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what would you do? - employee question

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Sam Lesante Jr.
what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 20, 2007 at 1:47:50 pm

O.K. so here's the situation,

Yesterday, some of the "troops" were getting restless.
I was not at our daily meeting because of a previous taping engagement. One of my family members, who is also a part owner of our family business, said to me today that one of our employees was "stressed" out and felt overworked. The employee also said that my father, who is CEO, should be working harder and not them. This was said to my family member in front of most of our employees.

This comment came after the employee took a monday off for a funeral. My father was told about the situation and he talked to the employee about it and to make a long story short, he was not fired on the spot.

So, am I being totally wrong in thinking that this employee is one of the luckiest people in the world?

In my thinking, I know how hard it is to get a job in our field right now, especially where we live. Regional stations are laying off left and right, we get at least 10 resumes a week from people looking for work.

All this employee does is come in, put there 8 hrs in and leave.
They don't have to worry about if a camera breaks, scheduling people to work, maintaining equipment, buying supplies, etc....
Plus, they had an extended weekend. (which by the way the employee told me beforehand that the funeral was for his step-nana who he wasn't that close to.)

So what do you cows think? How do you feel as owners, and how do you feel as employees?

Just wanted to see if I was off my rocker (more than usual anyay)

TIA

Sam


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walter biscardi
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 20, 2007 at 1:54:01 pm

[Sam Lesante Jr.] "The employee also said that my father, who is CEO, should be working harder and not them. This was said to my family member in front of most of our employees."

Anyone who has this attitude is not really worth keeping around. I don't care if they are the greatest editor/animator/producer in the world. The owner / CEO of the company hired this person to do a job and that's all they should worry about. If he / she wants to run their own company, the door is right over there.

I would have certainly given the employee a warning on the spot and remind that person to worry about their own position and not be concerned with running the company. Depending on their reaction, it's either out the door or back to work.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
http://www.biscardicreative.com
HD Editorial & Animation for Food Network's "Good Eats"
HD Editorial for "Assignment Earth"

"I reject your reality and substitute my own!" - Adam Savage, Mythbusters


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Greg
Re: what would you do? - employee question
by
on Feb 20, 2007 at 3:19:43 pm

I have to agree with Walter. It also sounds like this employee may be looking for a severance package. I'd suggest someone (his immediate supervisor) pull him aside and calmly tell him that he has two choices...do his work and keep quiet, or leave. The other thought I have is that obviously there's something going on here. If the overall feeling is that this employee is a 9-5er only, and gives nothing more than his job requirements, does he know that this is the perception of management? Has he had a performance review?

Perhaps that would be a vehicle to clear the air.


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Mark Suszko
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 20, 2007 at 4:39:14 pm

Don't be too hasty. There seems to be more going on here than just a quick surface impression suggests.

I assume this worker was pretty good up to now or in this competitive market they wouldn't have got the job to start with or kept it this long. Managers will tell you it is easier and often cheaper to fix a problem employee having a rough patch than to go get a brand new one. Something has gone sour with this one over time, and whether you fire this guy or not it would probably profit you in any case to figure out what that was or is, or you may keep repeating the conditions that lead to the problem.

Even if the deceased person was not too close, death in the family, or any major change, like retirement of a co-worker, etc. has a tendency to make people re-assess their life and the progress they are making. The rant about overwork: have you looked into that? What was his basis for the remark about not pulling weight evenly? Did he see the CEO breaking a rule and getting away with it or otherwise cheating? That could be a very corrosive thing for morale.

I have been in situations over the course of my career where I was overworked and thrived on it, and overworked and hated it. The difference was how emotionally and creatively invested I was in what I was doing, and if I was recognized for it; it could be like the runner's high, just knowing you are operating at a peak performance level and are unbeatable in that moment, throwing off art in all directions like bolts from the hand of Zeus. I think this is where you get the axiom: "if you want something to get done fast, give it to an already-busy man".

Or it could be like digging ditches at the edge of the beach, watching each scoop fill back in as soon as it was dug, working to a cookie-cutter list of someone else's decisions like some kind of robot, and knowing I would not be getting any recognition for my contributions. Or only blame for someone else's failings.

It also may be that they feel overwhelemed because of a lot of recent changes in the home life apart from work have taken up mental space that used to be free for work problems.

