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Alan Balch
Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 15, 2013 at 3:35:21 pm

Hello all,
I've had a request to make an "emotional, pulling heart strings" video for donors.
The client wants the video to be graphics heavy and fast moving and even sent a link to a video of previous years that they like.

As the videographer/editor, I feel like if I'm going to make an emotional video, I'd rather see and hear stories from people instead of a bunch of graphics flying across a screen.

Any thoughts on this subject?

Alan Balch
Videographer/Carle Foundation Hosptial
alan.balch@carle.com


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Mark Suszko
Re: Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 15, 2013 at 8:32:59 pm

I think either path is valid by itself, and there can be room to combine kinetic typography with b-roll and interview clips.

But if you ARE going to combine them, use the kinetic typography to link the visual sections, to communicate the statistical data sections, and depict things you don't have visuals for. Use video for the emotional subtext and the overall pitch.

I can't stress how important really good music and audio design is in these things.


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Bill Davis
Re: Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 16, 2013 at 5:31:57 am

[Alan Balch] "Hello all,
I've had a request to make an "emotional, pulling heart strings" video for donors.
The client wants the video to be graphics heavy and fast moving and even sent a link to a video of previous years that they like.

As the videographer/editor, I feel like if I'm going to make an emotional video, I'd rather see and hear stories from people instead of a bunch of graphics flying across a screen.

Any thoughts on this subject?

Alan Balch"


Sure.

You are right, they are 100% wrong.

Here's my 2 cents:

Tell them that you believe that all the "real" charities expend 99% of their raised funds on direct benefits. That the organization workers should be paid no more than 1 percent of the "take" - and that the head of the charity should be paid no more than one third of that 1 percent. And that they should invest their receipts in Canadian Oil Shale Company shares. And that they should do all their office correspondence using canary colored paper.

And when they look back at you like you're an idiot because there's no actual reason in hell that YOU should be telling THEM how to do their job - see if they figure out that it's maybe possibly not that different from them telling you so specifically how to do yours.

Quietly suggest that they spend their time telling you about what their charity is all about. WHY people should donate to it. Have them tell you the nature of the USE they'll put the video to. And then tell them you'll come back with one or two basic treatments based on YOU being the expert in the use of video to accomplish the goals they articulate. This will result in your being excited and motivated to do exceptional work - rather than being constrained into being just a robot executing the re-cycled ideas they liked last year.

If they say OK - then dive in and work with them.

If they don't - move on.

The worst possible client you can ever have is one that's completely convinced that they need to tell experienced creative people how to be creative.

Sorry for the RANT, but I'm kinda tired of hassling with organizations who dumped all their experienced creatives during the economic downturn and who now are populated with people with no CLUE about how creative production actually works - but still think they should be able to manage creative workers using the same techniques they use to manage the office cleaning crew.

And here's a hint. It does NOT work by making creatives perform "do overs" of creative thing you liked from LAST year. If the charity wants that - gently suggest that they should go BACK to the people who created the thing they liked last year. They were obviously good at that.

OK, honestly a big chunk of this is firmly tongue in cheek. And obviously, the truth is that being anything other than polite and respectful to any client is a stupid idea. But it's also stupid to hire, say, a talented dancer then short circuit their creativity by making them dance to crappy, uninspiring music.

FWIW.

; )

Oh, and please CHECK the charity out.. There are a wide range of wonderful charities doing great work out there - and an almost equal number largely run to make the folks in power at the top, a pile of money. Just sayin'

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.


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charles meadows
Re: Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 20, 2013 at 1:47:28 pm

We've all suffered the all knowing, all wise, all creative client. The best thing we ever did was to fire them if they weren't interested in anything we had to say or advise. Once you fire your first client it becomes liberating, you begin to attract the kind of client you want to work with rather than the client who wants only for you to work for them.

Good advice Bill.

"There's no point in filming if you don't have fun"
Charles Meadows
Creative Director
Incubate Productions South Africa
http://www.incubatevideo.co.za


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Roger Van Duyn
Re: Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 16, 2013 at 1:46:50 pm

Hey Alan,

Looking at your signature, are you an actual employee of the hospital and are you being asked by your department head to make a pitch for donors to the hospital where you are employed?

Before I was a freelance videographer, I worked for hospitals and clinics in the lab. When someone called the lab, and wanted me to do something, how I responded depended upon which type of "boss" they were. We were told we were working for the patient, for the doctor, for the ... (Believe it or not, there were actual laws determining how I could answer certain requests for information etc. depending upon who was asking).

Were they a patient? Were they a physician? Were they a vendor? Were they a nurse on the floor or from a doctor's office? Was it section supervisor or the lab manager or the medical director of the lab asking me to do something?

How you respond depends a lot upon the employee-employer or client-vendor relationship you are in. Some of my actual supervisors in my previous career would listen. Some would not. IF it is your actual supervisor asking, a lot depends upon how much they value your expertise, and how much they think they know about your area of expertise. Client relations and employer-employee relations are more art then science. Even if you are right, sometimes you have to just go along, if you want to keep your job. Especially if you are new. Only one hospital I worked for even had people doing video production in-house, and that department disappeared during a downturn. Another clinic where I worked had a guy in the marketing department doing it all. But both that hospital and clinic went outside for their commercials...

Not sure if these ramblings are a help to you or not. Are you asking a technical question about what to do in the video, or a question about how to deal with a certain person, office politics etc.?

Roger


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Rich Rubasch
Re: Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 17, 2013 at 7:46:52 pm

This is pretty darn effective and it doesn't have a single spoken word or a single live action image...

Tell me about your heart strings after watching this thru.








Rich Rubasch
Tilt Media Inc.
Video Production, Post, Studio Sound Stage
Founder/President/Editor/Designer/Animator
http://www.tiltmedia.com


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Karen Baldwin
Re: Graphics Heavy Videos
on Oct 18, 2013 at 10:25:39 am

All wonderful and helpful answers, I thank you all gratuitously. I don't need it to be flashy I just need it to run well and look nice for the videos,


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