FORUMS: list search recent posts

movie trailer voice

COW Forums : Adobe Audition

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
atleditor
movie trailer voice
on Jul 6, 2007 at 5:47:45 pm

how can I make my voice sound like the guys in the movie trailers?


Return to posts index

willie toth
Re: movie trailer voice
on Jul 7, 2007 at 10:30:29 am



First you need the basic voice but try adding a couple of db of low end via the PARAMETRIC EQ and then a bit of reverb .... WILLIE


Return to posts index

Emmett
Re: movie trailer voice
on Jul 8, 2007 at 6:41:40 pm

That's just the way those guys sound...Really. I have set up mic chains for guys who do trailers and there is very little processing. Rarely, if ever, is there a boost in the low end. It's almost always flat or slighly cut. The last guy I set up needed a cut of about 1dB near 200Hz. Then it was flat all the way up to 10kHz, where there was a 1-2dB boost. We also used a low-cut filter below 40Hz at 18dB/octave. For compression, it was a simply a 2:1 ratio with a fast attack (I normally prefer a slower attack, but with this particular talent, faster was essential) and med-fast release. Nothing else. 85% of the sound comes from the voice, 10% comes from mic, preamp, mic technique and placement and the other 5% comes from processing.

Emmett


Return to posts index


xgfmedia
Re: movie trailer voice
on Jul 9, 2007 at 1:05:07 pm

We covered this - albeit slightly - recently.
As Willie mentioned, the mic itself is a contributory
factor. When it comes to 'warming' the voice, a good
mic can make all the difference. We use Shure SM58s
for most things - they're a condenser mic, wonderfully
cheap (


Return to posts index

xgfmedia
Re: movie trailer voice
on Jul 9, 2007 at 1:06:12 pm

As Emmett mentioned, sorry.

myspace.com/xgfmedia


Return to posts index

Emmett
Re: movie trailer voice
on Jul 10, 2007 at 2:49:47 am

The SM58 is actually a dynamic mic, not a condenser. I can see how it would be useful for a variety of applications, but it isn't one I would ever choose for studio work...At least not spoken narration. For that, you'll amost always want a condenser (though some choose Sennheiser MD421, Shure SM7 or EV RE-20 or RE27). The most popular mics for voiceover work are the Neumann U87, Neumann TLM103 and Sennheiser MKH-416 P48 Shotgun. Don LaFontaine (the king of movie trailers) uses a Manley Gold Reference into an Avalon preamp. Many people I know use the Sennheiser MKH-416, which is what you would most likely use in a Hollywood studio. Nearly every LA studio has a 416 in their cabinet. I prefer the 416 for heavier promo work, but I prefer the Neumann TLM103 for character or narration work. It has a more natural sound. I'm not a big fan of the Neumann U87 for most voices. The Sennheiser 416 is nice because it has a very tight super cardioid pattern and performs very nicely when mic'd close.

Don't forget about the preamp. It's every bit as important as the mic. Many talents use Avalon, Presonus, Symetrix or Universal Audio. I prefer Focusrite, Neve, API or John Hardy.

My primary setup is an Audio-Technica AT4040 paired with a Focusrite Platinum Voicemaster Pro. It suits most of my needs well. I use a Sennheiser MKH-416 with a Focusrite VM Pro for heavy promo work and I sometimes use a Neumann TLM103 paired with a Symetrix 528E for narration.

Where you place the mic is important too!

Emmett


Return to posts index


willie toth
Re: movie trailer voice
on Jul 10, 2007 at 10:52:44 am



I can't agree more when it comes to a good mic pre and a large diaphragm mic, but in the end if you don't have a good announcing voice to begin with all of this is for not ......... WILLIE


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]