When an employee cries out something drastic like that about the boss, you can bet whatever is behind it has been festering for a long time, and the person has gotten so desperate or disgusted, they are a hat-drop away from quitting and feel there's nothing left to lose. You have daily meetings, but are you sure you are getting all the issues aired at some point, or are they all one-way "this is your list of tasks for the day, kthnxbye"? Do you ever talk about longer-term strategy or direction, about ultimate goals? Daily meetings can be really frustrating for a grunt if you have something to talk about that never makes it to the agenda.

Maybe he IS a flake and this is a single-person aberration. It happens. Or... It could be this guy is the canary in the coal mine and you have a LOT more morale problems in-house than you really knew, perhaps the whole crew is about to mutiny. Sit down and evaluate exactly what the supposed problem of the moment is with this guy, perhaps a little communication will straighten out some misunderstanding he has talked himself into. Put this guy on a quarterly evaluation schedule, also have a weekly ten minute one on one to go over status, and STICK TO IT. If you have those meetings for the first 3 weeks then drop them, you're just going to re-create the problem. They can be informal, say, the time it takes to start and finish a can of soda and bag of chips in a break room. Or a walk around the block, outside the office, on "smoke break". That is very effective because people will often talk more freely about the work if they are not in the building. We often have our best strategy meetings with co-workers in the car on long drives to and from gigs with nothing better to do but look at the road and think and talk. It's a comfortable, neutral space.

It is worth it to retain a good worker and make them re-invest themselves in the work from time to time. Particularly the longer they have worked for you, because people have a tendency to take folks for granted the longer they've been around, and that's a shame.

That works for family as well as co-workers, btw: when's the last time you had that kind of talk with your S.O. or kids? If you can't recall, it's been too long.

Now go take on the day!:-)





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debe
Re: what would you do? - employee question
by
on Feb 20, 2007 at 4:25:31 pm

It's hard to judge someone you don't really know, but he sounds like the employee equivalent to a "grinder".

What's the benefit of keeping him around? How many of those resumes coming in the door are from folks who would be happy to be a part of the team, instead of being....well, whatever it is that this guy is? Are there folks out there that could slide into his chair with minimal effort?

It does sound a little bit like burnout, though. Was he always like this? Is it possible to get the "original" guy back? Was THAT guy worth keeping around?

If it were me, I'd find out what's REALLY up with the guy. If he's a malcontent, I'd find a way to show him the door. Morale in a small business can go in the toliet faster than anywhere else when just one employee starts carping about things that aren't his business to carp about. (Of course, carping about things that ARE his business to carp about are certainly things to pay attention to...)

If he's just "off" for some reason, and you can find a way to get him back...then he might be worth the investment.

Otherwise, can 'im!!

Just my 2


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zrb123
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 20, 2007 at 7:42:58 pm

First let me say that my comments are based from my own personal experiences in working for a small business, which I assume that you are because it sounds like this is a family business.

A common problem with many small businesses is that the people running them have little or no experience or knowledge in actually running a business, they are people with a particular skill that they base there business around. This lack of business knowledge leads to many many problem in the company especially once employees are introduced in to the equation. Now I am not saying this is true in your case, I just say this because based it is possible that the employees comment has some validity.

Another potential problem is that because this is a "family" business, it can make it difficult for a family member to stay impartial when it comes to potential problems with a family member in the business. This is why most companies have strict policies about family members working together.

I do not however agree with were the comment was made. But in a family business it could be that the employee felt that no mater where he made the comment it would be taken by family members as an attack on the family, and so he chose to say it in-front of others so that at least someone who is not a family member could hear his concern.

I also wanted to comment on your use of the term "troops" I hope that you don't use that term in-front of your employees it can easily make them feel like they are an un-valuble grunt, and no employee wants to feel that way even if they really are an un-valuble grunt.

Running a family business can be difficult especially when you start introducing non family members in.



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John Davidson (fomerly JNeo25)
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 20, 2007 at 9:08:32 pm

I'd give the guy a pass. He may not have been close to his step-mom, but he still had to watch his Dad suffer, and that's enough to make anybody a little funky mentally. There's a fine line between people that should be fired and people that will make your ship tighter if you listen.

