BUSINESS AND MARKETING: Business and Marketing Forum Business and Marketing Articles

Rate for Compressing Video for Web

COW Forums : Business & Marketing

<< PREVIOUS   •   FAQ   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Tim TschudinRate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 11, 2008 at 4:48:29 pm

What would be a fare rate if someone wanted a 30 sec spot compressed for their website. Should I charge by hour or flat rate per spot?

Tim
Fence Post Creative


Return to posts index

Greg BallRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 11, 2008 at 6:33:59 pm

I normally charge a flat rate especially if it's NOT something they need immediately. Otherwise they pay my hourly editing rate.


Return to posts index

Ryan HamiltonRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 2:49:37 am

Greg said,

I normally charge a flat rate especially if it's NOT something they need immediately. Otherwise they pay my hourly editing rate.

The questioned asked was how much should he charge. This again is like all the other posts on rates. People comment but never actually share what their rates are. Are you all scared to say what it is you charge? It not like rates are the secret recipe for coca-cola. Sharing them among peers and your competition should be a good thing. If more designers, videographers, photographers shared their rates and established a true industry level cost for certain areas then clients make their choice based on quality and style. It should be if your level of work isn't good enough to compete with the industry you don't make it. Not the other way around.



Return to posts index


Steve WargoRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 6:42:21 am

Some people like to keep their rates a bit of a secret. So, all you have to do is call em and ask what their rates are. I don't quite get it. But, I think what Greg was saying is to charge whatever your rate is, whether that's $20 an hour or $200 per hour.

For a 30 second spot, I would charge $ 50, same as if I was laying it to a BetaSP. They pay it or move on. No deals. We compress it and upload it to our server and send an e-mail to the recipient with a url and a password. So easy, even a caveman could do it.

Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona
It's a dry heat!

Sony HDCAM F-900 & HDW-2000/1 deck
5 Final Cut (not quite PRO) systems
Sony HVR-M25 HDV deck
2-Sony EX-1 HD .


Return to posts index

Zane BarkerRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 6:44:21 am

Chill out Ryan,

There are a LOT of factors that go into what you are charging. And one of those factors is LOCATION. Some one in L.A. or new your is going to be charging quite differently then someone in Bosie ID or Topeka KS.

As for my thoughts on the question. Some of it also depends on if I was the one who was hired to do the original production and edit. If I was then I would most likely do it for free. Also if it is a client that you do work for often then just do it.

To compress a 30 Sec spot for the web only takes minutes.

Now if it is just a complete stranger off the street, then sure charge him. And I would say that charging 1/4 to 1/2 your regular hourly rate should be fine. If this person os going to be coming to you often with 30 sec spots that need to be compressed , then you could work out a better deal.

The price of a nice lunch sounds good.

And yes Ryan the price of a nice lunch is going to be different in New York then in Topeka KS.

Don't let technology get in the way of your creativity!


Return to posts index

Ron LindeboomRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 2:39:08 pm

[Ryan Hamilton] "Sharing them among peers and your competition should be a good thing."

There is NO WAY that I am going to tell my competition what I charge. I will tell them LOTS of things. I will share all kinds of information and things that can help them. But my pricing structure? Never. Nope. Nine. Nada.

Why?

I arrived at it through all the steps that many here have outlined. Steps that involve analyzing your business, your market, your real costs and on and on...

Will I and many here help people analyze these things and come to their own conclusion? Yes. But will I hand someone a magic window that gives them a breakout of what each type of work costs in my business? Nope.

If that offends you, which it seems it does based on some of your comments around here, then you need to understand that there are many many years of business represented across the pictures that host this forum and each of them gives a LOT of free advice. They learned long ago that there are no magic answers for rates, policies, etc. You have to review your own circumstances and abilities -- along with the kind of customers you attract. You charge $50 an hour for motion graphics work. Me, I wouldn't open After Effects for $50 an hour and my customers wouldn't want me to. They wouldn't take me serious if I did. But that's because I don't make it the #1 part of my business. It's just another service I offer. If I were doing After Effects work all the time, then $50 an hour MIGHT make sense, just so I could keep my job log more full. (But I doubt I really would under my present situation, though based on circumstances, your mileage may vary.)

