Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 4, 2009 at 9:54:39 pm

There is not ONE OUNCE of what you said that I would disagree with, Mark. You are spot-on, as always.

When I call someone "out of the blue" with an idea that I have based on some preliminary research that I have done on their company, I always ask first if I have caught them at a bad time and I tell them that I would like to discuss an idea that I have regarding a need that I think I see in your company for...insert the idea here.

If I am right and I have done my research correctly, they nearly always say that they have a few minutes.

If I am wrong, then they get defensive and I know that I needn't call them back -- ever. ;o)

While I DO cold call, I never call without what I believe to be a "well loaded gun" of true value based on what I see in their company.

Again, the call should be about them -- never you. If it gets that way, you have almost always lost the battle.

Sure, I sell myself, but I always veil it with the concepts and structures of what I see as their story, amplified.

Calling someone to slam them for graphics services and clip art is a great example of exactly what NOT to do in a call, in my experience and opinion.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry






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Mark Alexander
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 4:10:43 am

Can you offer some specific information that you would be looking for, and how, that would help you determine what a company's video needs are?



Mark


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 10:12:08 am

Mark,

I never go into my research with a pre-conceived idea based on what I do and what I can bring to them. Each case is ABSOLUTELY unique to me and therefore I do not start with any preconceptions whatsoever. If I want to work with a company, I will watch them for a bit and see what kinds of things I notice. Then, based on that, I will dig deeper. Based on what I am learning about them, that tells me what I should be talking to them about.

Often, I have no idea what specific product I will pitch; I am looking for a "mental hinge," a connection point where we discuss a need that clicks with them. As we chat about it, I will throw out everything from comprehensive multi-pronged attacks to very focused things that they may bite on. That way, we are killing two birds with one stone -- I am getting to "soft pitch" them, while softly feeling out what kinds of budgets they may have.

The important thing that I remember is that I am in the Communication business, not the video business. Video is just ONE of the things that I do. My real business is to be a communicator and that may sometimes be best served by the web, by print, by video -- or maybe a combination of two or more of them.

My goal is to serve the need of the client and in doing so, collect a check. My goal is not to sell video.

Others may disagree and have other strategies.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry






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Michael Hancock
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 1:00:47 pm

[Ron Lindeboom] "The important thing that I remember is that I am in the Communication business, not the video business. Video is just ONE of the things that I do. My real business is to be a communicator and that may sometimes be best served by the web, by print, by video -- or maybe a combination of two or more of them. My goal is to serve the need of the client and in doing so, collect a check. My goal is not to sell video."


This is the best advice I've ever read on the Cow, and I've read a ton of great advice.

Clients never need just "a video". They need a way to communicate their message. Now if a video is the best way to do that than it's the route you take, but producing a video for the sake of producing a video to get a paycheck will end up being the last video you make for someone. If it doesn't effectively communicate a message that drives predetermined results (direct sales, name recognition, sales leads, etc...), it's just wasted dollars.

I think too many times we get caught up in the hype of new gear, awesome effects, and crazy flashy flying graphics and forget that it all means nothing if it doesn't tell your message effectively.

The best spots I've ever done consisted of 1 graphic that fades on at the end and straight cuts throughout. Usually no more than 3 or 4 cuts in a full 30 second spot, but the message is crystal clear and effective. Sales for the client are through the roof. They're not the most glamorous spots we've done and definitely not the most difficult to produce but they work. And that's all that matters in the end.

Michael.

-------------------------------
I'll be working late.


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Steve Kownacki
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 1:29:43 pm

My goal is never to sell but to educate. And just like applying for a job, doing your homework and speaking intelligently to a prospect about their business is critical. I don't sell videos, we provide solutions. You must first identify what a client's need is and then seek a solution and it may not be video. There's been numerous times after a call that a client needs print or web and I introduce them to a partner at a lunch - keeping me in the loop. This builds trust. What happened in the last case was that while my initial prospect didn't need me directly, his friend did; so we got a job with a new client but not the original one I was courting. Nifty.

While getting new clients is nice, maintaining current clients is far more profitable. There's a huge cost to gaining business. Keep your customers happy.

Part of my mission statement - you have one of those, right? - is "...to make you the hero in your organization." What triggers that prospect? A raise? A promotion? A bonus? A pat on the back? But what will get them that? Increased sales, reduced downtime in training, fewer callbacks on services? What can you provide to them that will help them achieve that goal. You have to be able to identify what triggers them and fix the problem they have.