I would tell him to be a little more constructive in his criticism if possible so that positive change can result if in fact there is a genuine problem. Compaints are like roaches, for every one you hear there are 100 you don't hear. Could be a morale problem around there.

If it is discovered that this guy is a sower of discontent, then you'll need to let him go. If the discontent is malignant and widespread, you'll need to address the problem. 10 resumes a week are useless if the applicants are inexperienced or untrained, which 9.5 of them probably are.

In other words, make sure you don't have a mutiny brewing. Might be a good time to have one of those fun and exciting "voice your concerns" all-staff meetings where people anonymously write-in questions to be asked in the group.

Good luck!
JD

John Davidson____ writer | producer | director____http://www.magicfeatherinc.com


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Mike_S
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 20, 2007 at 11:32:34 pm

Nope. You're just loopy. If you think the old man is in the wrong and should have fired this guy, tell the old man - don't waste our time!

The guy has been to a funeral. Who knows the background - you? Do you even know him?

My guess is he'd be well out of a hick family-run outfit ...



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Ron Lindeboom
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 23, 2007 at 1:09:40 pm

Gee, Mike, now *that* was a useful and insightful post. ;o)

You accuse a man that you don't know of being loopy and ask if he even knows the guy??? Wow, that's a case of doing the very thing you're accusing someone else of. Good thing that you aren't the one running this loopy family-run hick business, eh???

Ron Lindeboom
(who has worked in family-run businesses and wouldn't again -- well, in most cases)


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Stan Timek
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 21, 2007 at 4:38:30 am

"Is the guy lucky" I'd say he is. Many times, in family business situations, the non-family members fare a little worse than the family.

I don't know what your situation is, and I'm sure the people running the business are fair and equitable to all - but is that the feelings of "the troops"? Just that classification or phrase can be very telling of the family's attitude towards the employees.

Maybe everyone at the shop is lucky that your father was entreprenurial enough to start a business and keep it running.


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walter biscardi
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 21, 2007 at 4:56:25 am

[Stan Timek] ""Is the guy lucky" I'd say he is. Many times, in family business situations, the non-family members fare a little worse than the family."

Especially if it really is "a family business" ifyouknowhuti'mtalkin'bout. my Italian heritage comes in useful in all things "family." :-)

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
http://www.biscardicreative.com
HD Editorial & Animation for Food Network's "Good Eats"
HD Editorial for "Assignment Earth"

"I reject your reality and substitute my own!" - Adam Savage, Mythbusters


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Frank Otto
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 22, 2007 at 5:46:53 am

[Sam Lesante Jr.] "All this employee does is come in, put there 8 hrs in and leave.
They don't have to worry about if a camera breaks, scheduling people to work, maintaining equipment, buying supplies, etc...."


That's what "employees" do...their 8 (or 10) and go home...they're employees. All the rest you mention is what managers/owners do.

The "employees" will never feel the same about your company as you and the principals feel - they probably have little say in the operation, wage and perks, and outside of wage/benefits have little in the way of profit sharing, or other things that make entrepenurial folk keep at it long after the whistle blows. Especially if you refer to them as troops.

Step back and look at the world in which we live in now...employees have a who cares attitude just because of statements like "this employee is one of the luckiest people in the world". Most employees are tired of the cavilier management approach of "you're just another number." Or..."I get thirty resumes across my desk a day." Look at what corporate mentality has done to local stations, news and public affairs - "You don't want to work for 14,500 a year? Fine, I got a hundred kids just outta J-school who would kill for your gig."

I just read a Forbes report about employee/employer loyalty and how non-existant it is. The days of two or three generation in the same line of business - same employeer are long gone. Management has used the we'll just replace you line for so long that the employee base just wants their paycheck and two weeks notice so they can get another job from another employeer who sings the same song.

I've been on both sides of this table - as an employer, I've fired a few for cause and cried when I had to layoff 27 talented individuals. As an employee, I've also been the dissenter. One employer took the time to find out what the issue was once, and I busted my ass for him more than before - another told me if I wasn't happy then I could vote with my feet, cause "one phone call and you're replaced." That makes you really loyal.

You mentioned a funeral and personal leave - was that a begrudgingly given leave? And so what if he wasn't close - I wasn't close to my parents, yet when I found out two years after the fact that they had passed on, I was a wreck for a week and have to take time off...so much goes on inside your head no matter what your day-to-day relationship with family is/was.

