FORUMS: list search recent posts

Designing video graphics to be viewed on multiple screens

COW Forums : Corporate Video

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
Kevin Ryan
Designing video graphics to be viewed on multiple screens
on Dec 30, 2011 at 8:20:46 pm

I have asked this question in another forum, but it is relevent here too.
I work for a local government media department. Our videos are aired on tv and then uploaded to the web. As many businesses are doing, we want to make our videos available the growing number of mobile devices.
Typically sized lower thirds and other graphics look fine for viewing on a "normal" sized tv monitor. But they are just about impossible to read when watching that same video on a mobile device.
Any thoughts as how to deal with this issue?
I think this will become a big issue for any of us with product destined for multiscreen viewing

Kevin Ryan
Editor/Graphics
The Government Channel
City of Charlotte
Charlotte, NC


Return to posts index

Mark Suszko
Re: Designing video graphics to be viewed on multiple screens
on Jan 3, 2012 at 8:23:39 pm

My first impulse is to say: who (among consumers)cares about lower thirds on their phones' video screens anyway? This is one area where extra graphics are not welcomed, so should be minimalized.

My second idea is that you can try re-formatting the graphics for that specific platform: make them full-screen title cards that flash up before the content, or upsize them and scroll them. Or build them to actually take up a third of the screen, only in a different way from standard placement.

Think about why and IF you want or need that lower-third there in the first place, in this application. Does the identification of the speaker confer additional status or credibility by showing their title/credentials? Is it redundant, because the subject also mentions it verbally, or it's in the full screen opening title? Can title info be incorporated in the shot itself?

If the lower-third or other graphic is a sales message that NEEDS to Be seen, then re-compose it for the format, with more appropriate fonts and colors and effects. Break up larger messages into more manageable chunks.


Return to posts index

Kevin Ryan
Re: Designing video graphics to be viewed on multiple screens
on Jan 4, 2012 at 12:56:19 am

I suppose if the lower thirds and graphics were important enough for the original tv version, the information is important even for for smaller screens. I think I will explore your thought on the full screen graphics for mobile applications.

Kevin Ryan
Editor/Graphics
The Government Channel
City of Charlotte
Charlotte, NC


Return to posts index


Mark Suszko
Re: Designing video graphics to be viewed on multiple screens
on Jan 4, 2012 at 2:25:59 am

Quote:

"I suppose if the lower thirds and graphics were important enough for the original tv version, the information is important even for for smaller screens"

You might think so, initially, but I'm saying the nature of the audience for smaller-format versions may actually be fundamentally different than for broadcast, with different values and viewing conventions. They may even find conventional thirds quaint, stuffy or irrelevant. I know I watch things differently when they are on a tiny ipod screen, versus a TV.

Think about the viewing relationship and how people normally sit 50-plus feet from a movie screen, ten or more feet back from a TV, but only a foot or so from a computer's web browser or a phone. Psychologically, it's vastly different, and intimate for those settings, in different ways. My comment really wasn't an attempt to be flippant, asking if thirds were relevant in the smaller scale, but a way of asking if it doesn't demand a re-thinking of what's relevant or "conventional" in each discrete user environment. Don't you want to optimize the experience for every specific mode?


Return to posts index

Joseph W. Bourke
Re: Designing video graphics to be viewed on multiple screens
on Jan 14, 2012 at 6:36:54 pm

Not to be difficult, but in corporate video, there's a message, or information, or educational information to be put across. And generally, there's a pretty large investment which is expecting a return in sales, or easier product usage, or fewer tech support calls, so the analogy of the movie theater compared to a hand held device doesn't hold water. Movie goers don't walk out of the theater expecting to install software, or buy a product (maybe popcorn), or know more than they came in knowing.

The corporate video's job is to give each and every viewer the same experience, which is why it can be so superior to a sales call, or a tech support operator, or any other situation in which a variable can occur which could confuse the message.

For my money - I would design the graphics so that they would read well on the smallest screen, then apply that to whatever other formats are required. I agree with Mark that there may be different ways to get the data or info across, but at the end of the day, the message should be consistent across all media - that's what builds awareness and gets response.

Joe Bourke
Owner/Creative Director
Bourke Media
http://www.bourkemedia.com


Return to posts index

<< PREVIOUS   •   VIEW ALL   •   PRINT   •   NEXT >>
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]