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Finding money for Show Production

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Sir HamiltonFinding money for Show Production
by on Nov 13, 2006 at 11:22:43 am

Hi, Im a Video Producer, editor, and After Effects Super-star. I have been conceptualizing and writing a Show, one that would encorporate an amazing amount of awsomeness. I already have the crew and cast lined up for it. All that is between me and acctual production is time and Money, I want to start curving my efforts around funding it and so I want to know exactly what format of presentation I should aim it toward to impress investors, grant associations, and money givers. My questions to you guys, the experienced proffesionals is this:

1. What do I need prepared for perfect proffesional presentation?
2. Who do I pitch it to?
3. Where does money come from in this industry?
4. What are good resources on- grants, TV production, and Production tips?
4. If I bury a hundred dollar bill in the ground, care for it, and water it everyday, will my money grow?

thank you for anything you can help me with, and thank you for your time.

Hal S


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Bruce Bennett in Madison, WIRe: Finding money for Show Production
by on Nov 13, 2006 at 3:40:50 pm

Sir Hamilton,

I personally have not done any TV pilots or shows, but a couple of my colleagues have. From what I've learned, the number one component that determines success is "Distribution."
You can have the best idea for the best show on the face of the earth, but if you don't have distribution lined up, then it makes it very hard to convince potential investors to spend their money with you.

One company that takes programming to Cable TV is "CABLEready." Their Website is http://www.cableready.net. I hear that most such type companies require high-end production values and formats (like digiBeta and HDCAM).

Good luck,
Bruce


Bruce Bennett,
Bennett Marketing & Media Production, LLC - http://www.bmmp.com


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Ron LindeboomRe: Finding money for Show Production
by on Nov 13, 2006 at 4:44:37 pm


[Sir Hamilton] "Hi, Im a Video Producer, editor, and After Effects Super-star."

And humble, too. ;o)


[Sir Hamilton] "All that is between me and acctual production is time and Money,"

Two fierce and unforgiving adversaries, indeed.


[Sir Hamilton] "What do I need prepared for perfect proffesional presentation?"

I'd start with a spell-checker and move on from there. No one will take you serious when you are pitching for money and there are as many typos in your presentation as there are in this single post.

Money people will often turn up their noses at "roughs" that include enough typos which, to them, read as sloppy work and the portent of more of the same in the production process.


[Sir Hamilton] "If I bury a hundred dollar bill in the ground, care for it, and water it everyday, will my money grow? "

In this industry, you often need liberal amounts of manure added to bring things to fruition.

Finding an agent is a sure way to access a bountiful manure supply.


[Sir Hamilton] "What are good resources on grants..."

On TV there's an oddball named Matthew Lesko who hawks his book on bilking the government out of grant and other monies while wearing dork-supreme glasses and moronic Batman nemesis Riddler suits with question marks all over them. (His Dad must cringe every time he comes on, I know I would if he were my son.)

While you will likely never get any of the money he points to and will waste a lot of time trying to do so, he will get you thinking about things that you had never considered before (seriously) and I'd recommend his book for that alone.

The guy may be a dork of a dresser and overstate his case and give a false impression of things but he will get you thinking.

Best regards,

Ron Lindeboom


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tony salgadoRe: Finding money for Show Production
by on Nov 14, 2006 at 3:00:42 am



Ron,


Great answer.

One I must add to my "best of the Cow" posts.


Love that manure reference.



Tony Salgado


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Shane RossRe: Finding money for Show Production
by on Nov 14, 2006 at 6:35:23 am

[Sir Hamilton] "one that would encorporate an amazing amount of awsomeness."

That is what we need more of on TV. Too much out there with an amazing amount of suckiness.

TV pilots are funded by TV networks typically. Pitched to them...oh about October...then ordered in Feb and shot in April. But, people do also do pilots using their own cash and pitch them...thus the USA hit IT'S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA. I also know of companies who have gotten 1/2 of their funding for series from networks who then need to drum up the other half, typically from distributors buying the foreign rights to the show.

But pilots are tough. No distributors...no return on investment unless the show is picked up. You will be amazed how many pilots are shot, and how many make it to the screen. i'd say the ratio is easily 7-1. One out of every 7 pilots shot get picked up. NBC has 6 new shows? Then between 20 and 40 pilots were shot.