I'd sum up - but in todays profit driven and us/them world of business labor...what's the point. I hope you're asking because you care about this person...or have some amount of humanity vs. the souless corporate mentality and are wondering why it has to be this way...

Of course...if he's a poor performer (I mean REALLY can't do his job)...then cut the rope. Otherwise, it's big picture time...buck the trend - get in his head and maker him better.



Cheers,

Frank Otto

"Design is a process by which you create something for a client who has no idea of what they want until they see your design - then they know what they want, but your design isn't it."



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debe
Re: what would you do? - employee question
by
on Feb 22, 2007 at 6:26:08 pm

Wow, that's a lot of great insight there, Frank.

Maybe it's part self-preservation, but I certainly had let why I really left my staff job get crammed back into the far recesses of my memory. Usually I just tell folks that the company had grown and changed and we were going in different directions. It had become clear that it was time for me to strike out on my own. That's my professional "if you can't say anything nice..." response when queried.

The company changed dramatically. When I was hired, I was employee number 11. I was also the last non-management position that the owner of the company personally interviewed. It was an assistant editor job. Lowest job on the totem pole at the time. Yet the owner and the VP of Post spent nearly two hours with me that day.

Through mergers, buy-outs and other methods, the company grew and grew while I was there. By the time I left, there were divisions, multiple levels of management, and unfortunately, a "you're lucky to have this job" mentality. I WAS lucky to get the job originally. Most of my co-workers and I had more than proven that our talent, expertise, and personalities are what kept the clients coming back. It had been a mutually benefical relationship. Originally.

When I was accused and punished because an on-staff producer (acquired through a buy-out) thought it was a good career move to blame the failure of a project on me, rather than taking responsibility for the failure on her part to adequately produce...I figured it was time to move on. If they couldn't see what really happened, if management was more intent on pointing fingers and being able to "prove" to the client and the owner that they had taken measures, rather than finding the actual cause, I knew it was time to spread my wings and fly....

I waited a full fiscal quarter before tendering my resignation. I wasn't the first to leave, and I certainly wasn't the last to leave voluntarily. There was a mass exodous of almost all of the real talent in that place. One person admitted to me that the treatment I received was part of what started him thinking about if this is still the kind of place he wanted to be any longer. It certainly wasn't the entire reason he left, but it was the impetus to get him thinking about what kind of company he wanted to work for.

Yet, still, I grew up in a family where my dad went to work for the same company every day for 23 years, and my mom is just about to retire from the same hospital she's been working at since before I was born. I understand loyalty, and I've always been loyal to my employers. It's the way I was raised. Somewhere in there, I finally figured out that in this day and age, companies that are as loyal to their employees as I've seen my parents be to their employers are very few and far between. Unfortunately, it's almost a dead relationship, and that is really very sad. Quitting that job was one of the hardest things I've ever done. I felt very disloyal to the owner of the company. I ran into him in the airport a few years later. It was one of the most awkward situations in which I've ever found myself. I certainly feel no guilt for quitting to the management at the time, yet I still feel badly about quitting to the owner.

People know that the best way to get a raise is to get a new job. Employers know that the best way to get someone cheaper is to make the guy or gal with lots of experience quit. Somewhere in there, both sides have forgotten that there's more to this than the bottom line. They seem to have forgotten, or have yet to figure out, that a happy employee is a large part of the equation for happy clients. A crabby employee says horrible things about your company, makes your clients uncomfortable, and may make them move along. The smartest way to keep your clients happy is to keep your employees happy. Of course, client loyalty is the part of the equation that seems to be missing in most of our conversation here. A loyal client is a client that likes to work with you. If it ceases to be fun, or productive, or efficient, or cost-effective, clients will leave. How do you keep it fun, productive, efficient & cost-effective? Keep the employees in top form! This is not to say that employees should come before clients, but a delicate balance needs to be achieved. Employees shouldn't suffer to keep the clients happy, and the clients shouldn't be ignored to keep the employees happy.

