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Question about starting a post-production biz...

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fernloth
Question about starting a post-production biz...
on Jun 10, 2007 at 6:24:10 pm

I'm interested in starting a sideline small-scale post production business to do some moonlighting work away from my main line of work. I'm hoping some of you here who might operate similar set-ups might give me some advice or sources I might access for further information. Some of the questions I would have would be:

What would be the essential start-up equipment...obviously an editing system, but camera? With HD on the way, what would be an affordable, reliable solution for aquisition and delivery?

In terms of muscle and price, which editing system delivers the most bang for the buck? Is turnkey the best way to go?

Does anyone know any literary resources with advice on the business end of start-up and operation of a video production outfit?

I know this is all rather general, but it's a new process for me. Any help or input is very much appreciated.


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Rich Rubasch
Re: Question about starting a post-production biz...
on Jun 11, 2007 at 1:22:33 am

The best advice I ever heard concerning a video production company is this:

If you want to make a small fortune in video production...

start with a large fortune.

It seems that you have many questions that indicate that you don't have so much knowledge in the business. I could be wrong. You can search tis forum because this has been discussed many times.

Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media


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Craig Seeman
Re: Question about starting a post-production biz...
on Jun 11, 2007 at 1:49:21 pm

You really need to have a business plan first. You need to know what your target market is before purchasing any gear.

How do you expect to deliver HD to your clients for example?
WHO do you want to target as clients?

Do you plan to do corporate marketing? seminars? weddings? local cable spots? indy features? Docs for broadcast? niche markets of some sort?

Only YOU can answer the above and if you say all of the above you either need an assured client base or your tanked by buying gear that will get little use.

Given your possible targets, HOW are you going to market to them so they know you exist?



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grinner
Re: Question about starting a post-production biz...
on Jun 11, 2007 at 3:03:59 pm

[fernloth] "What would be the essential start-up equipment...obviously an editing system, but camera? With HD on the way, what would be an affordable, reliable solution for aquisition and delivery?

I have had great results with sony's FX1. I dig it alot.

In terms of muscle and price, which editing system delivers the most bang for the buck? Is turnkey the best way to go?

FCP.

Does anyone know any literary resources with advice on the business end of start-up and operation of a video production outfit?"


I don't do much readin'.

This is not an if you build it they will come kind of industry. Build your business around your clientele and grow it as that clientele grows. Your clients are your best sales person... yes much better than you. If they are not selling for you, you will not grow.
have fun and best of luck!





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MindYourVideoBusiness
Re: Question about starting a post-production biz...
on Jun 19, 2007 at 5:18:36 pm

I agree with what some of the others have said.

You need to start with the end in mind. What will your utopian part-time post-production business look like. If I had to guess, it will be a business that you have to work on at night and/or on weekends. This will impact the type of work you can do.

Are you an experienced editor? Another hunch is that perhaps not since you are unaware of the types of edit systems available in the market. Before you spend any money, research the tools. Take a course at a local college so you can get your hands on their gear before striking out on your own. Plus, if you like the systems they have, you can purchase a similar system when you are ready to start your business.

Once you know the tools enough to be dangerous, look for mundane work other production companies don't want to do. For instance, I can't stand the capturing and hard drive project set-up part of the edit process. So, if the right person/opportunity came along, I'd probably let someone else outside of my business do all that work....if the price is right.

Also, we get calls all the time for projects that are much too small for us both in scope and budget. Call the production companies in your area and tell them you'd like to have that business referred to you if they don't want it. I personally don't like to just tell someone "No, we can't do your project" and leave it at that. I always like to send them to another company or videographer who is better suited for the project.

Once you get used to delivering on the lower budget projects, you can start expanding your capabilities and overall offering.

Finally, it's important to realize that just because you purchase professional equipment and software, it doesn't make you a professional. You MUST work hard to learn all you can about the craft so that your work will help clients achieve their goals..which results in you receiving a fair paycheck. Don't overpromise what you can deliver until you are absolutely sure of your skills and abilities. It is better for people (other production companies) to know you are still learning so they can give you less complicated projects than it is for you to accept a large project that you are unable to deliver on. They will never call you again if the latter is the case.

Good luck! Starting a new venture is always an exciting endeavor.

Kristopher G. Simmons

Video Business Coach

MindYourVideoBusiness.com


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