So in response to your question, am I cold calling, no. For me it's all about my current client base:ask for referrals, keep in touch with newsletters (only names I get personally), call and say hello, send cards, recognize their achievements. Meaning, when I see them in a publication I'll call and let them know, even cut it out and send it. This is LOTS of work. Probably why I'm still at 70+ hours and writing this on a weekend.

Steve


Jump to the FFP Website



View Steve Kownacki's profile on LinkedIn





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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 4:29:27 pm

[Steve Kownacki] "While getting new clients is nice, maintaining current clients is far more profitable. There's a huge cost to gaining business. Keep your customers happy."


This is a great point, Steve.

I once knew one of the board of directors of JCPenny Co. and used to talk with him regularly. He had all duaghters and no sons and the way I loved business, I sort of became his surrogate son. He taught me tons of great things over the years.

One of the greatest was that he told me that JCPCo had done a study in which they found that it takes SIX TIMES the amount of time, money and effort to woo and land a new customer, than it does to keep an existing one and get them to buy another product or service from you.

SIX TIMES.

That is an incredible bit of knowledge which every business owner or manager should tattoo onto the inside of their eyelids so that they don't forget.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry






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David Roth Weiss
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 3:53:05 pm

[Michael Hancock] "Clients never need just "a video". They need a way to communicate their message. Now if a video is the best way to do that than it's the route you take, but producing a video for the sake of producing a video to get a paycheck will end up being the last video you make for someone. If it doesn't effectively communicate a message that drives predetermined results (direct sales, name recognition, sales leads, etc...), it's just wasted dollars. "

Michael,

Keep in mind that Ron can offer a certifiable and quantifiable audience to the potential new customers that he cold calls. We can't do that in the video business.

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 4:49:58 pm

David,

I can't do that when it comes to record business, video business, animation, magazines that I launched against the tide and against "expert commentary" as to the insanity of such a thing today, etc., etc., etc.

I am ALWAYS swimming against the tide in case you didn't notice.

I have ALWAYS overcome the obstacles no matter if it's that I want to make music videos for companies in England -- when I live in California -- or sell a website that the manufacturers know that they are getting the advantage of, for free.

I don't know if you quite remember the old saying of: Why buy the COW, when you can get the milk for free -- but there have been PLENTY of times when I have been up against the wall and have gotten the firing squad to turn the guns back on themselves by a well supported and convincing argument.

I wish it was as easy as you think it is -- that by waving a flag of raw numbers, the people line up and pull out their wallets. But that is simply so simplistic and myopic that it is inherently untrue. Though I wish it were true, as I would then have a smooth road in front of me -- not to mention a lot less work to do.

What you see as the COW, did NOT come from a bunch of companies volunteering to support it, for the most part. For every one that did, there were a dozen that fought tooth and nail to not be here. (Oh, and most of those that did sign on were NOT swayed by numbers. Few people are. In fact, most of them wondered if the numbers were true as they were so much bigger than everyone else's numbers, and some outright called us liars because they couldn't believe that we were bigger than all of our competitors, combined.)

It has NOT been an easy road to be bovinian.

I do the same thing when it comes to magazines that people say that there are enough of, record companies that people say are a thing of the past, training companies that are dying on the vine, and so on and so forth.

Some people look at the donut and all they see is the hole and what is missing. Me? I look at all them greasy, sugary, deep-fried calories and all that blood thickening goodness that is there...just sitting round the hole.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry






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David Roth Weiss
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 5:06:52 pm

[Ron Lindeboom] "I wish it was as easy as you think it is -- that by waving a flag of raw numbers, the people line up and pull out their wallets."

Ron,

I never said that your job was easy. However, the fact that you have built a well-known entity that is certifiable and quantifiable does make cold calling somewhat easier.

Of course we both know that your job really starts when customer says "no." And, I'll bet that's where you really shine...

David Roth Weiss
Director/Editor
David Weiss Productions, Inc.
Los Angeles

POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™


A forum host of Creative COW's Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, Indie Film & Documentary, and Film History & Appreciations forums.


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 5:32:02 pm

[David Roth Weiss] "I never said that your job was easy. However, the fact that you have built a well-known entity that is certifiable and quantifiable does make cold calling somewhat easier."

Yes, it has made it easier but I was the same dogged and relentless refuses-to-accept-contrary-conclusions kind of sales animal that can be this way because I know I care about my customers and I will prove that my work flies, or they can have their money back. When you have that kind of confidence, it shows and is quite regularly contagious -- sorta like a cold for businesspeople.

In the end, the important thing is what I said about donuts: some see the hole. Me? I try hard to see the whole.

