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Will they work for free!

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Roy SchneiderWill they work for free!
by on Mar 2, 2009 at 8:53:15 pm

I was doing some research when I came across this article about a new social music video web site.

http://mashable.com/2009/02/19/99-dollar-music-videos/?goback=%2Ehom

After reading the terms of use, the artist and director give non-exclusive rights of this content to be reproduced in anyway the website wants.

I remember being young and wanting a break. I remember being willing to work for free to get experience, but this seems like a lot to give away for $99.00.

The sites concept is interesting, and I am looking forward to hearing some other opinions.

Roy

Roy Schneider
Long Live Da Cow!


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Mark SuszkoRe: Will they work for free!
by on Mar 2, 2009 at 10:03:18 pm

In an area like music, where copying and piracy are trivial to do, and old business models just plain don't work any more, it seems like the only way to beat that is to try something new.

And what has been tried for a while now in music is to fight the losses from pirating by making it up on volume, and by pricing in the realm of 'micropayments'. This is I think why iTunes worked and other similar systems failed: any song, just 99 cents, period. A full CD, by comparison, with 2-3 songs you want and five you don't, was stuck in the $20-$25 range way past the time it cost a lot to make the CD.

At 99 cents each, for only what you actually want, a song is an easy impulse buy on iTunes, easier even than in our youth, when we'd spend $5 on a 2-sided 45 record or EP with only one good song on it. Considering they remove the need for you to do any "work" involved with pirating or torrenting, it's STILL a pretty lucrative model.

Modern bands don't try to make their money off album sales anymore: the albums are more or less given away, sometimes literally, to build an audience that will evangelize for the band and help market it, creating demand. The band then makes the money off of live tours and selling merchandise like shirts and etc. This is 180 degrees out from the last fifty years of how the record business worked.

But it seems to be working, at least for some bands.

I expect some variation of this model is going to be applied to videos. The immediate easy thing I see is, giving away DVD's for a token amount, and paying for them with sponsorships and advertising on the disks, which only works better for the advertiser the more the disk is copied and shared around. By pricing the original so low a pirate can't afford to waste time cracking and duping it to re-sell for less, you defeat piracy as well, without any technical means needed. But you need to build your profits into the initial burst of prodcution, then basically write it off no matter how long the product remains out there and popular. Taht's hard for some people to take, basically, like having residuals but only for the first three repeats, on something like I Love Lucy or The Honeymooners or M*A*S*H.

If you're loking for other positives in this model, it certainly encourages much more actual production volume, just smaller margins on the individual products.


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Mick HaenslerRe: Will they work for free!
by on Mar 3, 2009 at 1:27:07 pm

[Mark Suszko] "Modern bands don't try to make their money off album sales anymore: the albums are more or less given away, "

This might be somewhat true for a handful of major acts, but for 99.9% of touring bands, it's the exact opposite. Most bands nowadays have to come to the table of a record deal with a proven product that has sold "at retail price" upwards of 10,000 units. Granted retail price is subjective, but most bands I know including my own are selling CD's for $10-15. Since venues pay less and less these days, bands need to charge a decent amount for product to make any money at all.



Mick Haensler
Higher Ground Media


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Franklin McMahonRe: Will they work for free!
by on Mar 2, 2009 at 10:53:40 pm


One note about rights..just about any major site where you upload content, especially video, has the same setup..once you upload, the website has the rights to repurpose or do what it wants..even though you still retain the copyright. Sites almost have to do this these days to cover themselves for the future. I'll check out the link..looks interesting...

Frank

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Ron LindeboomRe: Will they work for free!
by on Jul 5, 2009 at 3:12:42 pm

[Franklin McMahon] "...just about any major site where you upload content, especially video, has the same setup..once you upload, the website has the rights to repurpose or do what it wants..even though you still retain the copyright."

I bumped into this thread just this morning and when I read this, I wanted to make clear that the Creative COW reels section -- for those bumping into this thread later -- does not demand rights to do whatever it wants with your video. All we want is to host it and you can turn it off anytime you wish.

Oh, and in response to this thread, most music publishers are money- and dream-stealing bastards who are the worst kind of parasite. I have friends whose records have been in continuous worldwide release for decades now and can be bought anywhere. (I am talking major label groups that still enjoy substantial worldwide followings.) When we talked about it, most tell me that they make next to nothing. One told me that even though he is a songwriter and has the obligatory songwriter's royalty coming to him, he gets a check once a year or so and it is enough to take him and his sons to McDonalds. What a joke. Talk about "cooking the books." The record companies recouped their monies invested long ago and yet their accountants still assess "development" and "marketing" costs to these bands all these years later. (Wow, "developing" bands that are long gone and that never get an ounce of marketing, eh?)

I am not a huge Prince fan but I love it when he says that the record companies are ten-times the pirates that kids are, any day.

The greatest thing that ever happened to young musicians was the internet. As time goes on and the market redefines itself, only Britney Spears and the endless parade of soundalike clones -- can anybody really tell the difference when they hear all of these 'soundalike chicks' they roll out one after another? -- will care one twit about the record company conglomerate/ClearChannel hegemony.

I can just see Britney, Christina, etc., on their own geezer/nostalgia tours in the future. It ain't gonna be pretty, not when the make-up meant much more then the music. Now these girls should have been the ones classified as "industrial rock." ;o)

Thanks for letting me get that off my chest. ;o)

A rather opinionated and still rockin',

Ron Lindeboom


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