Shane

Littlefrog Post
http://www.lfhd.net


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Aanarav SareenRe: Finding money for Show Production
by on Nov 14, 2006 at 7:30:46 am

I will echo on Shane's comments above. This year I shot quite a few pilots and only one of them got picked up for a 13-episode run on Saturday mornings. It's unfortunate that I was only a part of the pilot, but the game is VERY tough. I know someone that works at the "script approval" office at Warner Brothers and according to him, only 1 / 200 scripts get picked up. From the scripts that do get picked up, only 10% make it to the screen.

Aanarav Sareen
premiere@asvideoproductions.com


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Bob Colemore about the script reader's perspective?
by on Nov 16, 2006 at 1:51:06 pm

[Aanarav Sareen] "only 1 / 200 scripts get picked up. From the scripts that do get picked up, only 10% make it to the screen."


"So you're telling me there's a chance." (Lloyd, "Dumb and Dumber")

I'd love to know more about the selection process. What does your friend say about the quality of the 200 scripts? Of those, how many are awful/promising/not quite there....

And of the 1/200 scripts that are picked up, how many are "virgins?" That is, scripts from unknowns, scripts therefore that are chosen based ONLY on their merits, vs. the reputation of the people attached to the project?

It seems to me that choosing a successful film based on the screenplay must be one of the toughest jobs in the world, and I suspect that many screenplays are given a chance only because of extrinsic factors.

-- BC


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Aanarav SareenRe: more about the script reader's perspective?
by on Nov 18, 2006 at 5:03:45 am

[Bob Cole] ""So you're telling me there's a chance." (Lloyd, "Dumb and Dumber")"

There is always a chance. :-)

[Bob Cole] "What does your friend say about the quality of the 200 scripts? Of those, how many are awful/promising/not quite there...."

From what I am told, 80% of the scripts submitted fall under the category "ridiculous" or "been there...done that" The other 10% then move forward to other departments (finance, legal etc.)

[Bob Cole] "And of the 1/200 scripts that are picked up, how many are "virgins?" That is, scripts from unknowns, scripts therefore that are chosen based ONLY on their merits, vs. the reputation of the people attached to the project?"

Quite a few, actually. Although, if you are a reputed individual in the industry, the first step is usually easy to cross. But, all of them go through the same process. No special deals for anyone.

[Bob Cole] "It seems to me that choosing a successful film based on the screenplay must be one of the toughest jobs in the world, and I suspect that many screenplays are given a chance only because of extrinsic factors."

It most certainly is difficult, but not impossible. In the 5 years I have been working in television, there are a few methods to get noticed.

- Aanarav

Aanarav Sareen
premiere@asvideoproductions.com

http://www.asvideoproductions.com/techtalk


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Aanarav SareenRe: more about the script reader's perspective?
by on Nov 18, 2006 at 5:15:09 am

[Aanarav Sareen] "80% of the scripts submitted fall under the category "ridiculous" or "been there...done that""

Sorry, that should say 90%. Out of the 10% that do move on, most of them are cut because of financial/legal/creative reasons.

- Aanarav

Aanarav Sareen
premiere@asvideoproductions.com

http://www.asvideoproductions.com/techtalk


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Bob ColeRe: more about the script reader's perspective?
by on Nov 18, 2006 at 3:17:25 pm

[Aanarav Sareen] "the category "ridiculous" or "been there...done that""


Thanks for the very interesting perspective -- I'm assuming your friend works on tv projects, not features, right?

It's surprising that "been there...done that" disqualifies a project. Most of the tv schedule seems to look that way.

-- Bob


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Aanarav SareenRe: more about the script reader's perspective?
by on Nov 22, 2006 at 9:31:29 pm

[Bob Cole] "Thanks for the very interesting perspective -- I'm assuming your friend works on tv projects, not features, right?"

Correct.

[Bob Cole] "It's surprising that "been there...done that" disqualifies a project. Most of the tv schedule seems to look that way."

Well, most of them that are rejected have similar characters and a very similar plot line.

PS: Sorry for the delayed responses. These past few days have been very hectic!

- Aanarav

Aanarav Sareen
premiere@asvideoproductions.com

http://www.asvideoproductions.com/techtalk


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