Oh, and David, I do video, audio, and many other kinds of projects. I just don't put up my work anymore as Tim Wilson would tell you that even in the beginning many years ago, my critics tore me to shreds online trying to discredit me. As Tim mentions somewhere in one of his recent posts: some people never forgive you for being right. They don't. Some of the "old guard" that used to be some of the big names many years ago, refuse to play here and whine and chide the COW for its commercialism -- yet, they won't offer a single thing for free and expect to get paid every time they open their mouths. Hypocrites. They deride me for moderating but they themselves have publicly lied and vilified people -- and unlike me, who does apologize when I get out of line -- I have yet to see them do so. (Even when they tarred and feathered a guy up in Toronto whose only crime was that he didn't understand a process which he was mental blocking on and asked for repeated clarification.)

I am too busy making stuff, building things, to bother with my critics any longer. I don't have to make demo reels anymore. I used to. Now, I just show them some of my completed projects and they get the idea.

When you set out to build something, many people cheer you on until it starts succeeding, and then they won't forgive you for your success.

Ah, human nature.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom

Creativity is a type of learning process where the teacher and pupil are located in the same individual.

Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
- Antoine de Saint Exupéry






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Tim Wilson
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 7:25:12 pm

[Ron Lindeboom] "Yes, it has made it easier but I was the same dogged and relentless refuses-to-accept-contrary-conclusions kind of sales animal...."

Malcolm Gladwell, the author of "Blink," observed that people only remember how the David. vs. Goliath story ends, but forget the two steps that led to that. The first is that David tried on the traditional helmet and armor, but couldn't even walk in it. There was no point in trying to dress like a soldier. Second, there was no point trying to act like one either. Instead, he ran straight at Goliath.

“The sudden astonishment when David sprints forward must have frozen Goliath, making him a better target,” the poet and critic Robert Pinsky writes in “The Life of David.” ...David pressed. That’s what Davids do when they want to beat Goliaths.

The point being that, while the Cow has a lot of traffic, it's still a very small company, certainly relative to its advertisers, and certainly smaller than the parent companies of our competitors.

For people who know us, the Cow's success is an impediment to potential advertisers. As Ron points out, they already benefit, so getting them to pay is tough. And for people who don't know us, ours can be a hard story to tell.

To mash up Ron's posts with a couple from Mike's listening thread...
  • Research potential targets. Start with their websites and brochures.
  • Listen to what they say their strengths are, which will also tell you their weaknesses. (Hint: they are identical.)
  • Find stories of their success to learn what their needs are. (Hint: they are identical.)
  • Speak the way they do about what's important to them. Sell what they want to buy.


You'll also find that once you get into that mindset, you can optimize your time and effort. You'll more easily and accurately place jobs on the graph whose axes are "jobs I'd want" and "jobs I can succeed at." Zero in where the lines cross.



[Ron Lindeboom]Some people look at the donut and all they see is the hole and what is missing. Me? I look at all them greasy, sugary, deep-fried calories and all that blood thickening goodness that is there...just sitting round the hole.


Mmmmm....donuts...

Here is very nearly the only thing to justify flying through LAX....


randysdonuts.com


Gratuitous, but hey, we're talking about donuts...

Soccer Donut Stunt






Tim Wilson
Creative Cow Magazine!

My Blog: "Is this thing on? Oh it's on!"

Don't forget to rate your favorite posts!


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Ron Lindeboom
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 8:54:48 pm

[Tim Wilson] "For people who know us, the Cow's success is an impediment to potential advertisers. As Ron points out, they already benefit, so getting them to pay is tough. And for people who don't know us, ours can be a hard story to tell."

Selling for the COW, if that is what DRW was alluding to and I am reading him correctly, has been the TOUGHEST set of closes that I have ever had to master.

Instead of being easy, as Tim points out, our numbers are an impediment to the majority of potential advertisers, as they seem almost comical when comparing how a small independent site can eclipse the combined footprint of every major trade publisher combined.

It is NOT a story that plays well...commercially.

BUT...

If we didn't use it, we'd be right back where we started from, wherein there would be no need to buy the COW when they are enjoying the benefits of the growth seen from the milk served here.

We have to use some pretty hefty closes here and it's given me a viewpoint on marketing/sales that has given me a whole new set of tools from which to draw upon.

Therein is the secret: as Tim points out, flexibility is its own advantage. There is no single answer, there are only answers -- and the more of them that you can use and master, the better.

Ron Lindeboom


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Michael Hancock
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 7:17:19 pm

[David Roth Weiss] "Michael,

Keep in mind that Ron can offer a certifiable and quantifiable audience to the potential new customers that he cold calls. We can't do that in the video business."


I actually never considered that Ron could use the COW as a quantifiable audience. This is a niche website (although that niche is obviously growing). If he's cold calling a corporation that makes wood flooring, they don't care about the COW. They care about selling their flooring, and that's where the importance of focusing on the message and not the medium comes into play.