That's the point: prices change with circumstance, situation, overhead, customers, etc., etc. -- and that is why only someone starting out in business throws out rates like there is nothing to it. It's actually quite amateurish, really.

BTW: If you EVER make another post around here in which you treat someone with the same kind of discourtesy that you treated Paul Del Vecchio when "critiquing" his website, with all the personal insults and whatnot, I will show you the door in an instant. Capeesh?

Have a nice day,

Best regards,


Ron Lindeboom
http://www.linkedin.com/in/ronlindeboom
Publisher, Creative COW Magazine
Join the COW's LinkedIn Group

Now in the COW Magazine: Commercials. A look at the history, strategy, techniques and production workflows of successful commercials. All brought to you by some of the COW's brightest members. Accept no substitutes!

Would you like to be in Creative COW Magazine with your story or contributi...

Do you have your complimentary subscription to Creative COW Magazine yet?



Return to posts index


Ryan HamiltonRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 11:04:48 pm

Ron,
So are you implying that $50/hr for AE is to low? or to high? I'm curious to know for your location at what rate your clients would take you seriously.
Secondly I meant no disrespect to Paul. I was being completely honest and not affraid to do so.
When asking for a critique I'd expect the best and the worst. It's only the worst that drives me onwards and actually improves my work. And people who lie and say things are great and aren't completely honest I feel are doing me a complete disservice. Capeesh?



Return to posts index

Ron LindeboomRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 11:28:10 pm

Most of what you said was actually quite good feedback, Ryan. But you can be honest with people without all the "extras." Honesty doesn't have to cross the line into denigrating a person with comments like...
"Your reel seems like some second rate attempt at being some blockbuster fantasy adventure trailer. Had you had the low voice over explaining your stuff I would have fell out my chair pissing my self. Shorter reels with A+ only top notch bits of your work are stronger than longer ones. somethings may be good, but as soon as I see something half ass I think your skill level is not as good anymore. Potential clients will see this as well. Some serious criticism here, and with the other posts as well, that you need to suck up and accept."
...are simply over the top. Maybe you think they're not but around the COW, we really strive for honest feedback without all the "cold water face slapping" that some seem to take joy in. If you like it, trust me, I will make you a regular recipient of it whenever I disagree with you.

Nearly all of my business is done outside my area. I have only a couple of local accounts. To me, $50 an hour for AE work is below my rate. I wouldn't work for that. That's me, your mileage may vary.

Best regards,


Ron Lindeboom
http://www.linkedin.com/in/ronlindeboom
Publisher, Creative COW Magazine
Join the COW's LinkedIn Group

Now in the COW Magazine: Commercials. A look at the history, strategy, techniques and production workflows of successful commercials. All brought to you by some of the COW's brightest members. Accept no substitutes!

Would you like to be in Creative COW Magazine with your story or contributi...

Do you have your complimentary subscription to Creative COW Magazine yet?



Return to posts index

Steve WargoRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 4:00:34 pm

Ryan

A long time ago, being sort of new and having a very cool office, I kept a lot of tapes in a shelf unit, in the office, with clients names printed boldly on the labels for everyone to see. Sort of a "Look who I've got for a client" kind of attitude.

A "friend" of mine used to visit my office once a month or so just to kind of pick my brain and we'd exchange ideas.

I started losing those brag clients, one by one. Hmmmmm. I started to ask around and discovered that my "friend" had several of my big accounts. It turns out that he knew my rates and knew who my clients were and he went to them with a "better offer" and some of them were stupid enough to take it. Two of them were PetSmart and Blue Cross - Blue Shield. His quality and experience were far less than mine but he had a better price.

All but one of those clients came back.

I keep my rates to myself.



Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona
It's a dry heat!

Sony HDCAM F-900 & HDW-2000/1 deck
5 Final Cut (not quite PRO) systems
Sony HVR-M25 HDV deck
2-Sony EX-1 HD .


Return to posts index


David BraswellRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 19, 2008 at 10:13:02 pm

I realize I'm late to this thread but I felt compelled to respond to this.

I'm also on a large, international web design list. That list absolutely forbids discussions of specific rates. The idea that peers and competitors should discuss rates and establish "a true industry level cost for certain areas" is generally frowned upon by the government, who have been known to prosecute those practices as price-fixing/gouging. I'm not a lawyer and please don't think I'm accusing anyone of any shady dealings. But I see discussions of this nature all the time in the COW threads, and thought it worth mentioning since sometimes the appearance of impropriety is as damning as actual misconduct.