Most of my clients today are people that I worked with or at least had met while I was on staff. Now that the company no longer exists, it's easier to have honest conversations with them about those days. Most of them tell me that things over there changed dramatically about the time everyone was leaving. It wasn't fun anymore. There was an air of something is "no longer right". It wasn't about the price or quality of services, although those were a factor, but really that it had become a soul-less place. There was one guy left from those "golden" days, and he was the saving grace. People would go back for him. Most of the rest of them came along with the rest of us. Clients don't keep coming back because they like the managers. People come back because the like the product and the experience. Translation: They like the employees. The people who earn the company the money should be much more respected than they seem to be these days.

Would we have all been better off if we'd stayed together? Would the company have survived past 5 years if we had not all left? No one can really answer that, I know.

I'm certainly not regretting my decision, but sometimes I wonder how long it could have gone on if different decisions had been made at the management level. Maybe the owner would have still sold 5 years later, but if management had made better decisions and had been more loyal to the employees, I bet the company would have been worth a whole lot more when he did sell.

debe


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Steve Wargo
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 23, 2007 at 5:40:15 am

I tend to go too easy on people, up to a point. In business school, they teach "Hire slow. Fire fast". However, you have to look at the entire situation as an outsider. Is this person treated the same as family? Does he have an "attitude"? Is there some reason that he is allowed to disrespect the CEO? It's no business of his how much the boss does. His ONLY concern is his job, his responsibilities and the question of whether he is being treated fairly. Is he looking to get fired so that he can file a lawsuit?

I guess that my first tendency, had he disrespected my father, would have been to toss him through the closest plate glass window, but that is me and I am hardly the person to show clear thinking when a close family member has been pissed on in front of others.

Find a way to get rid of this problem before it costs you money. And it will. If you have to come here and ask, you already know the answer. You're only looking for us to agree.

Now, for my level headed advice: Consult the company attorney on how to get rid of this guy.


Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona

It's a dry heat!


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Sam Lesante Jr.
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 23, 2007 at 11:31:48 am

Wow!

Thanks to all of you for the great insight and advice. It puts it all into perspective for me a little bit better.

To clear up some things;

1. I do not use the word "troops" to characterize my employees, it was me trying to use a witty phrase.

2. It was not his mother that passed, it was his step grandma that he has talked about in the past about just meeting her a year or so ago, so I think it is safe to say he has no emotional connection to her.

3. Our company is really small compared to others. We only have 7 full timers and 2 or 3 part timers not counting me, my sister, my mom and dad.

4. I am the softy in the business, I am the one who usually tries to think of an excuse for them as to why they did something wrong or why this piece of equipment broke or why the video is blue or why the audio did not come out as good as usual. We even allow him to use our company vehicle as a personal one as well because he has no way of getting around. All we ask in return is for him to stay an hour or two more a week. I think that's a great deal.

But I guess I got a little bit more upset when I heard of the remark about my father who came from picking coal as a kid, went through college while selling musical instruments from a corner store, busted his ass for everything he has today, is still busting his ass to keep the business alive for me and my sister to take over someday. In the 35 or so years he has had employees, I think he only fired 4 or 5 (and they were the bad apples because I was around for some of them)

So, I guess the reason for my first post was double fold in a way.

1. To come on and vent a little about how my employee pissed me off

2. To get some expert advice from people who have been in this situation before on both sides of the coin so I can understand more about my employee because I do believe in having employees for a long term. Before 2 years ago, all of our employees were with us for 6 to 9 years. Now, like Frank said, we have 2 or 3 that have been here longer than 4 and the rest are only 2-3 years.

Thanks again for all the great posts, I did not expect that many.

It has been a couple of days since the incident now, and the employee is working like nothing even happened. It seems to me like he is acting a bit more positive. Maybe the funeral thing had a bigger effect on him than I or he wants to believe it did.

Sam Lesante Jr.



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Steve Wargo
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 23, 2007 at 4:09:33 pm

And maybe he realizes that he is an a--hole and needs to stay under the radar. Either way, make sure you put this in his file and gather witness statements now while it's fresh in everyone's minds.

Sometime, people don't know how to handle death. This might have affected him deeplt even if he didn't really know the person. Or...he is using it as an excuse.

Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona

It's a dry heat!


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Frosch
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 23, 2007 at 6:25:16 pm

Yours is a video production business, no? Just asking cuz you were talking about "venting".
I wonder if any of your employees might stumble across this thread, I mean, it's pretty specific, and we are a relatively small industry.
I don't know if I'd be too jazzed about working for a company that airs their dirty laundry online...