What I liked most about Ron's post was that this is a communication business, whether you're doing video, print, web, podcasting, etc... It's all about the message, and that message either works or it doesn't. Now if he was doing a project for AJA or Apple or Avid or Adobe, the COW would be a huge asset to point to and say, "I have X number of people who use your products and go to my site. I can deliver them to you". But outside of video/audio/graphic production the COW probably doesn't apply when cold calling.

As far as offering a quantifiable audience--I work for an ad agency with in-house production, not a production only house, so we can offer an audience that's quantifiable. We can target via print, broadcast, cable systems, satellite, web, etc... But if we don't deliver the right message the audience won't buy. That's something we consider when we cold call--where are they advertising now, and are there better ways to spend their money to increase when their ads are seen, who sees them, and how often.

If the client is buying directly from the media outlets it gives us a huge leg up on a cold call as we can make their jobs easier. Instead of the marketing person dealing with multiple reps and having to determine where to buy and when, they give us a budget and tell us to maximize it. We do the legwork, negotiate often lower rates than they could get on their own, and if they have a problem with media they contact us and we take care of it. That alone can get our foot in the door and land a face to face meeting. That said, I despise cold calling. All the respect in the world to those who do it and do it well.

Michael

-------------------------------
I'll be working late.


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Mark Alexander
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 5, 2009 at 5:55:56 pm

I want to get some info about regional manufacturing companies so I've gone to the "Reference USA" website and started looking through their massive database. After filtering for sales and number of employees and other variables I came up with a handful of companies that might be worth looking deeper into.

One problem I'm seeing though is that some of the info may be a bit outdated and not entirely accurate. For example, after I got tired of looking into "widget making" companies I took a break and thought I'd check out some local video production companies and saw a wedding video biz that showed annual sales of $3 million! Wow, and this was a single person operation! That's some seriously upscale weddings!!!

Have you used this type of reference database before? Was it helpful? Any suggestions on how to best utilize this data in "researching" a company (in spite of somewhat exaggerated sales figures!)?

Mark


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Patricia Shanks
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 6, 2009 at 6:05:01 pm

Not cold-calling, here. I'm not allergic to the notion. But I do feel like I wear a scarlet "T" for talent, at times. I think there's a lingering belief, or feeling, that talent doesn't necessarily have technical, well, 'talent'. (I may resemble that remark to a certain degree.) Maybe that's only my perception because of what I've seen at meetings and mixers where everyone else is on the other side of the room. (As long as I have the side with the hors d'ouevres, I'm good.)

I send postcards. I only count on 1% of them hitting the mark. And the job might be down the road a year. A couple of times, my postcards scored work for other people. It's all good. The task is to train the other people to remember me when their postcard advertising storage solutions reaches a client who needs a female voice talent or a writer.

Patricia Shanks
Patricia Shanks Voice Studio
http://www.studioshanks.biz


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Mark Alexander
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 7, 2009 at 3:17:28 pm

Patricia,

As someone who has been to the same MCAI meetings as you and Travis I'll agree that there is some truth in the talent vs. technical sides of the room (although it's the techies who crowd the food table!). But, when it comes to "business", you voice-over types have a lot of good insight! I bug Travis every time I see him to try and glean a little marketing insight.

You do a lot of "networking" it seems. How is it going for you in that regard? Do you get a lot of work/connections/referrals from going to different functions and just being "seen"?

Mark


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Patricia Shanks
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Sep 7, 2009 at 6:07:41 pm

Hey, Mark! I don't think that just being seen is enough. I think it's another one of those Catch 22 scenarios. I think you have to be seen "doing." And I think we need to run a clever balance between being seen when we're not busy and being seen when we're busy. There are always those people at meetings who never seem to be doing anything, or anything worthy, bless their wicked hearts. But we all instantly ID them as people who are looking for work. Besides, I'd rather be standing on the hors d'oeuvres side of the room all by myself, wearing a knowing grin and accompanied only by an air of mystery. OTOH, being everywhere a lot is important. You know. Something is going to stick to the wall.

Patricia Shanks
Patricia Shanks Voice Studio
http://www.studioshanks.biz


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Joe Kaczorowski
Re: Are you cold-calling for new clients?
on Jul 20, 2010 at 11:07:04 pm

I just came across this thread, about a year late... but I'm wondering if anyone can offer insight to how you, after determining their need, convey that too them without sounding like you're putting them down. You obviously don't want to come across as telling them you're better at "X" than them, but at the same time you do because then they will pay you to do "X". Thoughts?


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