FWIW, weekend warriors and the uncle Fred's of the world do make it dreadfully tough to get paid sometimes. But arriving at equitable rates that provide for you and your family and maintaining competitiveness takes a lot more backend work than knowing what everyone else is charging.

Peace



Return to posts index

Tim TschudinRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 2:49:20 pm

Thanks everyone and sorry I didn't mean to stir up a hornets nest. And thank you Steve, I think I will bill it just like making a dub.

Tim
Fence Post Creative


Return to posts index

Steve WargoRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 3:46:30 pm

Well Tim, we're just replacing one task with another and I don't believe in charging less money as time goes on.



Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona
It's a dry heat!

Sony HDCAM F-900 & HDW-2000/1 deck
5 Final Cut (not quite PRO) systems
Sony HVR-M25 HDV deck
2-Sony EX-1 HD .


Return to posts index


Mike CohenRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 12, 2008 at 3:58:15 pm

depends upon your business model. If you make your income from piecemeal work, then you have a rate for that. If you make your living from project prices, ie, $XYZ for finished product, then compression and mastering may be part of the package price, and a client who is paying for a project from soup to nuts probably doesn't care about individual costs. Some do and want an itemized list - which may have more to do with internal budgeting procedures.

Mike


Return to posts index

Mike HealeyRe: Rate for Compressing Video for Web
by on Mar 13, 2008 at 3:51:49 am

Tim, My two cents worth b/c I've been in your shoes in the past and found myself asking the same questions...

Keep in mind, my core business is :30 broadcast spots so your situation may be different.

My clients don't want to walk out with a DVD/VHS any longer. Out of town clients (the bulk of my business) don't want to wait next day for a FedEx proof either. So, they get an MPEG-1 straight off the timeline. Many agencies and clients walk in with a USB thumb drive and leave with their spot on their keychain. They go back to their office and e-mail the client or customer and await instant feedback. That type of turn around comes with a price tag.

For starters, the client/customer didn't have the pass thru overnight charge of (fill in the blank) or have to wait for the proof to arrive the next day or perhaps two. Agency types don't find themselves running around the city trying to get spots approved. Again, what's that worth to the agency and client when you're fighting deadlines?

I'm in a small market but provide turn-key service for clients and customers in some major markets. I don't base my rates and fees on my market but rather what the service is actually worth based on an average across the board. What may seem expensive for clients in some markets is cheap for others. I've found a happy medium that many can live with.

If you charge $30-$50 for a single :30 broadcast spot to BetaSP there's no reason why you can't get the same for an MPEG or WMV file encoded and delivered via e-mail or saved to a thumb drive. I actually charge $5 for every spot we send out via e-mail or upload to an FTP site. This also includes radio MP3's that get sent out to several radio stations. Some may say that's nickel and dimming clients BUT I have to sit down and type and e-mail and communicate with the recipient. My time is valuable so I bill for it. Not to mention I (we) now have an archived version of the spot we can pull up in seconds if there's ever a question. If the client ever has an issue or question about the spot I don't have to go to the shelf, pull up the master and find the spot. I (or they) just click on the proofs directory on the computer and viola!

Almost every agency I deal with charges delivery fees for proofs regardless if it's printed or e-mailed so I felt I should, too. If I go back and filter "e-mail delivery" of spots you'll see several hundred dollars in revenue each year. It all adds up.

Again, your situation is probably different from mine. If you're dealing primarily with corporate videos, sales pitches, etc. you're looking at a time consuming process. In that case, I charge my hourly rate b/c it's going to tie up the edit suite while the web file is encoded/exported. I may be able to make phone calls and return e-mails or run errands in the meantime but that's good for me. I'm generating revenue during non revenue generating behaviors. I try to find a way to bill for all my time if possible and continue to work smarter, not harder.

Bottom line... don't make the mistake and give your services and time away for free. Clients will have more respect for you if you charge for it and attach a value to your product. You may have certain clients and situations where you give a freebie now and then based on budget, history, return business, etc. but you and only you can make that call.

Hope this helps.

Cheers!

~Mike~


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]