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Sam Lesante Jr.
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Feb 28, 2007 at 6:19:37 pm

At this point I don't really care if he does see it.

Whenever I post anything online, I assume the person I'm talking about and everyone around the area is seeing it so that's not a concern to me.



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grinner
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Mar 1, 2007 at 12:59:01 am

I never made a habbit of staying where I wasn't wanted. If I felt over worked and under paid, I assumed they wanted me to bail and I did just that. I never griped, especially in meetings. One is either glad to be there or one isn't. I have only had to fire one person in my lifetime. The rest, like me, knew when it was time to move on. Maye you should drop a hint.
It's very hard for artists to work for the boss's son. If he knew the deal coming into this, it's his bad but if a fence has been built around a wild stallion, he'll always kick it down and run.



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Frank Otto
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Mar 2, 2007 at 1:26:54 pm

Grin, I wish the rest of us could get to work in your world! Or could get some of the folks there to let the rest of us in. It's a good place to be coming from. I'm not joking or being sarcastic (note:no "s...s/" in use). I've followed your journey the past few via the Art of the Edit forum - you've done some huge creative and CK and I have often discussed your posts from the technical to the esoteric. So don't be offended - I'm just using your post as a reason to jump back in...

I gotta tell ya - this thread and one about "The Film Look" in the Cinematography forum seems to have encapsuled this brave new world of what I'm calling "creatology." It's a world just filled to the brim with folks that own baseballs believing that ownership is proof of ability to use one or those that own baseball teams believing ownership is proof of ability to coach.

Or, dropping the metaphors, it's a mean new world of people buying creativity in the way of technology without having the knowledge or skills to create with said technolgy and/or non-creatives buying creative types and, in doing so fall under the assumption that they are now themselves, creative. And in both cases it's all about making tons of fast cash.

I just don't see the era of all of us playing in the sandbox together and building castles and sharing our toys and knowing when recess was over like we did when we were four(and truly creative), happening anytime soon. In fact, the sandbox has turned into the catbox of corporate p&l sheets, with stinky little pockets of coagulated shareholder equity and the occasional bottom line turd.

And just after you get the thing all destunkified (destinkified? Verb? Noun? Tense? Buhler?) and begin building a bigger castle, the lo-ball bully kids get out of school and kick your castle apart or, worse yet, show up "en-masse," and in an instant, all your sand has dissapeared.

And then the damn cat comes back...

"What the heck happened to our sandbox?" and "What the heck is a sandbox?" and varients about building your own and what is a good one/bad one, where do I get sand - how do I get it back...keeping the cat out...you get the idea; these are the questions we all need answered if we're all going to get back to doing what we do best - create worlds where none exist, out of just sand and a little mosisture. With apologies to author David Gerrold, who's sandbox analogy I have stolen liberally from, it's no longer about recoqnizing the difference between a sandbox and a catbox (i.e playing in one and doing "business" in the other).

It's all catbox now.

Is the problem reaching pandemic proportions? Is it just us or is it labor vs management in general? Is it corporate greed? Global warming...sorry, wrong rant. One thing for certain, it isn't going to change from the top - just like building a new house, the work has to begin at the bottom.

So, peasants..it's time to light your torches - a cleaner Transylvania is up to us. Now, how much is good sand and how do I keep the cat out...

Cheers,

Frank Otto

"Design is a process by which you create something for a client who has no idea of what they want until they see your design - then they know what they want, but your design isn't it."



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zrb123
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Mar 1, 2007 at 3:58:00 am

If he just read your last statement,

"At this point I don't really care if he does see it."

then he and every other employee at your company will know just how little you and the company care about them as employees and as people.



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Steve Wargo
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Mar 12, 2007 at 7:39:24 am

Actually Frank, it shows how much he cares about the problem person. I always appreciate it when people are truthful to me, even if I don't like that truth. (usually)

Steve Wargo
Tempe, Arizona

It's a dry heat!


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Sam Lesante Jr.
Re: what would you do? - employee question
on Mar 14, 2007 at 3:06:08 pm

Thanks Steve for the backup. You are right. It's like a tough love kind of thing. Of course, since none of you work here for me, you don't know how far backwards I bend for all my employees cause they are, overall, great employees.

Well, gotta go. I have a chiropractor appointment ;)

Sam


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